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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28223940/reconsideration-of-serial-visual-reversal-learning-in-octopus-octopus-vulgaris-from-a-methodological-perspective
#1
Alexander Bublitz, Severine R Weinhold, Sophia Strobel, Guido Dehnhardt, Frederike D Hanke
Octopuses (Octopus vulgaris) are generally considered to possess extraordinary cognitive abilities including the ability to successfully perform in a serial reversal learning task. During reversal learning, an animal is presented with a discrimination problem and after reaching a learning criterion, the signs of the stimuli are reversed: the former positive becomes the negative stimulus and vice versa. If an animal improves its performance over reversals, it is ascribed advanced cognitive abilities. Reversal learning has been tested in octopus in a number of studies...
2017: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221674/effects-of-visitor-numbers-on-captive-european-red-squirrels-sciurus-vulgaris-and-impacts-on-visitor-experience
#2
Eleanor E Woolway, Anne E Goodenough
Visitors to zoological collections can have substantial effects on captive animals that vary according to species, enclosure design, visitor proximity, and husbandry methods. One particularly intense form of visitor interaction occurs in immersive exhibits such as walk-through enclosures. Such enclosures are increasingly common but effects on animal behavior are currently understudied. Here, the behavior of captive European red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) is studied in relation to visitor numbers in a walk-through enclosure...
February 21, 2017: Zoo Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28218962/survey-of-neonatal-resuscitation-practices-showed-post-training-improvements-but-need-to-reinforce-preterm-management-monitoring-and-adrenaline-use
#3
Montserrat Izquierdo, Martín Iriondo, César Ruiz, Gonzalo Zeballos, Miguel Sánchez, Eva Gonzalez, Máximo Vento, Marta Thió
AIM: Neonatal resuscitation surveys have showed practice variations between countries, centres and levels of care. We evaluated delivery room practices after a nationwide neonatal resuscitation training programme focused on non-tertiary centres. METHODS: A 2012 survey sent to all Spanish hospitals handling deliveries covered staff availability and training, equipment and practices in the delivery room and during transfers to neonatal intensive care units. The results from 98 centres that had completed a previous survey in 2007 were analysed by levels of care...
February 20, 2017: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28186616/introduction-of-robot-assisted-radical-hysterectomy-for-early-stage-cervical-cancer-impact-on-complications-costs-and-oncologic-outcome
#4
Emelie Wallin, Angelique Flöter Rådestad, Henrik Falconer
INTRODUCTION: The objective was to assess the impact of robot-assisted radical hysterectomy (RRH) on surgical and oncologic outcome and costs compared to open radical hysterectomy (ORH) at a tertiary referral center in Sweden. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this retrospective analysis all patients treated with radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for early stage uterine cervical cancer during 2006 -2015 were included (n=304). The patients were divided into two groups, ORH (n=155) and RRH (n=149)...
February 10, 2017: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28169029/the-contribution-of-volunteer-based-monitoring-data-to-the-assessment-of-harmful-phytoplankton-blooms-in-brazilian-urban-streams
#5
Davi Gasparini Fernandes Cunha, Simone Pereira Casali, Patrícia Bortoletto de Falco, Ian Thornhill, Steven Arthur Loiselle
Urban streams are vulnerable to a range of impacts, leading to the impairment of ecosystem services. However, studies on phytoplankton growth in tropical lotic systems are still limited. Citizen science approaches use trained volunteers to collect environmental data. We combined data on urban streams collected by volunteers with data obtained by professional scientists to identify potential drivers of phytoplankton community and determine thresholds for Cyanobacteria development. We combined datasets (n=117) on water quality and environmental observations in 64 Brazilian urban streams with paired data on phytoplankton...
February 3, 2017: Science of the Total Environment
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28128041/barriers-and-enablers-to-academic-health-leadership
#6
Aleem Bharwani, Theresa Kline, Margaret Patterson, Peter Craighead
Purpose This study sought to identify the barriers and enablers to leadership enactment in academic health-care settings. Design/methodology/approach Semi-structured interviews ( n = 77) with programme stakeholders (medical school trainees, university leaders, clinical leaders, medical scientists and directors external to the medical school) were conducted, and the responses content-analysed. Findings Both contextual and individual factors were identified as playing a role in affecting academic health leadership enactment that has an impact on programme development, success and maintenance...
February 6, 2017: Leadership in Health Services
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28108345/reinstatement-after-human-feature-positive-discrimination-learning
#7
REVIEW
Mathijs Franssen, Nathalie Claes, Bram Vervliet, Tom Beckers, Dirk Hermans, Frank Baeyens
In two experiments, using an online conditioned suppression task, we investigated the possibility of reinstatement of extinguished feature-target compound presentations after sequential feature-positive discrimination training in humans. Furthermore, given a hierarchical account of Pavlovian modulation (e.g., Bonardi, 1998; Bonardi and Jennings, 2009), we predicted A-US reinstatement to be stronger than US-only reinstatement. In Experiment 1, participants learned a sequential feature-positive discrimination (X→A(+)|A(-)), which was subsequently extinguished (X→A(-))...
January 17, 2017: Behavioural Processes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095201/multisensory-bayesian-inference-depends-on-synapse-maturation-during-training-theoretical-analysis-and-neural-modeling-implementation
#8
Mauro Ursino, Cristiano Cuppini, Elisa Magosso
Recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest that in multisensory conditions, the brain performs a near-optimal Bayesian estimate of external events, giving more weight to the more reliable stimuli. However, the neural mechanisms responsible for this behavior, and its progressive maturation in a multisensory environment, are still insufficiently understood. The aim of this letter is to analyze this problem with a neural network model of audiovisual integration, based on probabilistic population coding-the idea that a population of neurons can encode probability functions to perform Bayesian inference...
March 2017: Neural Computation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088553/the-influence-of-landmark-stability-on-control-by-occasion-setters
#9
REVIEW
Lauren M Cleland, Chad M Ruprecht, Ronnie V Lee, Kenneth J Leising
In an operant serial feature-positive procedure, an occasion setter (OSX) signals that a response will be reinforced in the presence of a second stimulus (e.g., a discriminative stimulus, A). During a transfer test, the OS is paired with a different discriminative stimulus. Experiment 1a tested transfer effects in a touchscreen-based spatial occasion setting task with pigeons. During training, four OSs (OSW, OSX, OSY, and OSZ) were paired on separate trials with landmark A (LMA) or B (LMB) and the opportunity for a reinforced response at one location to the immediate left (R1) or right (R2) of the LM (OSW→LMA:R1, OSX→LMA:R2, OSY→LMB:R1, OSZ→LMB:R2)...
January 11, 2017: Behavioural Processes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28075419/surveillance-of-clostridium-difficile-infections-results-from-a-six-year-retrospective-study-in-nine-hospitals-of-a-north-italian-local-health-authority
#10
Greta Roncarati, Laura Dallolio, Erica Leoni, Manuela Panico, Angela Zanni, Patrizia Farruggia
Clostridium difficile is an emerging cause of healthcare associated infections. In nine hospitals of an Italian Local Health Authority the episodes of C. difficile infection (CDI) were identified using the data registered by the centralized Laboratory Information System, from 2010 to 2015. CDI incidence (positive patients for A and/or B toxins per patients-days) was analysed per year, hospital, and ward. A number of cases approximately equivalent to the mean of identified cases per year were studied retrospectively to highlight the risk factors associated to CDI and their severity...
January 10, 2017: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28071806/gps-perspectives-on-prescribing-for-older-people-in-primary-care-a-qualitative-study
#11
David O Riordan, Stephen Byrne, Aoife Fleming, Patricia M Kearney, Rose Galvin, Carol Sinnott
AIMS: The aim of this study was firstly to reveal the determinants of GP prescribing behaviour for older adults in primary care and secondly to elicit GPs' views on the potential role for broad intervention strategies involving pharmacists and/or information technology systems in general practice. METHODS: Semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out with a purposive sample of GPs. Three multidisciplinary researchers independently coded the interview data using a framework approach...
January 10, 2017: British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28069295/short-term-memory-of-caenorhabditis-elegans-against-bacterial-pathogens-involves-creb-transcription-factor
#12
Udayakumar Prithika, Ramaraj Vikneswari, Krishnaswamy Balamurugan
One of the key issues pertaining to the control of memory is to respond to a consistently changing environment or microbial niche present in it. Human cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) transcription factor which plays a crucial role in memory has a homolog in C. elegans, crh-1. crh-1 appears to influence memory processes to certain extent by habituation of the host to a particular environment. The discrimination between the pathogen and a non-pathogen is essential for C. elegans in a microbial niche which determines its survival...
December 30, 2016: Immunobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28062427/novel-sleep-management-method-in-a-toddler-displaying-fear-and-trauma-the-boss-of-my-sleep-book
#13
Sarah Blunden
Sleep problems in toddlers occur in ∼40% of children and increase the likelihood of postnatal depression. Most sleep training in toddlers requires contact with a trained professional, and requires a parent to ignore their child's cries, causing distress to many children and parents, increasing attrition and leaving families untreated and at risk. This case study reports success in significantly ameliorating sleep reluctance and bedtime fears in a sleep disturbed toddler with a history of trauma. It uses a novel use of bedtime behaviour management with some positive reinforcement techniques, called the Boss of My Sleep book: a non-cry, online (thus readily and cheaply available without a trained professional) sleep intervention...
January 6, 2017: BMJ Case Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28040431/overshadowing-depends-on-cue-and-reinforcement-sensitivity-but-not-schizotypy
#14
Clare Pickett, Helen J Cassaday, Peter A Bibby
There is evidence for impaired selective learning mechanisms in individuals high in schizotypy. Overshadowing provides a direct test of selective learning based on cue salience and has previously been reported to be impaired in relation to schizotypy scores. The present study tested for overshadowing using food allergy and Lego construction task variants. Both variants used the same number of conditioned stimulus (CS) cues and the same number of learning trials. CS cues were trained in compound pairs or in isolation and overshadowing was subsequently tested on trials followed by negative versus positive outcomes...
March 15, 2017: Behavioural Brain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28031302/a-review-of-10-years-of-vasectomy-programming-and-research-in-low-resource-settings
#15
REVIEW
Dominick Shattuck, Brian Perry, Catherine Packer, Dawn Chin Quee
Vasectomy is a highly effective and safe contraceptive method for couples who want to stop childbearing, but only 2.4% of men around the world use this method. We conducted an extensive review of the vasectomy research literature and programmatic reports, published between April 2005 and April 2015, to synthesize barriers and facilitators to vasectomy adoption. Of the more than 230 documents initially retrieved in our search, we ultimately included 75 documents in our review and synthesized the findings according to the Supply-Enabling Environment-Demand (SEED) Programming Model...
December 23, 2016: Global Health, Science and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27942577/laboratory-notes-from-behavioral-pharmacologists-and-trainees-considerations-for-the-discipline
#16
Rick A Bevins, Scott T Barrett, Brady M Thompson, Steven T Pittenger
In several laboratory meetings, we discussed the challenges that face trainees in behavioral pharmacology. Major concerns, such as a difficult funding climate and limited academic job prospects were discussed at first. However, we decided to concentrate on ways to meet these challenges; versus focusing on negatives and listing gripes. Within this more constructive framework, we identified the importance of broadening training to aligned areas to enhance the capacity of behavioral pharmacologists to collaborate in multidisciplinary teams...
November 2016: Behav Anal (Wash D C)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27929303/correction-to-campos-melady-et-al-2016
#17
(no author information available yet)
Reports an error in "The Effect of Therapists' Adherence and Competence in Delivering the Adolescent Community Reinforcement Approach on Client Outcomes" by Marita Campos-Melady, Jane Ellen Smith, Robert J. Meyers, Susan H. Godley and Mark D. Godley (Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, Advanced Online Publication, Oct 13, 2016, np). In the original article, the disclosed interest for Mark D. Godley in the author note is misrepresented. The accurate representation is that the organization employing Mark D. Godley, Chestnut Health Systems, receives fees for A-CRA training...
December 8, 2016: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors: Journal of the Society of Psychologists in Addictive Behaviors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914389/discrimination-of-frequency-modulated-sweeps-by-mice
#18
Laurel A Screven, Micheal L Dent
Mice often produce ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) that sweep upwards in frequency from around 60 to around 80 kHz and downwards in frequency from 80 to 60 kHz. Whether or not these USVs are used for communication purposes is still unknown. Here, mice were trained and tested using operant conditioning procedures and positive reinforcement to discriminate between synthetic upsweeps and downsweeps. The stimuli varied in bandwidth, duration, and direction of sweep. The mice performed significantly worse when discriminating between background and test stimuli when the stimuli all occupied the same bandwidths...
September 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911478/modulation-of-whistle-production-related-to-training-sessions-in-bottlenose-dolphins-tursiops-truncatus-under-human-care
#19
Juliana Lopez Marulanda, Olivier Adam, Fabienne Delfour
Bottlenose dolphins are highly social cetaceans with an extensive sound production including clicks, burst-pulsed sounds, and whistles. Some whistles, known as signature whistles, are individually specific. These acoustic signatures are commonly described as being emitted in contexts of stress during forced isolation and as group cohesion calls. Interactions between humans and captive dolphins is largely based on positive reinforcement conditioning within several training/feeding sessions per day. Vocal behavior of dolphins during these interactions might vary...
November 2016: Zoo Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27903490/can-a-free-wearable-activity-tracker-change-behavior-the-impact-of-trackers-on-adults-in-a-physician-led-wellness-group
#20
Lisa Gualtieri, Sandra Rosenbluth, Jeffrey Phillips
BACKGROUND: Wearable activity trackers (trackers) are increasingly popular devices used to track step count and other health indicators. Trackers have the potential to benefit those in need of increased physical activity, such as adults who are older and face significant health challenges. These populations are least likely to purchase trackers and most likely to face challenges in using them, yet may derive educational, motivational, and health benefits from their use once these barriers are removed...
November 30, 2016: JMIR Research Protocols
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