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ultrasound and cardiac arrest

Benjamin Marchandot, François Levy, Nicola Santelmo, Paul-Michel Mertes, Olivier Morel
BACKGROUND: Adequate strategies using either transthoracic (TTE) or transesophageal (TEE) echocardiography in patients receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an ongoing area of research. OBJECTIVES: As transthoracic point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) during cardiac arrest resuscitation might result in an increased duration of interruptions in the delivery of chest compressions; the use of TEE has been proposed as an alternative. METHODS: No technical complications of either TTE nor TEE are so far being reported in the literature...
March 2, 2018: Heart & Lung: the Journal of Critical Care
Rein Ketelaars, Christian Beekers, Geert-Jan Van Geffen, Gert Jan Scheffer, Nico Hoogerwerf
BACKGROUND: Patients in cardiac arrest must receive algorithm-based management such as basic life support and advanced (cardiac) life support. International guidelines dictate diagnosing and treating any factor that may have caused the arrest or may be complicating the resuscitation. Ultrasound may be of potential value in this process and can be used in a prehospital setting. The objective is to evaluate the use of prehospital ultrasound during traumatic and non-traumatic CPR and determine its impact on prehospital treatment decisions in a Dutch helicopter emergency medical service (HEMS)...
February 22, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Vishesh Kumar, Shahbaz A Malik, Maryam Sheikh, Adam Stys
Infections are known complications of cardiovascular implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). We describe a case of a 62-year-old male who presented with pulseless electrical activity (PEA) cardiac arrest and respiratory failure. He had a history of cardiac resynchronization device and defibrillator (CRT-D) implantation for nonischemic cardiomyopathy. After resuscitation, he was found to have methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteremia on blood culture and large vegetations on the CRT-D lead and tricuspid valve found on echocardiography...
January 2018: South Dakota Medicine: the Journal of the South Dakota State Medical Association
Cynthia Wong
A 47-year-old woman presented to her GP (general practitioner) surgery with a left leg pain of 4 days duration after a recent 4-hour flight. She was taking the oral combined contraceptive pill and had no past medical history. She had a low predictive Wells score for deep vein thrombosis, but her D-dimer was positive, so she had a proximal lower limb vein ultrasound scan as per the National Institute for Clinical Excellence guidelines, which was negative. Two days later, she presented to the emergency department with a collapse and dyspnea...
January 2018: Journal of Investigative Medicine High Impact Case Reports
Fangfang Zhu, Xianfei Ji, Xia Zhong, Haoran Hu, Lining Liang, Jibin Chen, Deya Shang
OBJECTIVE: To observe the effect of mild hypothermia on myocardial β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) signal pathway after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in pigs with cardiac arrest (CA) and explore the mechanism of myocardial protection. METHODS: Healthy male Landraces were collected for reproducing the CA-CPR model (after 8-minute untreated ventricular fibrillation, CPR was implemented). The animals were divided into two groups according to random number table (n = 8)...
February 2018: Zhonghua Wei Zhong Bing Ji Jiu Yi Xue
Chunshuang Wu, Zhongjun Zheng, Libing Jiang, Yuzhi Gao, Jiefeng Xu, Xiaohong Jin, Qijiang Chen, Mao Zhang
BACKGROUND: The prognosis of pulseless electrical activity is dismal. However, it is still challengable to decide when to terminate or continue resuscitation efforts. The aim of this study was to determine whether the use of bedside ultrasound (US) could predict the restoration of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) in patients with pulseless electrical activity (PEA) through the identification of cardiac activity. METHODS: This was a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies that used US to predict ROSC...
2018: PloS One
Antoine Legendre, Diala Khraiche, Phalla Ou, François-Xavier Mauvais, Marine Madrange, Anne-Sophie Guemann, Jean-Philippe Jais, Damien Bonnet, Yamina Hamel, Pascale de Lonlay
INTRODUCTION: Lipin-1 deficiency is a major cause of rhabdomyolysis that are precipitated by febrile illness. The prognosis is poor, with one-third of patients dying from cardiac arrest during a crisis episode. Apart from acute rhabdomyolysis, most patients are healthy, showing normal clinical and cardiac ultrasound parameters. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We report cardiac and exercise examinations of 8 children carrying two LPIN1 mutations. The examinations were performed outside of a myolysis episode, but one patient presented with fever during one examination...
January 5, 2018: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism
Katherine M Berg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 6, 2018: Resuscitation
Rasmus Aagaard, Bo Løfgren, Thorbjørn Grøfte, Erik Sloth, Roni R Nielsen, Christian A Frederiksen, Asger Granfeldt, Morten T Bøtker
INTRODUCTION: Focused cardiac ultrasound can potentially identify reversible causes of cardiac arrest during advanced life support (ALS), but data on the timing of image acquisition are lacking. This study aimed to compare the quality of images obtained during rhythm analysis, bag-mask ventilations, and chest compressions. METHODS: Adult patients in cardiac arrest were prospectively included during 23 months at a Danish community hospital. Physicians who had completed basic ultrasound training performed subcostal focused cardiac ultrasound during rhythm analysis, bag-mask ventilations, and chest compressions...
December 12, 2017: Resuscitation
Olivier Andremont, Damien du Cheyron, Nicolas Terzi, Cedric Daubin, Amélie Seguin, Xavier Valette, Flore-Anne Lecoq, Jean-Jacques Parienti, Bertrand Sauneuf
BACKGROUND: Targeted temperature management (TTM) contributes to improved neurological outcome in adults who have been successfully resuscitated after cardiac arrest with shockable rhythm. Endovascular cooling catheters are widely used to induce and maintain targeted temperature in the ICU. The aim of the study was to compare the risk of complications with cooling catheters and standard central venous catheters. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this prospective single-centre cohort study, we included all patients admitted to an intensive care unit for successfully resuscitated cardiac arrest that required endovascular TTM (Coolgard®, Zoll™ Medical corporation, MA, USA), between August 2012 and November 2014, inclusive...
December 11, 2017: Resuscitation
D J Canty, J Heiberg, Y Yang, A G Royse, S Margale, N Nanjappa, D Scott, A Maier, D I Sessler, A Chuan, A Palmer, A Bucknill, C French, C F Royse
Hip fracture surgery is common, usually occurs in elderly patients who have multiple comorbidities, and is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Pre-operative focused cardiac ultrasound can alter diagnosis and management, but its impact on outcome remains uncertain. This pilot study assessed feasibility and group separation for a proposed large randomised clinical trial of the impact of pre-operative focused cardiac ultrasound on patient outcome after hip fracture surgery. Adult patients requiring hip fracture surgery in four teaching hospitals in Australia were randomly allocated to receive focused cardiac ultrasound before surgery or not...
December 11, 2017: Anaesthesia
Peter Juhl-Olsen, Rasmus Aagaard, Anni Nørgaard Jeppesen
Point-of-care ultrasound may elucidate reversible causes of cardiac arrest, and its use is supported by international guidelines in the periarrest setting. We present a case in which the treatment of cardiac arrest caused tension pneumothoraces and cardiac tamponade by pneumopericardium. Both pneumothorax and tamponade were expected to be identified with ultrasound, but were not. Subcutaneous emphysema precluded the diagnosis of pneumothorax. Cardiac imaging was false negative for tamponade, because the latter was caused by air and not fluid...
November 27, 2017: A & A Case Reports
Máté Rudas, Sam Orde, Marek Nalos
OBJECTIVE: To describe the technique and review the utility of bedside lung ultrasound in acute care. SUMMARY: Lung ultrasound is a useful point-of-care investigation in acute care, especially in patients with dyspnoea or haemodynamic instability. Although normal lung parenchyma is not accessible to ultrasound, distinctive artefacts arising from parietal and visceral pleura indirectly imply the presence of normal lung. As aeration of lung tissue reduces with disease process, visual assessment of several pathologic entities by ultrasound becomes possible...
December 2017: Critical Care and Resuscitation: Journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
Sebastian Voicu, Patrick Henry, Isabelle Malissin, Dillinger Jean-Guillaume, Anastasios Koumoulidis, Nikos Magkoutis, Demetris Yannopoulos, Damien Logeart, Stéphane Manzo-Silberman, Nicolas Péron, Nicolas Deye, Bruno Megarbane, Georgios Sideris
BACKGROUND: Cardiac arrest (CA) without return of spontaneous circulation can be treated with veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (vaECMO) implemented surgically or percutaneously. We performed a study assessing time for vaECMO percutaneous cannulation in the catheterization laboratory. METHODS: Single-centre retrospective study in a University hospital without on-site cardiovascular surgery, including patients aged >18 receiving vaECMO for out- or in-hospital refractory CA of presumed cardiac cause between 2010 and 2016, cannulated by interventional cardiologists...
January 2018: Resuscitation
Eben J Clattenburg, Peter Wroe, Stephen Brown, Kevin Gardner, Lia Losonczy, Amandeep Singh, Arun Nagdev
OBJECTIVE: We aim to evaluate if point-of-care ultrasound use in cardiac arrest is associated with CPR pause duration. METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study of patients with cardiac arrest (CA) presenting to an urban emergency department from July 2016 to January 2017. We collected video recordings of patients with CA in designated code rooms with video recording equipment. The CAs recordings were reviewed and coded by two abstractors. The primary outcome was the difference CPR pause duration when POCUS was and was not performed...
January 2018: Resuscitation
Hyun Suk Chai, Suk Woo Lee, Jung Soo Park, Sang Chul Kim, Ji Han Lee, Hoon Kim
Blunt chest trauma can cause not only damage to the thoracic cage, but can also injure intracardiac structures including the papillary muscles, chordae tendineae, and valve leaflets. Aortic valve (AV) injury secondary to blunt chest trauma is a rare occurrence. Clinically, AV injury may be missed during the initial post-trauma assessment due to the lack of suspicion of cardiac involvement. Thus, the diagnosis of AV injury is often delayed or missed for a time interval of days to months. As a consequence, the traumatic AV regurgitation can rapidly or progressively lead to congestive heart failure unless surgically corrected...
February 2018: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Pawel Rostoff, Bohdan Nessler, Patrycja Pikul, Karolina Golinska-Grzybala, Tomasz Miszalski-Jamka, Jadwiga Nessler
Adrenergic myocarditis is an uncommon presentation of pheochromocytoma and extremely rare cause of de novo acute heart failure (AHF). We present a case of a 31-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of hypertension and recurrent occipital headaches who was admitted to the emergency department due to severe de novo AHF presenting as pulmonary edema and cardiogenic shock. During the hospital admission the patient experienced asystolic cardiac arrest and was successfully resuscitated, intubated, and mechanically ventilated...
November 10, 2017: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Megan Brenner, Christopher Hicks
A standardized approach should be used with a patient with abdominal trauma, including primary and secondary surveys, followed by additional diagnostic testing as indicated. Specific factors can make the diagnosis of serious abdominal trauma challenging, particularly in the face of multiple and severe injuries, unknown mechanism of injury, altered mental status, and impending or complete cardiac arrest. Advances in technology in diagnosis and/or treatment with ultrasound, helical computed tomography, and resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) have significantly advanced trauma care, and are still the focus of current and ongoing investigations...
February 2018: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Tomislav Jelic, Melanie Baimel, Jordan Chenkin
BACKGROUND: Pulmonary embolism can be difficult to diagnose, particularly in those who are hemodynamically unstable and cannot be imaged to confirm the diagnosis. Echocardiography can allow for rapid assessment of patients in shock, but requires adequate transthoracic windows to obtain clinically useful information. Emergency physician-performed transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) may be a useful tool when transthoracic echocardiography fails. CASE REPORT: An 86-year-old woman presented to the emergency department after a fall at home...
November 2017: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Ingegerd Östman-Smith, Gunnar Sjöberg, Annika Rydberg, Per Larsson, Eva Fernlund
Objective: To establish which risk factors are predictive for sudden death in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) diagnosed in childhood. Methods: A Swedish national cohort of patients with HCM diagnosed <19 years of age was collected between 1972 and 2014, consisting of 155 patients with available ECGs, with average follow-up of 10.9±(SD 9.0) years, out of whom 32 had suffered sudden death or cardiac arrest (SD/CA group). Previously proposed risk factors and clinical features, ECG and ultrasound measures were compared between SD/CA group and patients surviving >2 years (n=100), and features significantly more common in SD/CA group were further analysed with univariate and multivariate Cox hazard regression in the total cohort...
2017: Open Heart
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