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Direct anticoagulants

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28210989/net-clinical-benefit-of-dabigatran-vs-warfarin-in-venous-thromboembolism-analyses-from-re-cover-%C3%A2-re-cover%C3%A2-ii-and-re-medy%C3%A2
#1
Martin Feuring, Sam Schulman, Henry Eriksson, Ajay J Kakkar, Sebastian Schellong, Stefan Hantel, Elke Schueler, Jörg Kreuzer, Samuel Z Goldhaber
The direct oral anticoagulants, e.g., dabigatran etexilate (DE), are effective and well tolerated treatments for venous thromboembolism (VTE). Net clinical benefit (NCB) is a useful concept in weighing potential benefits against potential harm of comparator drugs. The NCB of DE vs. warfarin in VTE treatment was compared. Post-hoc analyses were performed on pooled data from the 6-month RE-COVER® and RE-COVER™ II trials, and data from the RE-MEDY™ trial (up to 36 months), to compare the NCB of DE (150 mg twice daily) and warfarin [target international normalized ratio (INR) 2...
February 16, 2017: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28209729/edoxaban-for-the-prevention-of-thromboembolism-in-patients-with-atrialfibrillation-and-bioprosthetic-valves
#2
Anthony P Carnicelli, Raffaele De Caterina, Jonathan L Halperin, Giulia Renda, Christian T Ruff, Marco Trevisan, Francesco Nordio, Michele F Mercuri, Elliott Antman, Robert P Giugliano
Atrial fibrillation (AF) and valvular heart disease (VHD) frequently coexist and independently increase mortality1. Bioprosthetic valve implantation (surgical or transcatheter), is a common, increasingly utilized treatment for VHD2. Patients with AF and bioprosthetic valves require anticoagulation to prevent thromboembolic events. Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are safe and efficacious alternatives to vitamin K antagonists for anticoagulation in AF. However, guidelines recommend against NOACs in patients with bioprosthetic valves, citing a lack of supporting data...
February 16, 2017: Circulation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28208203/acute-pulmonary-embolism-after-discharge-duration-of-therapy-and-follow-up-testing
#3
Cecilia Becattini, Laura Franco, Giancarlo Agnelli
Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequent cause of death and serious disability with a risk extending far beyond the acute phase of the disease. Anticoagulant treatment reduces the risk for death and recurrent VTE after a first PE. The optimal duration of anticoagulation after a first episode of PE remains controversial and should be made on an individual basis, balancing the estimated risk for recurrence without anticoagulant treatment against bleeding risk under anticoagulation. Current recommendations on duration of anticoagulation are based on a 3% per year risk of major bleeding expected during long-term warfarin treatment...
February 2017: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28208199/systemic-thrombolytic-therapy-for-acute-pulmonary-embolism-who-is-a-candidate
#4
Stavros V Konstantinides, Stefano Barco
Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a major cause of both acute and long-term morbidity for a large number of patients worldwide, and massive PE is frequently fatal. Right ventricular (RV) dysfunction is a key determinant of prognosis in the acute phase of PE. Patients with clinically overt RV failure, that is, with cardiogenic shock or persistent hypotension at presentation (acute high-risk PE), are clearly in need of immediate reperfusion treatment with systemic thrombolysis or, alternatively, surgical or catheter-directed techniques...
February 2017: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28208197/reversal-of-direct-oral-anticoagulants-current-status-and-future-directions
#5
Jeffrey I Weitz
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are increasingly used for prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. In phase III clinical trials that included more than 100,000 patients, the DOACs were at least as effective as vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) and were associated with less serious bleeding, particularly less intracranial bleeding. Real-world evidence supports these outcomes. Despite this, some physicians and patients are concerned about serious bleeding or emergencies unless specific reversal agents for the DOACs are available...
February 2017: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28208196/the-novel-oral-anticoagulants-for-acute-venous-thromboembolism-is-warfarin-dead
#6
Alexander T Cohen, Serena Granziera, Nicola Veronese, Giacomo Zoppellaro
The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have been compared with parenteral anticoagulants and vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in several robust studies. DOACs have shown similar efficacy in preventing recurrent VTE and significant reductions in critical site (intracranial) bleeding, fatal bleeding, major and nonmajor bleeding. Warfarin and other VKAs are not dead as treatment modalities for VTE. A better way to describe the current situation is to use a boxing expression, "down but not out...
February 2017: Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28201865/prolongation-of-prothrombin-time-in-the-presence-of-rivaroxaban-is-this-the-only-cause
#7
Safoorah Sagheer, Simon McRae
Rivaroxaban is an oral direct Xa inhibitor that can lead to prolongation of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. However, these basic coagulation tests are not specific for the anticoagulant effect of rivaroxaban and other confounding factors should be considered while interpreting the test results. We report a case of a patient on rivaroxaban, where underlying factor VII deficiency led to confusion in the interpretation of prothrombin time results and delayed her surgery.
February 2017: Internal Medicine Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28198201/clinical-implications-of-reversal-agents-for-direct-oral-anticoagulants
#8
Sarah Monagle, John W Eikelboom, Kuan H Ng, Vinai C Bhagirath
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are effective in preventing and treating venous thromboembolism, and preventing stroke in atrial fibrillation. Until recently, there has been no specific reversal agent for DOACs. Now, a specific antidote for the direct thrombin inhibitor, dabigatran has been approved for use, and antidotes for factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) are being developed. We review the evidence for currently used and emerging reversal strategies, and discuss possible clinical implications, including increased prescription of DOACs, use of DOACs in clinical situations previously felt to pose too great a risk of bleeding, and use of reversal agents beyond currently approved indications...
March 2017: Future Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28197755/direct-oral-anticoagulants-for-extended-duration-thromboprophylaxis-in-hospitalized-medically-ill-patients-are-we-there-yet
#9
Majed S Al Yami, Osamah M Alfayez, Sawsan M Kurdi, Razan Alsheikh
Despite a recommended 7-10 days of thromboprophylaxis, medically ill patients remain at increased risk of developing venous thromboembolism (VTE) after hospital discharge. Here, we present a contemporary review on the efficacy and safety of extended-duration thromboprophylaxis with direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) in hospitalized medically ill patients. A search of publication and trial databases of controlled trials conducted from 2010 to 2016 using the key terms apixaban, rivaroxaban, and betrixaban showed three phase III trials that met our search criteria...
February 14, 2017: Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196633/old-and-new-oral-anticoagulants-food-herbal-medicines-and-drug-interactions
#10
REVIEW
Alessandro Di Minno, Beatrice Frigerio, Gaia Spadarella, Alessio Ravani, Daniela Sansaro, Mauro Amato, Joseph P Kitzmiller, Mauro Pepi, Elena Tremoli, Damiano Baldassarre
The most commonly prescribed oral anticoagulants worldwide are the vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) such as warfarin. Factors affecting the pharmacokinetics of VKAs are important because deviations from their narrow therapeutic window can result in bleedings due to over-anticoagulation or thrombosis because of under-anticoagulation. In addition to pharmacodynamic interactions (e.g., augmented bleeding risk for concomitant use of NSAIDs), interactions with drugs, foods, herbs, and over-the-counter medications may affect the risk/benefit ratio of VKAs...
February 5, 2017: Blood Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196509/point-of-care-testing-for-emergency-assessment-of-coagulation-in-patients-treated-with-direct-oral-anticoagulants
#11
Matthias Ebner, Ingvild Birschmann, Andreas Peter, Charlotte Spencer, Florian Härtig, Joachim Kuhn, Gunnar Blumenstock, Christine S Zuern, Ulf Ziemann, Sven Poli
BACKGROUND: Point-of-care testing (POCT) of coagulation has been proven to be of great value in accelerating emergency treatment. Specific POCT for direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) is not available, but the effects of DOAC on established POCT have been described. We aimed to determine the diagnostic accuracy of Hemochron® Signature coagulation POCT to qualitatively rule out relevant concentrations of apixaban, rivaroxaban, and dabigatran in real-life patients. METHODS: We enrolled 68 patients receiving apixaban, rivaroxaban, or dabigatran and obtained blood samples at six pre-specified time points...
February 15, 2017: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196381/direct-oral-anticoagulants-for-thromboprophylaxis-in-patients-with-antiphospholipid-syndrome
#12
Hannah Cohen, Maria Efthymiou, Carolyn Gates, David Isenberg
The current mainstay of the treatment and secondary thromboprophylaxis of thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is anticoagulation with warfarin or other vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). In addition to their well-known limitations, VKAs are often problematic in APS patients because of the variable sensitivity of thromboplastins to lupus anticoagulant. As a result, the international normalized ratio may not accurately reflect the intensity of anticoagulation. Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are established as therapeutic alternatives to VKAs for a wide range of indications, including the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism...
February 14, 2017: Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28193802/direct-oral-anticoagulants-in-patients-with-atrial-fibrillation-and-valvular-heart-disease-other-than-significant-mitral-stenosis-and-mechanical-valves-a-meta-analysis
#13
Konstantinos C Siontis, Xiaoxi Yao, Bernard J Gersh, Peter A Noseworthy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 14, 2017: Circulation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28192448/differential-inhibitory-action-of-apixaban-on-platelet-and-fibrin-components-of-forming-thrombi-studies-with-circulating-blood-and-in-a-platelet-based-model-of-thrombin-generation
#14
Lluis Pujadas-Mestres, Irene Lopez-Vilchez, Eduardo Arellano-Rodrigo, Joan Carles Reverter, Antonio Lopez-Farre, Maribel Diaz-Ricart, Juan Jose Badimon, Gines Escolar
INTRODUCTION: Mechanisms of action of direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) suggest a potential therapeutic use in the prevention of thrombotic complications in arterial territories. However, effects of DOACs on platelet activation and aggregation have not been explored in detail. We have investigated the effects of apixaban on platelet and fibrin components of thrombus formation under static and flow conditions. METHODS: We assessed the effects of apixaban (10, 40 and 160 ng/mL) on: 1) platelet deposition and fibrin formation onto a thrombogenic surface, with blood circulating at arterial shear-rates; 2) viscoelastic properties of forming clots, and 3) thrombin generation in a cell-model of coagulation primed by platelets...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28191610/italian-intersociety-consensus-on-doac-use-in-internal-medicine
#15
Domenico Prisco, Walter Ageno, Cecilia Becattini, Armando D'Angelo, Giovanni Davì, Raimondo De Cristofaro, Francesco Dentali, Giovanni Di Minno, Anna Falanga, Gualberto Gussoni, Luca Masotti, Gualtiero Palareti, Pasquale Pignatelli, Roberto M Santi, Francesca Santilli, Mauro Silingardi, Antonella Tufano, Francesco Violi
The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) are drugs used in clinical practice since 2009 for the prevention of stroke or systemic embolism in non-valvular atrial fibrillation, and for the treatment and secondary prevention of venous thromboembolism. The four DOACs, including the three factor Xa inhibitors (rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban) and one direct thrombin inhibitor (dabigatran) provide oral anticoagulation therapy alternatives to Vitamin K antagonists (VKAs). Despite their clear advantages, the DOACs require on the part of the internist a thorough knowledge of their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics to ensure their correct use, laboratory monitoring and the appropriate management of adverse events...
February 13, 2017: Internal and Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28188404/-direct-oral-anticoagulants-and-acute-stroke-insights-into-translational-research-studies
#16
C Foerch, J H Schäfer, W Pfeilschifter, F Bohmann
In recent years a considerable number of translational research studies on intracerebral hemorrhage and ischemic stroke have been published, which are characterized by a particular proximity to practical clinical questions. Animal research has provided insights into the pathophysiological processes and therapy effects, which have so far only been insufficiently investigated in clinical studies. This includes the effectiveness of a rapid reversal of anticoagulation in cases of anticoagulation-associated intracerebral hemorrhage and the safety of thrombolytic treatment in ischemic stroke occurring during treatment with anticoagulants...
February 10, 2017: Der Nervenarzt
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28188311/atrial-fibrillation-effective-strategies-using-the-latest-tools
#17
REVIEW
Philip Dooley, Jeffrey Doolittle, Kayla Knauss, Ashley Crowl
Direct oral anticoagulants or warfarin? Rate or rhythm control? Here's how to determine which strategies to pursue and when.
January 2017: Journal of Family Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28185082/dabigatran-etexilate-a-review-in-nonvalvular-atrial-fibrillation
#18
Hannah A Blair, Gillian M Keating
Dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa(®)) is approved in the EU for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation (NVAF) and one or more risk factors. Dabigatran etexilate is a prodrug of dabigatran, a direct inhibitor of thrombin. In patients with NVAF in the phase III RE-LY trial, dabigatran etexilate dosages of 110 and 150 mg twice daily were noninferior to warfarin with regard to the risk of stroke or systemic embolism (primary efficacy endpoint). The higher dosage was associated with a significantly lower risk of stroke or systemic embolism than warfarin, with no significant between-group difference in the risk of major bleeding (primary safety endpoint)...
February 9, 2017: Drugs
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28183598/immobilization-of-heparin-poly-l-lysine-microspheres-on-medical-grade-high-nitrogen-nickel-free-austenitic-stainless-steel-surface-to-improve-the-biocompatibility-and-suppress-thrombosis
#19
Menghua Li, Haide Wu, Yi Wang, Tieying Yin, Hans Gregersen, Xiaojuan Zhang, Xiaoling Liao, Guixue Wang
Thrombosis formation, restenosis, and delayed endothelium regeneration continue to be a challenge for coronary artery stent therapy. To improve the hemocompatibility of cardiovascular implants and to selectively direct vascular cell behavior, a novel heparin/poly-l-lysine microsphere was developed and immobilized on a dopamine-coated surface. We chose medical grade high nitrogen nickel-free austenitic stainless steel as the stent material since it has better biocompatibility. The stability and structural characteristics of the microspheres changed with the heparin: poly-l-lysine concentration ratio...
April 1, 2017: Materials Science & Engineering. C, Materials for Biological Applications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28182323/ibrutinib-associated-bleeding-pathogenesis-management-and-risk-reduction-strategies
#20
REVIEW
Joseph J Shatzel, Sven R Olson, Derrick L Tao, Owen J T McCarty, Alexey V Danilov, Thomas G DeLoughery
Ibrutinib is an irreversible inhibitor of Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) that has proven to be an effective therapeutic agent for multiple B-cell mediated lymphoproliferative disorders. Ibrutinib, however, carries an increased bleeding risk compared to standard chemotherapy. Bleeding events range from minor mucocutaneous bleeding to life-threatening hemorrhage, due in large part to the effects of ibrutinib on several distinct platelet signaling pathways. There is currently minimal data to guide clinicians regarding the use of ibrutinib in patients at high risk for bleeding or on anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy...
February 9, 2017: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis: JTH
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