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fever review

E Littlejohn, W Marder, E Lewis, S Francis, J Jackish, W J McCune, E C Somers
Background Both C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) can be elevated in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) flare and infection, and are therefore of limited utility for distinguishing between the two conditions in febrile SLE patients. Methods A medical records review of hospitalizations (1997-2006) of SLE patients in the Michigan Lupus Cohort was performed. Eligible hospitalizations were those in which patients presented with a temperature of >100.3°F or with subjective fevers as a presenting complaint at admission...
January 1, 2018: Lupus
Vanesa Alende-Castro, Cristina Macía-Rodríguez, Ignacio Novo-Veleiro, Xana García-Fernández, Mercedes Treviño-Castellano, Sergio Rodríguez-Fernández, Arturo González-Quintela
BACKGROUND: Forms of presentation of Q fever vary widely across Spain, with differences between the north and south. In the absence of reported case series from Galicia (north-west Spain), this study sought to describe a Q-fever case series in this region for the first time, and conduct a systematic review to analyse all available data on the disease in Spain. METHODS: Patients with positive serum antibodies to Coxiella burnetii from a single institution over a 5-year period (January 2011-December 2015) were included...
March 15, 2018: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Marion Griton, Jan Pieter Konsman
Although the immune and nervous systems have long been considered independent biological systems, they turn out to mingle and interact extensively. The present review summarizes recent insights into the neural pathways activated by and involved in infection-induced inflammation and discusses potential clinical applications. The simplest activation concerns a reflex action within C-fibers leading to neurogenic inflammation. Low concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines or bacterial fragments may also act on these afferent nerve fibers to signal the central nervous system and bring about early fever, hyperalgesia and sickness behavior...
March 14, 2018: Clinical Autonomic Research: Official Journal of the Clinical Autonomic Research Society
Yanouk Epelboin, Sarah C Chaney, Amandine Guidez, Nausicaa Habchi-Hanriot, Stanislas Talaga, Lanjiao Wang, Isabelle Dusfour
Since the 1940s, French Guiana has implemented vector control to contain or eliminate malaria, yellow fever, and, recently, dengue, chikungunya, and Zika. Over time, strategies have evolved depending on the location, efficacy of the methods, development of insecticide resistance, and advances in vector control techniques. This review summarises the history of vector control in French Guiana by reporting the records found in the private archives of the Institute Pasteur in French Guiana and those accessible in libraries worldwide...
March 12, 2018: Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
Almut Prkno, Matthias Kaiser, Daniela Goerigk, Martin Pfeffer, Thomas W Vahlenkamp, Donata Hoffmann, Martin Beer, Alexander Starke
Cowpox virus (CPXV) infection is a reportable and potentially zoonotic disease that occurs sporadically in a variety of animals. During the past six decades, CPXV infection has been extensively researched and described in both domestic (cat, dog, horse, cattle) and zoo animals (e. g. elephant, rhinoceros, okapi). Of note, a review of the literature produced only three reports of CPXV in individual or small groups of South American camelids. The goal of this review was to describe the current knowledge as it relates to clinical features of CPXV infection in South American camelids and to compare the clinical manifestations with those described in other animal species...
February 2018: Tierärztliche Praxis. Ausgabe G, Grosstiere/Nutztiere
Maria Grazia Dente, Flavia Riccardo, Gloria Nacca, Alessia Ranghiasci, Camille Escadafal, Lobna Gaayeb, Miguel Angel Jiménez-Clavero, Jean-Claude Manuguerra, Marie Picard, Jovita Fernández-Pinero, Elisa Pérez-Ramírez, Vincent Robert, Kathleen Victoir, Silvia Declich
In the context of One Health, there is presently an effort to integrate surveillance of human, animal, entomological, and environmental sectors. This aims to strengthen the prevention of, and preparedness against, arbovirus infections, also in the light of environmental and climate changes that could increase the risk of transmission. However, criteria to define integrated surveillance, and to compare different systems, still need to be identified and tested. We conducted a scoping review to identify and examine surveillance systems for West Nile virus (WNV), chikungunya virus (CHKV), dengue virus (DENV), and Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), which involve human, animal, entomological, and environmental sectors...
March 10, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Lusiele Guaraldo, Mayumi Duarte Wakimoto, Heloisa Ferreira, Clarisse Bressan, Guilherme Amaral Calvet, Geraldo Castelar Pinheiro, Andre Machado Siqueira, Patrícia Brasil
Chikungunya virus is amongst the fastest expanding vector transmissible diseases in recent years and has been causing massive epidemics in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. Despite human infection by this virus being first described in the 1950s, there is a lack of adequate therapeutic evaluations to guide evidence-based recommendations. The current guidelines rely heavily in specialists' opinion and experience instead of using higher rated evidence. Areas covered: A systematic review of the literature was performed- not restricted to clinical trials - reporting the therapeutic response against this infection with the intent to gather the best evidence of the treatment options against musculoskeletal disorders following chikungunya fever...
March 13, 2018: Expert Review of Anti-infective Therapy
Faris Shweikeh, Stephanie Zyck, Fadi Sweiss, Ajleeta Sangtani, Mohammed Shweikeh, Husam Issa, Michael P Steinmetz, Georges Z Markarian
Study design: In this review, we present a case of Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess (ASEA) and review the literature. Objectives: To provide further insight on a rare condition. Setting: A description of a patient with ASEA in a 58-year-old woman that was successfully treated with conservative management is presented. Methods: Following case presentation, a literature search (MedLine and PubMed) and assessment of epidemiology, presentation, diagnosis, treatments, and outcomes is performed...
2018: Spinal Cord Series and Cases
Prabahs Prasun Giri, Joydeb Roy, Agnisekhar Saha
Aim of the Study: Scrub typhus has been globally recognized as an emerging infectious disease contributing significantly to pyrexia of unknown origin (PUO) and a potential cause of multiorgan dysfunction syndrome (MODS). We studied the incidence of scrub typhus as a cause of pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) admission and MODS in our hospital and its clinical and laboratory characteristics to measure the incidence of MODS caused by scrub typhus. Materials and Methods: This study was done in a pediatric teaching hospital in Kolkata, India...
February 2018: Indian Journal of Critical Care Medicine
Jacklyn R Hurst, Katherine J Kasper, Akshay N Sule, John K McCormick
Streptococcus pyogenes is a human-specific and globally prominent bacterial pathogen that despite causing numerous human infections, this bacterium is normally found in an asymptomatic carrier state. This review provides an overview of both bacterial and human factors that likely play an important role in nasopharyngeal colonization and pharyngitis, as well as the development of acute rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. Here we highlight a recently described role for bacterial superantigens in promoting acute nasopharyngeal infection, and discuss how these immune system activating toxins could be crucial to initiate the autoimmune process in rheumatic heart disease...
March 9, 2018: Infection, Genetics and Evolution
Abhishek De, Murlidhar Rajagopalan, Aarti Sarda, Sudip Das, Projna Biswas
Drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) syndrome, is also known as drug induced hypersensitivity syndrome and by various other names. It is now recognised as one of the severe cutaneous adverse reaction (SCAR) and can be potentially life-threatening. Historically, it was most frequently linked with phenytoin and was initially described as phenytoin hypersensitivity syndrome. However, it was later found to be caused by various other medications. Anticonvulsants and sulfonamides are the most common offender...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Dermatology
Toshihiko Komai, Shuji Sumitomo, Shuzo Teruya, Keishi Fujio
A 76-year-old man complicated with end-stage renal disease had latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), and isoniazid (INH) 300 mg daily was started to prevent reactivation of LTBI before using biologic agents for rheumatoid arthritis. On the 8th day after administration of INH, he presented with a fever, petechiae, and myalgia. Serological studies revealed elevated myogenic enzymes and creatinine level. Based on the exclusion of other etiologies, rapid improvement with cessation of INH, and the recurrence of the fever and myalgia with re-administration of a reduced dose of INH, we diagnosed him with INH-induced rhabdomyolysis...
March 9, 2018: Internal Medicine
Shi-Jun Liu, Zhi-Shu Tang, Zhi-Xin Liao, Chun-Li Cui, Hong-Bo Liu, Yan-Ni Liang, Yu Zhang, Hong-Bo Xu, Dong-Bo Zhang, Ya-Ting Zheng, Huan-Xian Shi, Shi-Ying Li
ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Ligularia przewalskii (Maxim.) Diels (LP) (called zhangyetuowu in Chinese), is generally found in moist forest areas in the western regions of China. The root, leaves and flower of LP are utilized as a common traditional medicine in China. It has been utilized conventionally in herbal remedies for the remedy of haemoptysis, asthma, pulmonary phthisis, jaundice hepatitis, food poisoning, bronchitis, cough, fever, wound healing, measles, carbuncle, swelling and phlegm diseases...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Ethnopharmacology
Berk Hazır, Hakan Bahadır Haberal, Devrim Akıncı, Bülent Akdoğan
INTRODUCTION: A pelvic lymphocele is a collection of lymphatic fluid that develops after extensive lymphadenectomies in surgeries such as urological malignancies or renal transplantation. Pelvic lymphoceles may cause complications such as fever, abdominal pain, leg swelling, genital swelling and flank pain. This report summarizes the management of a pelvic lymphocele after open radical retropubic prostatectomy with bilateral lymphadenectomy. PRESENTATION OF CASE: Herein, we present a case in which a pelvic lymphocele developed seven months post-radical open retropubic prostatectomy and through this patient we discussed the lymphocele following radical prostatectomy...
March 6, 2018: International Journal of Surgery Case Reports
Sareh Shahmohammadi, Mohammad Ali Sahraian, Abootorab Shahmohammadi, Rozita Doosti, Ali Zare-Mirzaie, Abdorreza Naser Moghadasi
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is one of the most important demyelinating diseases that affects the central nervous system. Its treatment often involves a long-term disease modifying therapy. According to some studies, the prevalence of autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and ulcerative colitis (UC) is higher in MS patients than in the normal population. There are also few studies that have reported the onset of UC after rituximab therapy. The present study presents a report of a 31-years old female patient suffering from aggressive multiple sclerosis, which developed into autoimmune hepatitis during the MS therapy...
March 1, 2018: Multiple Sclerosis and related Disorders
Cheryl L Maier, Phillip J Gross, Christina L Dean, Satheesh Chonat, Andrew Ip, Morgan McLemore, Fuad El Rassi, Sean R Stowell, Cassandra D Josephson, Ross M Fasano
BACKGROUND: Fever accompanying vaso-occlusive crisis is a common presentation in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and carries a broad differential diagnosis. Here, we report a case of transfusion-transmitted malaria in a patient with SCD presenting with acute vaso-occlusive crisis and rapidly decompensating to multisystem organ failure (MSOF). CASE REPORT: An 18-year-old African American male with SCD was admitted after multiple days of fever and severe generalized body pain...
March 9, 2018: Transfusion
Xiu-Jing Han, Dan-Hong Su, Jian-Yun Yi, Ya-Wei Zou, Yu-Ling Shi
BACKGROUND: The typical manifestations of Penicillium marneffei (nowadays Talaromyces marneffei) infection in children without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remain unclear. The current work presents the case of a child without an underlying disease who was infected with P. marneffei comorbid with eosinophilia. CASE PRESENTATION: A 2-year-old male was infected with P. marneffei. A physical examination revealed a high-grade fever, ulcerated lesions in the oral mucosa, anemia, pruritic erythematous papules on the sac and thigh and watery diarrhea...
March 9, 2018: Mycopathologia
Michael Gottlieb, Brit Long, Alex Koyfman
BACKGROUND: Pharyngitis is a common disease in the emergency department (ED). Despite a relatively low incidence of complications, there are many dangerous conditions that can mimic this disease and are essential for the emergency physician to consider. OBJECTIVE: This article provides a review of the evaluation and management of group A β-hemolytic Streptococcal (GABHS) pharyngitis, as well as important medical conditions that can mimic this disease. DISCUSSION: GABHS pharyngitis often presents with fever, sore throat, tonsillar exudates, and anterior cervical lymphadenopathy...
March 6, 2018: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Dissanayake Mudiyanselage Priyantha Udaya Kumara Ralapanawa, Kulatunga Wijekoon Mudiyanselage Pramitha Prabhashini Kumarihamy, Miriyalini Sundararajah, Widana Arachchilage Thilak Ananda Jayalath
BACKGROUND: Eosinophilic myocarditis is one of the fatal complications of idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndromes. Given the rarity of this form of myocarditis, it is often under-recognized. We describe a young girl who presented with features of heart failure. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of eosinophilic myocarditis in a young Sri Lankan female. CASE PRESENTATION: A previously healthy 21 year old Sri Lankan female admitted with shortness of breath for 1 week duration with associated low grade fever and profuse sweating...
March 9, 2018: BMC Research Notes
Zoë Pieters, Neil J Saad, Marina Antillón, Virginia E Pitzer, Joke Bilcke
Enteric fever is a febrile illness, occurring mostly in Asia and Africa, which can present as a severe and possibly fatal disease. Currently, a case fatality rate (CFR) of 1% is assumed when evaluating the global burden of enteric fever. Until now, no meta-analysis has been conducted to summarize mortality from enteric fever. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to aggregate all available evidence. We estimated an overall CFR of 2.49% (95% CI: 1.65%-3.75%, n=44), and a CFR in hospitalized patients of 4...
March 7, 2018: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
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