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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542710/behavioral-inferences-from-the-high-levels-of-dental-chipping-in-homo-naledi
#1
Ian Towle, Joel D Irish, Isabelle De Groote
OBJECTIVES: A variety of mechanical processes can result in antemortem dental chipping. In this study, chipping data in the teeth of Homo naledi are compared with those of other pertinent dental samples to give insight into their etiology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Permanent teeth with complete crowns evidencing occlusal wear were examined macroscopically. The location, number, and severity of fractures were recorded and compared to those found in samples of two other South African fossil hominin species and in samples of nonhuman primates (n = 3) and recent humans (n = 7)...
May 24, 2017: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542642/early-upper-paleolithic-colonization-across-europe-time-and-mode-of-the-gravettian-diffusion
#2
Nuno Bicho, João Cascalheira, Célia Gonçalves
This study presents new models on the origin, speed and mode of the wave-of-advance leading to the definitive occupation of Europe's outskirts by Anatomically Modern Humans, during the Gravettian, between c. 37 and 30 ka ago. These models provide the estimation for possible demic dispersal routes for AMH at a stable spread rate of c. 0.7 km/year, with the likely origin in Central Europe at the site of Geissenklosterle in Germany and reaching all areas of the European landscape. The results imply that: 1. The arrival of the Gravettian populations into the far eastern European plains and to southern Iberia found regions with very low human occupation or even devoid of hominins; 2...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533391/thoracic-vertebral-count-and-thoracolumbar-transition-in-australopithecus-afarensis
#3
Carol V Ward, Thierra K Nalley, Fred Spoor, Paul Tafforeau, Zeresenay Alemseged
The evolution of the human pattern of axial segmentation has been the focus of considerable discussion in paleoanthropology. Although several complete lumbar vertebral columns are known for early hominins, to date, no complete cervical or thoracic series has been recovered. Several partial skeletons have revealed that the thoracolumbar transition in early hominins differed from that of most extant apes and humans. Australopithecus africanus, Australopithecus sediba, and Homo erectus all had zygapophyseal facets that shift from thoracic-like to lumbar-like at the penultimate rib-bearing level, rather than the ultimate rib-bearing level, as in most humans and extant African apes...
May 22, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28531204/messinian-age-and-savannah-environment-of-the-possible-hominin-graecopithecus-from-europe
#4
Madelaine Böhme, Nikolai Spassov, Martin Ebner, Denis Geraads, Latinka Hristova, Uwe Kirscher, Sabine Kötter, Ulf Linnemann, Jérôme Prieto, Socrates Roussiakis, George Theodorou, Gregor Uhlig, Michael Winklhofer
Dating fossil hominids and reconstructing their environments is critically important for understanding human evolution. Here we date the potentially oldest hominin, Graecopithecus freybergi from Europe and constrain the environmental conditions under which it thrived. For the Graecopithecus-bearing Pikermi Formation of Attica/Greece, a saline aeolian dust deposit of North African (Sahara) provenance, we obtain an age of 7.37-7.11 Ma, which is coeval with a dramatic cooling in the Mediterranean region at the Tortonian-Messinian transition...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28531170/potential-hominin-affinities-of-graecopithecus-from-the-late-miocene-of-europe
#5
Jochen Fuss, Nikolai Spassov, David R Begun, Madelaine Böhme
The split of our own clade from the Panini is undocumented in the fossil record. To fill this gap we investigated the dentognathic morphology of Graecopithecus freybergi from Pyrgos Vassilissis (Greece) and cf. Graecopithecus sp. from Azmaka (Bulgaria), using new μCT and 3D reconstructions of the two known specimens. Pyrgos Vassilissis and Azmaka are currently dated to the early Messinian at 7.175 Ma and 7.24 Ma. Mainly based on its external preservation and the previously vague dating, Graecopithecus is often referred to as nomen dubium...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526292/australopithecus-sediba-and-the-emergence-of-homo-questionable-evidence-from-the-cranium-of-the-juvenile-holotype-mh-1
#6
William H Kimbel, Yoel Rak
Malapa Hominin (MH) 1, an immature individual whose second permanent molars had recently reached occlusion at the time of death, is the holotype of Australopithecus sediba, a 2-myr-old South African taxon that has been hypothesized to link phylogenetically australopith-grade hominins to the Homo clade. Given the existence of 2.8 myr-old fossils of Homo in eastern Africa, this hypothesis implies a ghost lineage spanning at least 800 kyr. An alternative hypothesis posits a unique relationship between A. sediba and Australopithecus africanus, which predates the Malapa hominins in southern Africa and whose phylogenetic relationships remain ambiguous...
June 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28526290/hominoid-arcade-shape-pattern-and-magnitude-of-covariation
#7
Stefanie Stelzer, Philipp Gunz, Simon Neubauer, Fred Spoor
The shape of the dental arcade and canine size distinguish extant humans from all apes. Humans are characterized by a parabolic arcade with short postcanine tooth rows and small canines, whereas apes have long, U-shaped arcades with large canines. The evolutionary and biomechanical mechanisms underlying arcade shape differences between and within groups are not well understood. It is unclear, for example, whether evolutionary changes in the covariation among modules comprising the upper and lower jaws are the cause and/or consequence of different arcade shapes...
June 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28511559/migrating-microbes-what-pathogens-can-tell-us-about-population-movements-and-human-evolution
#8
Charlotte J Houldcroft, Jean-Baptiste Ramond, Riaan F Rifkin, Simon J Underdown
BACKGROUND: The biology of human migration can be observed from the co-evolutionary relationship with infectious diseases. While many pathogens are brief, unpleasant visitors to human bodies, others have the ability to become life-long human passengers. The story of a pathogen's genetic code may, therefore, provide insight into the history of its human host. The evolution and distribution of disease in Africa is of particular interest, because of the deep history of human evolution in Africa, the presence of a variety of non-human primates, and tropical reservoirs of emerging infectious diseases...
May 16, 2017: Annals of Human Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28499698/dental-microwear-and-pliocene-paleocommunity-ecology-of-bovids-primates-rodents-and-suids-at-kanapoi
#9
Peter S Ungar, Elicia F Abella, Jenny H E Burgman, Ignacio A Lazagabaster, Jessica R Scott, Lucas K Delezene, Fredrick K Manthi, J Michael Plavcan, Carol V Ward
Reconstructions of habitat at sites like Kanapoi are key to understanding the environmental circumstances in which hominins evolved during the early Pliocene. While Australopithecus anamensis shows evidence of terrestrial bipedality traditionally associated with a more open setting, its enamel has low δ(13)C values consistent with consumption of C3 foods, which predominate in wooded areas of tropical Africa. Habitat proxies, ranging from paleosols and their carbonates to associated herbivore fauna and their carbon isotope ratios, suggest a heterogeneous setting with both grass and woody plant components, though the proportions of each have been difficult to pin down...
May 9, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28489015/tracking-the-evolution-of-causal-cognition-in-humans
#10
Marlize Lombard, Peter Gärdenfors
We suggest a seven-grade model for the evolution of causal cognition as a framework that can be used to gauge variation in the complexity of causal reasoning from the panin-hominin split until the appearance of cognitively modern hunter-gatherer communities. The intention is to put forward a cohesive model for the evolution of causal cognition in humans, which can be assessed against increasingly fine-grained empirical data from the palaeoanthropological and archaeological records. We propose that the tracking behaviour (i...
May 8, 2017: Journal of Anthropological Sciences, Rivista di Antropologia: JASS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28483041/homo-naledi-and-pleistocene-hominin-evolution-in-subequatorial-africa
#11
Lee R Berger, John Hawks, Paul Hgm Dirks, Marina Elliott, Eric M Roberts
New discoveries and dating of fossil remains from the Rising Star cave system, Cradle of Humankind, South Africa, have strong implications for our understanding of Pleistocene human evolution in Africa. Direct dating of Homo naledi fossils from the Dinaledi Chamber (Berger et al., 2015) shows that they were deposited between about 236 ka and 335 ka (Dirks et al., 2017), placing H. naledi in the later Middle Pleistocene. Hawks and colleagues (Hawks et al., 2017) report the discovery of a second chamber within the Rising Star system (Dirks et al...
May 9, 2017: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28483040/the-age-of-homo-naledi-and-associated-sediments-in-the-rising-star-cave-south%C3%A2-africa
#12
Paul Hgm Dirks, Eric M Roberts, Hannah Hilbert-Wolf, Jan D Kramers, John Hawks, Anthony Dosseto, Mathieu Duval, Marina Elliott, Mary Evans, Rainer Grün, John Hellstrom, Andy Ir Herries, Renaud Joannes-Boyau, Tebogo V Makhubela, Christa J Placzek, Jessie Robbins, Carl Spandler, Jelle Wiersma, Jon Woodhead, Lee R Berger
New ages for flowstone, sediments and fossil bones from the Dinaledi Chamber are presented. We combined optically stimulated luminescence dating of sediments with U-Th and palaeomagnetic analyses of flowstones to establish that all sediments containing Homo naledi fossils can be allocated to a single stratigraphic entity (sub-unit 3b), interpreted to be deposited between 236 ka and 414 ka. This result has been confirmed independently by dating three H. naledi teeth with combined U-series and electron spin resonance (US-ESR) dating...
May 9, 2017: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28483039/new-fossil-remains-of-homo-naledi-from-the-lesedi-chamber-south-africa
#13
John Hawks, Marina Elliott, Peter Schmid, Steven E Churchill, Darryl J de Ruiter, Eric M Roberts, Hannah Hilbert-Wolf, Heather M Garvin, Scott A Williams, Lucas K Delezene, Elen M Feuerriegel, Patrick Randolph-Quinney, Tracy L Kivell, Myra F Laird, Gaokgatlhe Tawane, Jeremy M DeSilva, Shara E Bailey, Juliet K Brophy, Marc R Meyer, Matthew M Skinner, Matthew W Tocheri, Caroline VanSickle, Christopher S Walker, Timothy L Campbell, Brian Kuhn, Ashley Kruger, Steven Tucker, Alia Gurtov, Nompumelelo Hlophe, Rick Hunter, Hannah Morris, Becca Peixotto, Maropeng Ramalepa, Dirk van Rooyen, Mathabela Tsikoane, Pedro Boshoff, Paul Hgm Dirks, Lee R Berger
The Rising Star cave system has produced abundant fossil hominin remains within the Dinaledi Chamber, representing a minimum of 15 individuals attributed to Homo naledi. Further exploration led to the discovery of hominin material, now comprising 131 hominin specimens, within a second chamber, the Lesedi Chamber. The Lesedi Chamber is far separated from the Dinaledi Chamber within the Rising Star cave system, and represents a second depositional context for hominin remains. In each of three collection areas within the Lesedi Chamber, diagnostic skeletal material allows a clear attribution to H...
May 9, 2017: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28478935/interpretation-of-footprints-from-site-s-confirms-human-like-bipedal-biomechanics-in-laetoli-hominins
#14
David A Raichlen, Adam D Gordon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 4, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28476281/evaluating-morphometric-body-mass-prediction-equations-with-a-juvenile-human-test-sample-accuracy-and-applicability-to-small-bodied-hominins
#15
Christopher S Walker, Gabriel S Yapuncich, Shilpa Sridhar, Noël Cameron, Steven E Churchill
Body mass is an ecologically and biomechanically important variable in the study of hominin biology. Regression equations derived from recent human samples allow for the reasonable prediction of body mass of later, more human-like, and generally larger hominins from hip joint dimensions, but potential differences in hip biomechanics across hominin taxa render their use questionable with some earlier taxa (i.e., Australopithecus spp.). Morphometric prediction equations using stature and bi-iliac breadth avoid this problem, but their applicability to early hominins, some of which differ in both size and proportions from modern adult humans, has not been demonstrated...
May 2, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28468920/greater-than-the-sum-of-its-parts-modelling-population-contact-and-interaction-of-cultural-repertoires
#16
Nicole Creanza, Oren Kolodny, Marcus W Feldman
Evidence for interactions between populations plays a prominent role in the reconstruction of historical and prehistoric human dynamics; these interactions are usually interpreted to reflect cultural practices or demographic processes. The sharp increase in long-distance transportation of lithic material between the Middle and Upper Palaeolithic, for example, is seen as a manifestation of the cultural revolution that defined the transition between these epochs. Here, we propose that population interaction is not only a reflection of cultural change but also a potential driver of it...
May 2017: Journal of the Royal Society, Interface
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28467888/auditory-object-perception-a-neurobiological-model-and-prospective-review
#17
Julie A Brefczynski-Lewis, James W Lewis
Interaction with the world is a multisensory experience, but most of what is known about the neural correlates of perception comes from studying vision. Auditory inputs enter cortex with its own set of unique qualities, and leads to use in oral communication, speech, music, and the understanding of emotional and intentional states of others, all of which are central to the human experience. To better understand how the auditory system develops, recovers after injury, and how it may have transitioned in its functions over the course of hominin evolution, advances are needed in models of how the human brain is organized to process real-world natural sounds and "auditory objects"...
April 30, 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464269/the-postcranial-skeletal-maturation-of-australopithecus-sediba
#18
Noel Cameron, Barry Bogin, Debra Bolter, Lee R Berger
OBJECTIVES: In 2008, an immature hominin defined as the holotype of the new species Australopithecus sediba was discovered at the 1.9 million year old Malapa site in South Africa. The specimen (MH1) includes substantial post-cranial skeletal material, and provides a unique opportunity to assess its skeletal maturation. METHODS: Skeletal maturity indicators observed on the proximal and distal humerus, proximal ulna, distal radius, third metacarpal, ilium and ischium, proximal femur and calcaneus were used to assess the maturity of each bone in comparison to references for modern humans and for wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)...
May 2, 2017: American Journal of Physical Anthropology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28450384/neandertal-and-denisovan-dna-from-pleistocene-sediments
#19
Viviane Slon, Charlotte Hopfe, Clemens L Weiß, Fabrizio Mafessoni, Marco de la Rasilla, Carles Lalueza-Fox, Antonio Rosas, Marie Soressi, Monika V Knul, Rebecca Miller, John R Stewart, Anatoly P Derevianko, Zenobia Jacobs, Bo Li, Richard G Roberts, Michael V Shunkov, Henry de Lumley, Christian Perrenoud, Ivan Gušić, Željko Kućan, Pavao Rudan, Ayinuer Aximu-Petri, Elena Essel, Sarah Nagel, Birgit Nickel, Anna Schmidt, Kay Prüfer, Janet Kelso, Hernán A Burbano, Svante Pääbo, Matthias Meyer
Although a rich record of Pleistocene human-associated archaeological assemblages exists, the scarcity of hominin fossils often impedes the understanding of which hominins occupied a site. Using targeted enrichment of mitochondrial DNA, we show that cave sediments represent a rich source of ancient mammalian DNA that often includes traces of hominin DNA, even at sites and in layers where no hominin remains have been discovered. By automation-assisted screening of numerous sediment samples, we detected Neandertal DNA in eight archaeological layers from four caves in Eurasia...
May 12, 2017: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28442732/human-bipedal-instability-in-tree-canopy-environments-is-reduced-by-light-touch-fingertip-support
#20
L Johannsen, S R L Coward, G R Martin, A M Wing, A van Casteren, W I Sellers, A R Ennos, R H Crompton, S K S Thorpe
Whether tree canopy habitats played a sustained role in the ecology of ancestral bipedal hominins is unresolved. Some argue that arboreal bipedalism was prohibitively risky for hominins whose increasingly modern anatomy prevented them from gripping branches with their feet. Balancing on two legs is indeed challenging for humans under optimal conditions let alone in forest canopy, which is physically and visually highly dynamic. Here we quantify the impact of forest canopy characteristics on postural stability in humans...
April 25, 2017: Scientific Reports
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