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Devon Greyson, Rod Knight, Jean A Shoveller
Population health information interventions (PHIIs) use information in efforts to promote health. PHIIs may push information to a target audience (communication), pull information from the public (surveillance), or combine both in a bidirectional intervention. Although PHIIs have often been framed as non-invasive and ethically innocuous, in reality they may be intrusive into people's lives, affecting not only their health but their senses of security, respect, and self-determination. Ethical acceptability of PHIIs may have impacts on intervention effectiveness, potentially giving rise to unintended consequences...
February 19, 2018: Health Promotion International
Thalia Arawi, Lama Charafeddine
Bioethics is a relatively new addition to bedside medical care in Arab world which is characterized by a special culture that often makes blind adaptation of western ethics codes and principles; a challenge that has to be faced. To date, the American University of Beirut Medical Center is the only hospital that offers bedside ethics consultations in the Arab Region aiming towards better patient-centered care. This article tackles the role of the bedside clinical ethics consultant as an active member of the medical team and the impact of such consultations on decision-making and patient-centered care...
February 20, 2018: Developing World Bioethics
Aimee van Wynsberghe, Scott Robbins
Many industry leaders and academics from the field of machine ethics would have us believe that the inevitability of robots coming to have a larger role in our lives demands that robots be endowed with moral reasoning capabilities. Robots endowed in this way may be referred to as artificial moral agents (AMA). Reasons often given for developing AMAs are: the prevention of harm, the necessity for public trust, the prevention of immoral use, such machines are better moral reasoners than humans, and building these machines would lead to a better understanding of human morality...
February 19, 2018: Science and Engineering Ethics
P Ethicist
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 1, 2018: Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics: JERHRE
Adsa Fatima, Aarthi Chandrasekhar, Amita Pitre
Five years since Nirbhaya, and nearly as long since the Justice Verma Committee Report, amendments to the Criminal Law Amendment Act 2013, and the National guidelines and protocols on medico-legal care for survivors of sexual violence by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW) 2014, we, concerned individuals, women's groups, health organisations, ethicists, and academicians, urgently demand the attention of the central and state governments - to the continuing injustice, violations and discrimination against survivors of gender-based violence (GBV)...
January 18, 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Ann Gallagher, David Augustin Hodge
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Nursing Ethics
Melanie Calvert, Derek Kyte, Rebecca Mercieca-Bebber, Anita Slade, An-Wen Chan, Madeleine T King, Amanda Hunn, Andrew Bottomley, Antoine Regnault, An-Wen Chan, Carolyn Ells, Daniel O'Connor, Dennis Revicki, Donald Patrick, Doug Altman, Ethan Basch, Galina Velikova, Gary Price, Heather Draper, Jane Blazeby, Jane Scott, Joanna Coast, Josephine Norquist, Julia Brown, Kirstie Haywood, Laura Lee Johnson, Lisa Campbell, Lori Frank, Maria von Hildebrand, Michael Brundage, Michael Palmer, Paul Kluetz, Richard Stephens, Robert M Golub, Sandra Mitchell, Trish Groves
Importance: Patient-reported outcome (PRO) data from clinical trials can provide valuable evidence to inform shared decision making, labeling claims, clinical guidelines, and health policy; however, the PRO content of clinical trial protocols is often suboptimal. The SPIRIT (Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Interventional Trials) statement was published in 2013 and aims to improve the completeness of trial protocols by providing evidence-based recommendations for the minimum set of items to be addressed, but it does not provide PRO-specific guidance...
February 6, 2018: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Patricia Balthazar, Peter Harri, Adam Prater, Nabile M Safdar
The Hippocratic oath and the Belmont report articulate foundational principles for how physicians interact with patients and research subjects. The increasing use of big data and artificial intelligence techniques demands a re-examination of these principles in light of the potential issues surrounding privacy, confidentiality, data ownership, informed consent, epistemology, and inequities. Patients have strong opinions about these issues. Radiologists have a fiduciary responsibility to protect the interest of their patients...
February 2, 2018: Journal of the American College of Radiology: JACR
Giulia Cavaliere
J. Benjamin Hurlbut's book Experiments in Democracy: Human Embryo Research and the Politics of Bioethics is an historiographical analysis of the American debate over embryo research. It covers more than four decades of this debate and uses key actors, bodies, and events as empirical evidence for its analysis. At a first glance, it might seem like a book that tells a story, but Experiments in Democracy is much more than that. Hurlbut uses the chapters of this narrative as case studies through which to examine practices of deliberative democracy and the role played by scientists and ethicists in the deliberative processes concerning embryo research and the governance thereof...
January 24, 2018: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry
Gert Helgesson, Göran Bertilsson, Helena Domeij, Gunilla Fahlström, Emelie Heintz, Anders Hjern, Christina Nehlin Gordh, Viviann Nordin, Jenny Rangmar, Ann-Margret Rydell, Viveka Sundelin Wahlsten, Monica Hultcrantz
BACKGROUND: Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) is an umbrella term covering several conditions for which alcohol consumption during pregnancy is taken to play a causal role. The benefit of individuals being identified with a condition within FASD remains controversial. The objective of the present study was to identify ethical aspects and consequences of diagnostics, interventions, and family support in relation to FASD. METHODS: Ethical aspects relating to diagnostics, interventions, and family support regarding FASD were compiled and discussed, drawing on a series of discussions with experts in the field, published literature, and medical ethicists...
January 5, 2018: BMC Medical Ethics
Katie Lutz, Stefan R Rowniak, Prabjot Sandhu
In the 25 years since advance care planning first drew the attention of the national healthcare and legal systems, gains in the rate of advance care directive completion have been negligible despite the effort of researchers, ethicists, and lawmakers. With the benefit of sophisticated healthcare technology, patients are living longer. Despite the benefits of increased longevity, it is widely acknowledged that enough has not been done to adequately address end-of-life care decisions at the crossroads between medical futility and quality of life...
December 29, 2017: Journal of Religion and Health
Katrien Devolder, Thomas Douglas
Bioethicists sometimes defend compromise positions, particularly when they enter debates on applied topics that have traditionally been highly polarised, such as those regarding abortion, euthanasia and embryonic stem cell research. However, defending compromise positions is often regarded with a degree of disdain. Many are intuitively attracted to the view that it is almost always problematic to defend compromise positions, in the sense that we have a significant moral reason not to do so. In this paper, we consider whether this common sense view can be given a principled basis...
February 2018: Bioethics
Giulio Mecacci, Pim Haselager
Contemporary brain reading technologies promise to provide the possibility to decode and interpret mental states and processes. Brain reading could have numerous societally relevant implications. In particular, the private character of mind might be affected, generating ethical and legal concerns. This paper aims at equipping ethicists and policy makers with conceptual tools to support an evaluation of the potential applicability and the implications of current and near future brain reading technology. We start with clarifying the concepts of mind reading and brain reading, and the different kinds of mental states that could in principle be read...
December 15, 2017: Science and Engineering Ethics
Eva van Reenen, Inge van Nistelrooij
BACKGROUND: Nursing Ethics has featured several discussions on what good care comprises and how to achieve good care practices. We should "nurse" ethics by continuously reflecting on the way we "do" ethics, which is what care ethicists have been doing over the past few decades and continue to do so. Ethics is not limited to nursing but extends to all caring professions. In 2011, Elin Martinsen argued in this journal that care should be included as a core concept in medical ethical terminology because of "the harm to which patients may be exposed owing to a lack of care in the clinical encounter," specifically between doctors and patients...
January 1, 2017: Nursing Ethics
Sandra Marquez Hall, Janet Lieto, Roy Martin
During a mandatory fourth-year core geriatric medicine rotation at our medical school, we discovered that our medical students were struggling with end-of-life (EOL) issues both personally and professionally. We implemented curriculum changes to assist them in developing emotional awareness about death and dying, and to help develop their ability to respond personally and professionally to patients and their families during EOL experiences.In our new curriculum, a seasoned ethicist at our university conducts 2 educational sessions addressing EOL issues...
2017: Permanente Journal
Thomas P Sartwelle, James C Johnston, Berna Arda
Bioethics abolished the prevailing Hippocratic tenet instructing physicians to make treatment decisions, replacing it with autonomy through informed consent. Informed consent allows the patient to choose treatment after options are explained by the physician. The appearance of bioethics in 1970 coincided with the introduction of electronic fetal monitoring (EFM), which evolved to become the fetal surveillance modality of choice for virtually all women in labor. Autonomy rapidly pervaded all medical procedures, but there was a clear exemption for EFM...
2017: Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology
Berit Bringedal, Karin Isaksson Rø, Morten Magelssen, Reidun Førde, Olaf Gjerløv Aasland
BACKGROUND: We present and discuss the results of a Norwegian survey of medical doctors' views on potential ethical dilemmas in professional practice. METHODS: The study was conducted in 2015 as a postal questionnaire to a representative sample of 1612 doctors, among which 1261 responded (78%). We provided a list of 41 potential ethical dilemmas and asked whether each was considered a dilemma, and whether the doctor would perform the task, if in a position to do so...
November 18, 2017: Journal of Medical Ethics
Peter A Ubel, Karen A Scherr, Angela Fagerlin
Many health care decisions depend not only upon medical facts, but also on value judgments-patient goals and preferences. Until recent decades, patients relied on doctors to tell them what to do. Then ethicists and others convinced clinicians to adopt a paradigm shift in medical practice, to recognize patient autonomy, by orienting decision making toward the unique goals of individual patients. Unfortunately, current medical practice often falls short of empowering patients. In this article, we reflect on whether the current state of medical decision making effectively promotes patients' health care goals...
November 2017: American Journal of Bioethics: AJOB
Matthé Scholten, Jakov Gather
It is widely accepted among medical ethicists that competence is a necessary condition for informed consent. In this view, if a patient is incompetent to make a particular treatment decision, the decision must be based on an advance directive or made by a substitute decision-maker on behalf of the patient. We call this the competence model. According to a recent report of the United Nations (UN) High Commissioner for Human Rights, article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) presents a wholesale rejection of the competence model...
October 25, 2017: Journal of Medical Ethics
Lantz Fleming Miller
A dissociated area of medical research warrants bioethical consideration: a proposed transplantation of a donor's entire body, except head, to a patient with a fatal degenerative disease. The seeming improbability of such an operation can only underscore the need for thorough bioethical assessment: Not assessing a case of such potential ethical import, by showing neglect instead of facing the issue, can only compound the ethical predicament, perhaps eroding public trust in ethical medicine. This article discusses the historical background of full-body transplantation, documents the seriousness of its current pursuit, and builds an argument for why prima facie this type of transplant is bioethically distinct...
October 23, 2017: New Bioethics: a Multidisciplinary Journal of Biotechnology and the Body
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