Read by QxMD icon Read

Aerobic interval training

Martin J MacInnis, Martin J Gibala
Interval exercise typically involves repeated bouts of relatively intense exercise interspersed by short periods of recovery. A common classification scheme subdivides this method into high-intensity interval training (HIIT; 'near maximal' efforts) and sprint interval training (SIT; 'supramaximal' efforts). Both forms of interval training induce the classic physiological adaptations characteristic of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) such as increased aerobic capacity (VO2max ) and mitochondrial content...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Physiology
Francesco Giallauria, Neil Andrew Smart, Antonio Cittadini, Carlo Vigorito
Exercise training (ET) is strongly recommended in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Moderate-intensity aerobic continuous ET is the best established training modality in CHF patients. In the last decade, however, high-intensity interval exercise training (HIIT) has aroused considerable interest in cardiac rehabilitation community. Basically, HIIT consists of repeated bouts of high-intensity exercise alternated with recovery periods. In CHF patients, HIIT exerts larger improvements in exercise capacity compared to moderate-continuous ET...
October 14, 2016: Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease, Archivio Monaldi Per le Malattie del Torace
Ana Abreu, Helena Santa Clara
Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established treatment for patients with moderate-to-severe chronic heart failure (CHF) and intraventricular conduction delay, which is identified by a QRS interval of 120msec or more on a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG). CRT improved functional capacity, reduced hospitalizations for worsening CHF and increased survival. However, about 30-40% of patients who underwent CRT were non-responders with no clinical or echocardiographic improvement. Imaging parameters for prediction of CRT response have been reviewed...
October 14, 2016: Monaldi Archives for Chest Disease, Archivio Monaldi Per le Malattie del Torace
Hailee L Wingfield, Abbie E Smith-Ryan, Malia N Melvin, Erica J Roelofs, Eric T Trexler, Anthony C Hackney, Mark A Weaver, Eric D Ryan
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise modality and pre-exercise carbohydrate (CHO) or protein (PRO) ingestion on post-exercise resting energy expenditure (REE) and respiratory exchange ratio (RER) in women. METHODS: Twenty recreationally active women (mean ± SD; age 24.6 ± 3.9 years; height 164.4 ± 6.6 cm; weight 62.7 ± 6.6 kg) participated in this randomized, crossover, double-blind study. Each participant completed six exercise sessions, consisting of three exercise modalities: aerobic endurance exercise (AEE), high-intensity interval running (HIIT), and high-intensity resistance training (HIRT); and two acute nutritional interventions: CHO and PRO...
December 2015: Sports Medicine—Open
Patrick S Tucker, Aaron T Scanlan, Rebecca K Vella, Vincent J Dalbo
BACKGROUND: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an irreversible disease that diminishes length and quality of life. Emerging evidence suggests CKD progression and genomic integrity are inversely and causally related. To reduce health complications related to CKD progression, chronic aerobic exercise is often recommended. To date, appraisals of differing modes of exercise, along with postulations regarding the mechanisms responsible for observed effects, are lacking. In order to examine the ability of aerobic exercise to encourage improvements in genomic integrity, we evaluated the effects of 8 weeks of high-intensity interval training (HIIT; 85 % VO2max), low intensity training (LIT; 45-50 % VO2max), and sedentary behaviour (SED), in an animal model of early-stage CKD...
December 2016: Sports Medicine—Open
Christoph Zinner, David Morales-Alamo, Niels Ørtenblad, Filip J Larsen, Tomas A Schiffer, Sarah J Willis, Miriam Gelabert-Rebato, Mario Perez-Valera, Robert Boushel, Jose A L Calbet, Hans-Christer Holmberg
To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the differences in adaptation of arm and leg muscles to sprint training, over a period of 11 days 16 untrained men performed six sessions of 4-6 × 30-s all-out sprints (SIT) with the legs and arms, separately, with a 1-h interval of recovery. Limb-specific VO2peak, sprint performance (two 30-s Wingate tests with 4-min recovery), muscle efficiency and time-trial performance (TT, 5-min all-out) were assessed and biopsies from the m. vastus lateralis and m. triceps brachii taken before and after training...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
Cian McGinley, David John Bishop
This study measured the adaptive response to exercise training for each of the acid/base transport protein families, including providing isoform-specific evidence for the monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)1/4 chaperone protein basigin and for the electrogenic sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe)1. We investigated whether 4 weeks of work-matched, high-intensity interval training (HIIT), performed either just above the lactate threshold (HIITΔ20; n = 8), or close to peak aerobic power (HIITΔ90; n = 8), influenced adaptations in acid/base transport protein abundance, non-bicarbonate muscle buffer capacity (βmin vitro), and exercise capacity in active men...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Applied Physiology
Cian McGinley, David J Bishop
To better understand training-induced adaptations in skeletal muscle pH regulation, this study measured protein and mRNA kinetics of proton (H(+) ) transporters for 72 h following a bout of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE), conducted after 4 weeks of similar training. We also assayed muscle buffer capacity (βm) by titration technique (βmin vitro ) over the same period. Sixteen active men cycled for 7 × 2 min at ∼80% of peak aerobic power, interspersed with 1 min rest. Compared to the first 9 h post-exercise, monocarboxylate transporter (MCT)1 protein content was ∼1...
September 30, 2016: Experimental Physiology
Étienne Ojardias, Oscar Azeo, Diana Rimaud, Pascal Giraux
OBJECTIVE: Transcortical direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an emerging technique in the rehabilitation of hemiplegic patients after stroke, and has been mainly evaluated for the upper limb. The feasibility and tolerance of the use of repeated stimulations on the lower limb motor cortex require a clinical evaluation. OBSERVATIONS: A 72-year-old patient, who suffered from a first ischemic stroke in the left middle cerebral artery area, on July 2015, was admitted, 6 months post-stroke, to the PRM outpatient clinic of the university hospital of Saint-Étienne, for a motor training program combined with iterative tDCS stimulations...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Julien Feurer
OBJECTIVE: Obesity, being a world epidemic, is responsible for an increased risk of mortality and various comorbidities. The loss of weight, particularly of body fat, would lower this risk. This is why we have developed an aerobic, resistance and interval training program over a 6-week period whose main goal is to reduce body fat by 5%. MATERIAL/PATIENTS AND METHODS: We have assessed the evolution of body fat by bioelectrical impedance analysis, of [Formula: see text] by a cardiac stress test on a cycle ergometer, of leg muscular strength, of quality of life by the SF-36 health survey, in 20 sedentary, moderately to severely obese patients between the age of 18 and 70years old, before and after a 6-week training program mixing aerobic, resistance and interval training exercises for 45minutes, twice daily and 5days per week, with a food rebalancing with normocaloric diet...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
S Tsitkanou, K Spengos, A-N Stasinaki, N Zaras, G Bogdanis, G Papadimas, G Terzis
Aim of the study was to investigate whether high-intensity interval cycling performed immediately after resistance training would inhibit muscle strength increase and hypertrophy expected from resistance training per se. Twenty-two young men were assigned into either resistance training (RE; N = 11) or resistance training plus high-intensity interval cycling (REC; N = 11). Lower body muscle strength and rate of force development (RFD), quadriceps cross-sectional area (CSA) and vastus lateralis muscle architecture, muscle fiber type composition and capillarization, and estimated aerobic capacity were evaluated before and after 8 weeks of training (2 times per week)...
September 23, 2016: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
Mahmoud Nikseresht, Mohammad Reza Hafezi Ahmadi, Mehdi Hedayati
This study compared the effects of nonlinear resistance training (NRT), aerobic interval training (AIT), and detraining on adipokines and cardiometabolic risk factors in middle-aged obese men. Thirty-three obese men were randomly allocated to NRT (n = 12), AIT (n = 10), and control (CON, n = 11) groups. Subjects in experimental groups performed exercise protocols 3 days per week for 12 weeks followed by a 4-week detraining period. The NRT involved 55 min of weight training with flexible periodization. The AIT consisted of running on a treadmill (4 × 4-min intervals at 90% of maximal heart rate, with each interval separated by 3 min at 65%)...
October 2016: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
Jerome L Fleg
Although moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) has been the traditional model for aerobic exercise training for over four decades, a growing body of literature has demonstrated equal if not greater improvement in aerobic capacity and similar beneficial effects on body composition, glucose metabolism, blood pressure, and quality of life from high-intensity interval training (HIIT). An advantage of HIIT over MICT is the shorter time required to perform the same amount of energy expenditure. The current brief review summarizes the effects of HIIT on peak aerobic capacity and cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults and those with various cardiovascular diseases, including coronary artery disease, chronic heart failure, and post heart transplantation...
2016: F1000Research
Andreas Zafeiridis, Anastasia Chrysovalantou Chatziioannou, Haralambos Sarivasiliou, Antonios Kyparos, Michalis G Nikolaidis, Ioannis S Vrabas, Alexandros Pechlivanis, Panagiotis Zoumpoulakis, Constantinos Baskakis, Konstantina Dipla, Georgios A Theodoridis
The overall metabolic/energetic stress that occurs during an acute bout of exercise is proposed to be the main driving force for long-term training adaptations. Continuous and high-intensity interval exercise protocols (HIIE) are currently prescribed to acquire the muscular and metabolic benefits of aerobic training. We applied (1)H NMR-based metabonomics to compare the overall metabolic perturbation and activation of individual bioenergetic pathways of three popular aerobic exercises matched for effort/strain...
October 4, 2016: Journal of Proteome Research
Hanneke J R van Duijnhoven, Anita Heeren, Marlijn A M Peters, Janne M Veerbeek, Gert Kwakkel, Alexander C H Geurts, Vivian Weerdesteyn
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the effects of exercise training on balance capacity in people in the chronic phase after stroke. Furthermore, we aimed to identify which training regimen was most effective. METHODS: Electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials evaluating the effects of exercise therapy on balance capacity in the chronic phase after stroke. Studies were included if they were of moderate or high methodological quality (PEDro score ≥4)...
October 2016: Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation
Lars H Tang, Ann-Dorthe Zwisler, Selina K Berg, Patrick Doherty, Rod S Taylor, Henning Langberg
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate if exercise intensity guided by rating of perceived exertion (RPE) results in an equivalent cardiovascular response when applied in either a center-based or a home-based setting. DESIGN: Data from patients with heart disease (post-valve surgery and atrial fibrillation post-radiofrequency ablation) participating in exercise-based rehabilitation were included. Patients performed a 12-week program in either a center- or a home-based setting...
September 14, 2016: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Eric J Shiroma, Nancy R Cook, JoAnn E Manson, M V Moorthy, Julie E Buring, Eric B Rimm, I-Min Lee
PURPOSE: To examine the association of strength training with incident type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk. METHODS: We followed 35 754 healthy women (mean age, 62.6 years, range 47.0 - 97.8) from the Women's Health Study, who responded to a health questionnaire that included physical activity questions in 2000; assessing health outcomes through annual health questionnaire through 2014 (average (SD) follow-up = 10.7 (3.7) years). Incident type 2 diabetes (N cases = 2120) and cardiovascular disease (N cases = 1742) were confirmed on medical record review...
August 30, 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Lee Chia-Lun, Hsu Wei-Chieh, Cheng Ching-Feng
PURPOSE: To determine how high-intensity interval training (HIIT) protocols featuring matched times but distinct sprint durations affect cardiorespiratory and metabolic responses and performance. METHODS: Thirty-eight recreationally active men (aged 21 ± 2 years) were assigned to one of three interval training groups: long-duration high-intensity (HIIT60s; 8 × 60-s at 85%-90% V˙O2max; 120-s recovery at 30% V˙O2max), short-duration high-intensity (HIIT10s; 48 × 10-s at 85%-90% V˙O2max; 20-s recovery at 30% V˙O2max), and control (CON; regular physical activity without HIIT)...
August 30, 2016: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Elena Nebot, Virginia A Aparicio, Irene Coll-Risco, Daniel Camiletti-Moirón, Johannes Schneider, Garyfallia Kapravelou, Patrick Heimel, Rosario Martínez, Ana Andrade, Paul Slezak, Heinz Redl, Jesús M Porres, María López-Jurado, Peter Pietschmann, Pilar Aranda
BACKGROUND: Weight loss is a public health concern in obesity-related diseases such as metabolic syndrome, and the protein level of the diets seem to be crucial for the development and maintenance of bone. The nature of exercise and whether exercise in combination with moderately high-protein dietary interventions could protect against potential bone mass deficits remains unclear. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of a moderately high-protein diet and interval aerobic training combined with strength-endurance exercise (IASE) protocol on bone status, and to assess potential interaction effects (i...
November 2016: Bone
Florent Besnier, Marc Labrunée, Atul Pathak, Anne Pavy-Le Traon, Céline Galès, Jean-Michel Sénard, Thibaut Guiraud
Patients with cardiovascular disease show autonomic dysfunction, including sympathetic activation and vagal withdrawal, which leads to fatal events. This review aims to place sympathovagal balance as an essential element to be considered in management for cardiovascular disease patients who benefit from a cardiac rehabilitation program. Many studies showed that exercise training, as non-pharmacologic treatment, plays an important role in enhancing sympathovagal balance and could normalize levels of markers of sympathetic flow measured by microneurography, heart rate variability or plasma catecholamine levels...
August 16, 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"