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Neural correlates of consciousness

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28760626/how-do-the-brain-s-time-and-space-mediate-consciousness-and-its-different-dimensions-temporo-spatial-theory-of-consciousness-ttc
#1
REVIEW
Georg Northoff, Zirui Huang
Time and space are the basic building blocks of nature. As a unique existent in nature, our brain exists in time and takes up space. The brain's activity itself also constitutes and spreads in its own (intrinsic) time and space that is crucial for consciousness. Consciousness is a complex phenomenon including different dimensions: level/state, content/form, phenomenal aspects, and cognitive features. We propose a Temporo-spatial Theory of Consciousness (TTC) focusing primarily on the temporal and spatial features of the brain activity...
July 28, 2017: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28759805/common-and-distinct-neural-mechanisms-associated-with-the-conscious-experience-of-vicarious-pain
#2
Thomas Grice-Jackson, Hugo D Critchley, Michael J Banissy, Jamie Ward
Vicarious pain perception has been an influential paradigm for investigating the social neuroscience of empathy. This research has highlighted the importance of both shared representations (i.e., involved in both experiencing first-hand physical pain and observing pain) and mechanisms that discriminate between self and other. The majority of this research has been conducted in healthy younger adults using a group-average approach. There are, however, known inter-individual differences that can contribute to vicarious experience...
July 3, 2017: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28756954/illusory-jitter-perceived-at-the-frequency-of-alpha-oscillations
#3
Sorato Minami, Kaoru Amano
Neural oscillations, such as alpha (8-13 Hz), beta (13-30 Hz), and gamma (30-100 Hz), are widespread across cortical areas, and their possible functional roles include feature binding [1], neuronal communication [2, 3], and memory [1, 4]. The most prominent signal among these neural oscillations is the alpha oscillation. Although accumulating evidence suggests that alpha oscillations correlate with various aspects of visual processing [5-18], the number of studies proving their causal contribution in visual perception is limited [11, 16-18]...
August 7, 2017: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28753443/activity-in-part-of-the-neural-correlates-of-consciousness-reflects-integration
#4
Johan Eriksson
Integration is commonly viewed as a key process for generating conscious experiences. Accordingly, there should be increased activity within the neural correlates of consciousness when demands on integration increase. We used fMRI and "informational masking" to isolate the neural correlates of consciousness and measured how the associated brain activity changed as a function of required integration. Integration was manipulated by comparing the experience of hearing simple reoccurring tones to hearing harmonic tone triplets...
July 25, 2017: Consciousness and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28740471/no-evidence-of-narrowly-defined-cognitive-penetrability-in-unambiguous-vision
#5
Nikki A Lammers, Edward H de Haan, Yair Pinto
The classical notion of cognitive impenetrability suggests that perceptual processing is an automatic modular system and not under conscious control. Near consensus is now emerging that this classical notion is untenable. However, as recently pointed out by Firestone and Scholl, this consensus is built on quicksand. In most studies claiming perception is cognitively penetrable, it remains unclear which actual process has been affected (perception, memory, imagery, input selection or judgment). In fact, the only available "proofs" for cognitive penetrability are proxies for perception, such as behavioral responses and neural correlates...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28737503/directional-connectivity-in-the-eeg-is-able-to-discriminate-wakefulness-from-nrem-sleep
#6
Giulia Lioi, Steven L Bell, David C Smith, David M Simpson
A reliable measure of consciousness is of great interest for various clinical applications including sleep studies and the assessment of depth of anaesthesia. A number of measures of consciousness based on the EEG have been proposed in the literature and tested in studies of dreamless sleep, general anaesthesia and disorders of consciousness. However, reliability has remained a persistent challenge. Despite considerable theoretical and experimental effort, the neural mechanisms underlying consciousness remain unclear, but connectivity between brain regions is thought to be disrupted, impairing information flow...
July 24, 2017: Physiological Measurement
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28736543/oscillatory-correlates-of-visual-consciousness
#7
REVIEW
Stefano Gallotto, Alexander T Sack, Teresa Schuhmann, Tom A de Graaf
Conscious experiences are linked to activity in our brain: the neural correlates of consciousness (NCC). Empirical research on these NCCs covers a wide range of brain activity signals, measures, and methodologies. In this paper, we focus on spontaneous brain oscillations; rhythmic fluctuations of neuronal (population) activity which can be characterized by a range of parameters, such as frequency, amplitude (power), and phase. We provide an overview of oscillatory measures that appear to correlate with conscious perception...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28684334/just-a-thought-how-mind-wandering-is-represented-in-dynamic-brain-connectivity
#8
REVIEW
Aaron Kucyi
The neuroscience of mind-wandering has begun to flourish, with roles of brain regions and networks being defined for various components of spontaneous thought. However, often underappreciated is that most of brain activity does not represent immediately occurring thoughts. Instead, spontaneous, organized network activity largely reflects "intrinsic" functions that are unrelated to the current experience. There remains no consensus on how brain networks represent mind-wandering in parallel to functioning in other ongoing, predominantly unconscious processes...
July 3, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28666351/brain-networks-predict-metabolism-diagnosis-and-prognosis-at-the-bedside-in-disorders-of-consciousness
#9
Srivas Chennu, Jitka Annen, Sarah Wannez, Aurore Thibaut, Camille Chatelle, Helena Cassol, Géraldine Martens, Caroline Schnakers, Olivia Gosseries, David Menon, Steven Laureys
Recent advances in functional neuroimaging have demonstrated novel potential for informing diagnosis and prognosis in the unresponsive wakeful syndrome and minimally conscious states. However, these technologies come with considerable expense and difficulty, limiting the possibility of wider clinical application in patients. Here, we show that high density electroencephalography, collected from 104 patients measured at rest, can provide valuable information about brain connectivity that correlates with behaviour and functional neuroimaging...
June 27, 2017: Brain: a Journal of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28649298/neuroimaging-the-traumatized-self-fmri-reveals-altered-response-in-cortical-midline-structures-and-occipital-cortex-during-visual-and-verbal-self-and-other-referential-processing-in-women-with-ptsd
#10
Paul Frewen, Elizabeth Thornley, Daniela Rabellino, Ruth Lanius
Background: Changes to the diagnostic criteria for PTSD in DSM-5 reflect an increased emphasis on negative cognition referring to self and other, including self-blame, and related pervasive negative affective states including for self-conscious emotions such as guilt and shame. Objective: Investigate the neural correlates of valenced self-referential processing (SRP) and other-referential processing (ORP) in persons with PTSD. Method: We compared response to the Visual-Verbal Self-Other Referential Processing Task in an fMRI study of women with (n = 20) versus without (n = 24) PTSD primarily relating to childhood and interpersonal trauma histories using statistical parametric mapping and group independent component analysis...
2017: European Journal of Psychotraumatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28638328/protocol-for-the-reconstructing-consciousness-and-cognition-reccognition-study
#11
Kaitlyn L Maier, Andrew R McKinstry-Wu, Ben Julian A Palanca, Vijay Tarnal, Stefanie Blain-Moraes, Mathias Basner, Michael S Avidan, George A Mashour, Max B Kelz
Important scientific and clinical questions persist about general anesthesia despite the ubiquitous clinical use of anesthetic drugs in humans since their discovery. For example, it is not known how the brain reconstitutes consciousness and cognition after the profound functional perturbation of the anesthetized state, nor has a specific pattern of functional recovery been characterized. To date, there has been a lack of detailed investigation into rates of recovery and the potential orderly return of attention, sensorimotor function, memory, reasoning and logic, abstract thinking, and processing speed...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28619656/the-large-scale-functional-connectivity-correlates-of-consciousness-and-arousal-during-the-healthy-and-pathological-human-sleep-cycle
#12
REVIEW
Enzo Tagliazucchi, Eus J W van Someren
Advances in neuroimaging have greatly improved our understanding of human sleep from a systems neuroscience perspective. However, cognition and awareness are reduced during sleep, hindering the applicability of standard task-based paradigms. Methods recently developed to study spontaneous brain activity fluctuations have proven useful to overcome this limitation. In this review, we focus on the concept of functional connectivity (FC, i.e. statistical covariance between brain activity signals) and its application to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired during sleep...
June 12, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28604786/tinnitus-alters-resting-state-functional-connectivity-rsfc-in-human-auditory-and-non-auditory-brain-regions-as-measured-by-functional-near-infrared-spectroscopy-fnirs
#13
Juan San Juan, Xiao-Su Hu, Mohamad Issa, Silvia Bisconti, Ioulia Kovelman, Paul Kileny, Gregory Basura
Tinnitus, or phantom sound perception, leads to increased spontaneous neural firing rates and enhanced synchrony in central auditory circuits in animal models. These putative physiologic correlates of tinnitus to date have not been well translated in the brain of the human tinnitus sufferer. Using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) we recently showed that tinnitus in humans leads to maintained hemodynamic activity in auditory and adjacent, non-auditory cortices. Here we used fNIRS technology to investigate changes in resting state functional connectivity between human auditory and non-auditory brain regions in normal-hearing, bilateral subjective tinnitus and controls before and after auditory stimulation...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28591822/neural-sources-and-underlying-mechanisms-of-neural-responses-to-heartbeats-and-their-role-in-bodily-self-consciousness-an-intracranial-eeg-study
#14
Hyeong-Dong Park, Fosco Bernasconi, Roy Salomon, Catherine Tallon-Baudry, Laurent Spinelli, Margitta Seeck, Karl Schaller, Olaf Blanke
Recent research has shown that heartbeat-evoked potentials (HEPs), brain activity in response to heartbeats, are a useful neural measure for investigating the functional role of brain-body interactions in cognitive processes including self-consciousness. In 2 experiments, using intracranial electroencephalography (EEG), we investigated (1) the neural sources of HEPs, (2) the underlying mechanisms for HEP generation, and (3) the functional role of HEPs in bodily self-consciousness. In Experiment-1, we found that shortly after the heartbeat onset, phase distributions across single trials were significantly concentrated in 10% of the recording sites, mainly in the insula and the operculum, but also in other regions including the amygdala and fronto-temporal cortex...
June 7, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28588463/looking-for-the-self-phenomenology-neurophysiology-and-philosophical-significance-of-drug-induced-ego-dissolution
#15
Raphaël Millière
There is converging evidence that high doses of hallucinogenic drugs can produce significant alterations of self-experience, described as the dissolution of the sense of self and the loss of boundaries between self and world. This article discusses the relevance of this phenomenon, known as "drug-induced ego dissolution (DIED)", for cognitive neuroscience, psychology and philosophy of mind. Data from self-report questionnaires suggest that three neuropharmacological classes of drugs can induce ego dissolution: classical psychedelics, dissociative anesthetics and agonists of the kappa opioid receptor (KOR)...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28560156/neural-signature-of-coma-revealed-by-posteromedial-cortex-connection-density-analysis
#16
Briguita Malagurski, Patrice Péran, Benjamine Sarton, Beatrice Riu, Leslie Gonzalez, Fanny Vardon-Bounes, Thierry Seguin, Thomas Geeraerts, Olivier Fourcade, Francesco de Pasquale, Stein Silva
Posteromedial cortex (PMC) is a highly segregated and dynamic core, which appears to play a critical role in internally/externally directed cognitive processes, including conscious awareness. Nevertheless, neuroimaging studies on acquired disorders of consciousness, have traditionally explored PMC as a homogenous and indivisible structure. We suggest that a fine-grained description of intrinsic PMC topology during coma, could expand our understanding about how this cortical hub contributes to consciousness generation and maintain, and could permit the identification of specific markers related to brain injury mechanism and useful for neurological prognostication...
2017: NeuroImage: Clinical
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28557691/different-electrophysiological-correlates-of-visual-awareness-for-detection-and-identification
#17
Mika Koivisto, Simone Grassini, Niina Salminen-Vaparanta, Antti Revonsuo
Detecting the presence of an object is a different process than identifying the object as a particular object. This difference has not been taken into account in designing experiments on the neural correlates of consciousness. We compared the electrophysiological correlates of conscious detection and identification directly by measuring ERPs while participants performed either a task only requiring the conscious detection of the stimulus or a higher-level task requiring its conscious identification. Behavioral results showed that, even if the stimulus was consciously detected, it was not necessarily identified...
September 2017: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28554797/juxtaposing-the-real-time-unfolding-of-subjective-experience-and-erp-neuromarker-dynamics
#18
Renate Rutiku, Talis Bachmann
Electroencephalographic (EEG) potentials have remained a valuable source of data and theories concerning neural correlates of consciousness (NCC). The EEG based methods are far from being exhausted and are continually valuable in the quest for the markers of NCC. To set the background for the research presented in this issue, we review the published work on EEG-based markers of NCC. The article is organized according to the principle of the time-course aspect of brain potentials with regard to the stimuli for which subject's awareness is experimentally measured and/or manipulated...
May 26, 2017: Consciousness and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28553118/psychosis-in-parkinsonism-an-unorthodox-approach
#19
REVIEW
Marco Onofrj, Danilo Carrozzino, Aurelio D'Amico, Roberta Di Giacomo, Stefano Delli Pizzi, Astrid Thomas, Valeria Onofrj, John-Paul Taylor, Laura Bonanni
Psychosis in Parkinson's disease (PD) is currently considered as the occurrence of hallucinations and delusions. The historical meaning of the term psychosis was, however, broader, encompassing a disorganization of both consciousness and personality, including behavior abnormalities, such as impulsive overactivity and catatonia, in complete definitions by the International Classification of Diseases-10 (ICD-10) and the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). Our review is aimed at reminding that complex psychotic symptoms, including impulsive overactivity and somatoform disorders (the last being a recent controversial entity in PD), were carefully described in postencephalitic parkinsonism (PEP), many decades before dopaminergic treatment era, and are now described in other parkinsonisms than PD...
2017: Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544942/behavioural-and-neural-evidence-for-the-impact-of-fluency-context-on-conscious-memory
#20
Carlos Alexandre Gomes, Axel Mecklinger, Hubert Zimmer
It has been recently suggested that fluency may impact recognition memory performance when the fluency context varies from trial-to-trial. Surprisingly, such an effect has proved difficult to detect in the masked priming paradigm, one of the most popular means to increase fluency-based memory judgements. We conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiment in which participants encoded words at study and, at test, performed a recognition memory task within a masked priming procedure. In order to optimise the chances of finding priming effects on recognition memory performance, we used low-frequency words, which have been shown to increase hits relative to false alarms and enhance masked priming effects...
April 21, 2017: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
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