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barriers to health

James L Hoggan, David A Sabatini, Tohren C G Kibbey
Recent developments in nanotechnology have seen an increase in the use of manufactured nanomaterials. Although their unique physicochemical properties are desirable for many products and applications, concern continues to exist about their environmental fate and potential to cause risk to human and ecological health. The purpose of this work was to examine one aspect of nanomaterial environmental fate: transport and retention in the unsaturated zone during drainage. The work made use of tall segmented columns packed with layers of two different porous media, one medium sand and one fine sand...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Contaminant Hydrology
Lisa I Iezzoni
Erroneous assumptions among health care professionals about the daily lives, preferences, values, and expectations of persons with disability can contribute to documented health care disparities, faulty communication, and substandard quality of care affecting this heterogeneous population. Efforts to reduce racial and ethnic disparities have focused on expanding diversity in the physician workforce. Would expanding the numbers of physicians with disability benefit patients with disability? Increasing the number of physicians who identify as "disabled" is one strategy for proactively confronting disability-related barriers affecting patients, but such efforts will likely face substantial challenges...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Patricia M Davidson, Cynda Hylton Rushton, Jennifer Dotzenrod, Christina A Godack, Deborah Baker, Marie N Nolan
The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability and requires schools to provide reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. The profession of nursing is striving for diversity and inclusion, but barriers still exist to realizing accommodations for people with disabilities. Promoting disclosure, a supportive and enabling environment, resilience, and realistic expectations are important considerations if we are to include among our ranks health professionals who can understand, based on similar life experiences of disability, a fuller range of perspectives of the patients we care for...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Julia Campbell, John J M Dwyer, Jason B Coe
Promoting dog walking among dog owners is consistent with One Health, which focuses on the mutual health benefits of the human-animal relationship for people and animals. In this study, we used intervention mapping (a framework to develop programs and resources for health promotion) to develop a clearer understanding of the determinants of dog walking to develop curricular and educational resources for promoting regular dog walking among dog owners. Twenty-six adult dog owners in Ontario participated in a semi-structured interview about dog walking in 2014...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Veterinary Medical Education
J S Yu, A Y Xue, E E Redei, N Bagheri
Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a critical cause of morbidity and disability with an economic cost of hundreds of billions of dollars each year, necessitating more effective treatment strategies and novel approaches to translational research. A notable barrier in addressing this public health threat involves reliable identification of the disorder, as many affected individuals remain undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. An objective blood-based diagnostic test using transcript levels of a panel of markers would provide an invaluable tool for MDD as the infrastructure-including equipment, trained personnel, billing, and governmental approval-for similar tests is well established in clinics worldwide...
October 25, 2016: Translational Psychiatry
C Emily Hendrick, Joseph E Potter
BACKGROUND: Breastfeeding is associated with numerous health benefits for the infant and mother. Latina women in the United States have historically had high overall rates of initiation and duration of breastfeeding. However, these rates vary by nativity and time lived in the United States. Exclusive breastfeeding patterns among Latina women are unclear. In this study, we investigate the current and exclusive breastfeeding patterns of Mexican-origin women at four time points from delivery to 10 months postpartum to determine the combined association of nativity and country of education with breastfeeding duration and supplementation...
October 25, 2016: Birth
Akihiro Nishio, Ryo Horita, Tadahiro Sado, Seiko Mizutani, Takahiro Watanabe, Ryosuke Uehara, Mayumi Yamamoto
AIMS: Many studies have reported that the prevalence of mental illness and cognitive disability is higher among homeless individuals compared to the general population, and the rates of mental illness among the homeless population have recently increased. This study compared causes of homelessness or barriers to escaping homelessness for people with/without mental illness/cognitive disability, revealed problems with the Japanese homeless policy, and proposed an effective and necessary support system...
October 24, 2016: Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Erica E M Maurits, Anke J E de Veer, Peter P Groenewegen, Anneke L Francke
BACKGROUND: Professional misconduct in healthcare, a (generally) lasting situation in which patients are at risk or actually harmed, can jeopardise the health and well-being of patients and the quality of teamwork. Two types of professional misconduct can be distinguished: misconduct associated with incompetence and that associated with impairment. This study aimed to (1) quantify home-care nursing staff's experiences with actual or possible professional misconduct; (2) provide insight into the difficulty home-care nursing staff experience in reporting suspicions of professional misconduct within the organisation and whether this is related to the individual characteristics of nursing staff; and (3) show which aspects of professional practice home-care nursing staff consider important in preventing professional misconduct...
2016: BMC Nursing
Tyra Bryant-Stephens, Shakira Reed-Wells, Maryori Canales, Luzmercy Perez, A Russell Localio, Andrea J Apter
Research on asthma frequently recruits patients from clinics because the ready pool of patients leads to easy access to patients in office waiting areas, emergency departments, or hospital wards. Patients with other chronic conditions, and with mobility problems, face exposures at home that are not easily identified at the clinic. In this paper we describe the perspective of the community health workers and challenges they encountered when making home visits while implementing a research intervention in a cohort of low-income, minority patients...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Stacy Cooper Bailey, Michael K Paasche-Orlow, William G Adams, Samantha A Brokenshire, Ryan P Hickson, Christine U Oramasionwu, Laura M Curtis, Mary J Kwasny, Michael S Wolf
BACKGROUND: Adverse drug events (ADEs) affect millions of patients annually and place a significant burden on the healthcare system. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has developed patient safety information for high-risk medications that pose serious public health concerns. However, there are currently few assurances that patients receive this information or are able to identify or respond correctly to ADEs. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of the Electronic Medication Complete Communication (EMC(2)) Strategy to promote safe medication use and reporting of ADEs in comparison to usual care...
October 21, 2016: Contemporary Clinical Trials
Mary E Cooley, Mary Lou Siefert
OBJECTIVES: To discuss multiple co-occurring cancer symptoms, review symptom assessment instruments, identify innovative methods to integrate symptom assessment and management in the clinical setting, and examine barriers and facilitators for implementation of symptom assessment and use of clinical practice guidelines. DATA SOURCES: Peer-reviewed articles, guidelines, systematic reviews, and web-based resources. CONCLUSION: Despite the availability of brief, reliable, and valid instruments, symptom assessment has not been integrated as a routine aspect of clinical care...
October 21, 2016: Seminars in Oncology Nursing
Victoria L Ewing, Rachel Tolhurst, Andrew Kapinda, Esther Richards, Dianne J Terlouw, David G Lalloo
BACKGROUND: This study used qualitative methods to investigate the relationship between geographic access and gendered intra-household hierarchies and how these influence treatment-seeking decision-making for childhood fever within the Chikwawa district of Malawi. Previous cross-sectional survey findings in the district indicated that distance from facility and associated costs are important determinants of health facility attendance in the district. This paper uses qualitative data to add depth of understanding to these findings by exploring the relationship between distance from services, anticipated costs and cultural norms of intra-household decision-making, and to identify potential intervention opportunities to reduce challenges experienced by those in remote locations...
October 24, 2016: Malaria Journal
Alberto Larocca, Roberto Moro Visconti, Michele Marconi
BACKGROUND: Rural populations experience several barriers to accessing clinical facilities for malaria diagnosis. Increasing penetration of ICT and mobile-phones and subsequent m-Health applications can contribute overcoming such obstacles. METHODS: GIS is used to evaluate the feasibility of m-Health technologies as part of anti-malaria strategies. This study investigates where in Uganda: (1) malaria affects the largest number of people; (2) the application of m-Health protocol based on the mobile network has the highest potential impact...
October 24, 2016: Malaria Journal
Arianna Rubin Means, Julie Jacobson, Aryc W Mosher, Judd L Walson
BACKGROUND: While some evidence supports the beneficial effects of integrating neglected tropical disease (NTD) programs to optimize coverage and reduce costs, there is minimal information regarding when or how to effectively operationalize program integration. The lack of systematic analyses of integration experiences and of integration processes may act as an impediment to achieving more effective NTD programming. We aimed to learn about the experiences of NTD stakeholders and their perceptions of integration...
October 2016: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Megan Quinn, Sheila Gephart
BACKGROUND: Palliative care is a holistic framework that is designed to improve quality of life by identifying and treating distressing symptoms of life-threatening or complex conditions. Neonatal palliative care (NPC) has potential benefits for parents, staff, and patients, yet evidence suggests that implementation and utilization of organized NPC services are low. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to answer the clinical question: In neonatal intensive care, what evidence can be used to guide implementation of palliative care protocols? SEARCH STRATEGY: A literature search was conducted using CINAHL (Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature), PubMed, and the Cochrane Library databases...
October 22, 2016: Advances in Neonatal Care: Official Journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses
Christian Young, Hasantha Gunasekera, Kelvin Kong, Alison Purcell, Sumithra Muthayya, Frank Vincent, Darryl Wright, Raylene Gordon, Jennifer Bell, Guy Gillor, Julie Booker, Peter Fernando, Deanna Kalucy, Simone Sherriff, Allison Tong, Carmen Parter, Sandra Bailey, Sally Redman, Emily Banks, Jonathan C Craig
OBJECTIVE: To describe and evaluate Hearing EAr health and Language Services (HEALS), a New South Wales (NSW) health initiative implemented in 2013 and 2014 as a model for enhanced clinical services arising from Aboriginal health research. METHODS: A case-study involving a mixed-methods evaluation of the origins and outcomes of HEALS, a collaboration among five NSW Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services (ACCHS), the Sydney Children's Hospitals Network, NSW Health, the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council, and local service providers...
October 23, 2016: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
Claudia Chaufan, Andrew J Karter, Howard H Moffet, Judy Quan, Melissa M Parker, Jenna Kruger, Dean Schillinger, Alicia Fernandez
OBJECTIVES: Language barriers negatively impact health care access and quality for US immigrants. Latinos are the second largest immigrant group and the largest, fastest growing minority. Health care systems need simple, low cost and accurate tools that they can use to identify physicians with Spanish language competence. We sought to address this need by validating a simple and low-cost tool already in use in a major health plan. DESIGN SETTING PARTICIPANTS: A web-based survey conducted in 2012 among physicians caring for patients in a large, integrated health care delivery system...
October 20, 2016: Ethnicity & Disease
J Aaron Hipp, Alyssa Bird, Margaret van Bakergem, Elizabeth Yarnall
Popularity of Open Streets, temporarily opening streets to communities and closing streets to vehicles, in the US has recently surged. As of January 2016, 122 cities have hosted an Open Streets program. Even with this great expansion, the sustainability of Open Streets remains a challenge in many cities and overall Open Streets in the US differ from their successful counterparts in Central and South America. Between summer 2015 and winter 2016, we reviewed the websites and social media of the 122 identified programs and interviewed 32 unique Open Streets programs...
October 20, 2016: Preventive Medicine
Andrés F Henao-Martínez, Kathryn Colborn, Gabriel Parra-Henao
Chagas disease is a complex tropical parasitic infection. It affects a significant portion of the population in Latin America, especially in areas of poverty and poor access to health care. It also affects immigrants in high-income countries who lack access to health care due to their legal status. Millions of people are at risk of contracting the disease, and approximately 30 % of chronically infected patients will develop cardiomyopathy. The cost of caring for patients that have been infected is substantial...
October 22, 2016: Parasitology Research
Rimante Ronto, Lauren Ball, Donna Pendergast, Neil Harris
The high school setting has been identified as an ideal setting to teach adolescents about healthy dietary behaviours. This study explored home economics teachers' (HETs) views on the role of high schools in enhancing adolescents' food literacy and promoting healthy dietary behaviours. Semi-structured interviews with 22 HETs were conducted. The interview questions focused on the perceived strengths/opportunities and the limitations/barriers in enhancing adolescents' food literacy and healthy dietary behaviours in Australian high schools...
October 19, 2016: Appetite
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