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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28438318/the-affinities-of-homo-floresiensis-based-on-phylogenetic-analyses-of%C3%A2-cranial-dental-and-postcranial-characters
#1
Debbie Argue, Colin P Groves, Michael S Y Lee, William L Jungers
Although the diminutive Homo floresiensis has been known for a decade, its phylogenetic status remains highly contentious. A broad range of potential explanations for the evolution of this species has been explored. One view is that H. floresiensis is derived from Asian Homo erectus that arrived on Flores and subsequently evolved a smaller body size, perhaps to survive the constrained resources they faced in a new island environment. Fossil remains of H. erectus, well known from Java, have not yet been discovered on Flores...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434542/the-neandertal-vertebral-column-2-the-lumbar-spine
#2
Asier Gómez-Olivencia, Mikel Arlegi, Alon Barash, Jay T Stock, Ella Been
Here we provide the most extensive metric and morphological analysis performed to date on the Neandertal lumbar spine. Neandertal lumbar vertebrae show differences from modern humans in both the vertebral body and in the neural arch, although not all Neandertal lumbar vertebrae differ from modern humans in the same way. Differences in the vertebral foramen are restricted to the lowermost lumbar vertebrae (L4 and L5), differences in the orientation of the upper articular facets appear in the uppermost lumbar vertebrae (probably in L1 and L2-L3), and differences in the horizontal angle of the transverse process appear in L2-L4...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434541/phytoliths-indicate-significant-arboreal-cover-at-sahelanthropus-type-locality-tm266-in-northern-chad-and-a-decrease-in-later-sites
#3
Alice Novello, Doris Barboni, Florence Sylvestre, Anne-Elisabeth Lebatard, Christine Paillès, Didier L Bourlès, Andossa Likius, Hassane Taisso Mackaye, Patrick Vignaud, Michel Brunet
We analyzed phytolith and diatom remains preserved at 45 Miocene and Pliocene localities dated between 8 and 1 Ma in northern Chad (16-17°N). Some of these localities yielded cranial remains, lower jaws, and teeth of the hominin species Australopithecus bahrelghazali (∼3.6 Ma) and Sahelanthropus tchadensis (∼7 Ma). Of the 111 sediment samples analyzed, 41 yielded phytoliths, 20 yielded diatoms, and seven yielded both phytoliths and diatoms. Freshwater planktonic and tychoplanktonic diatom species, indicative of lacustrine conditions, are dominant (>91%) in the samples...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434540/an-updated-age-for-the-xujiayao-hominin-from-the-nihewan-basin-north-china-implications-for-middle-pleistocene-human-evolution-in-east-asia
#4
Hong Ao, Chun-Ru Liu, Andrew P Roberts, Peng Zhang, Xinwen Xu
The Xujiayao site in the Nihewan Basin (North China) is one of the most important Paleolithic sites in East Asia. Twenty Homo fossils, which were previously assigned to an archaic Homo sapiens group, have been excavated along with more than 30,000 lithic artifacts and ∼5000 mammalian fossil specimens. Dating of the Xujiayao hominin has been pursued since its excavation in the 1970s, but its age has remained controversial because of limitations of the dating techniques that have been applied to available materials...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434539/evolutionary-anatomy-of-the-neandertal-ulna-and-radius-in-the-light-of-the-new-el-sidr%C3%A3-n-sample
#5
Laura Pérez-Criado, Antonio Rosas
This paper aims to improve our understanding of the phylogenetic trait polarity related to hominin forearm evolution, in particular those traits traditionally defined as "Neandertal features." To this aim, twelve adult and adolescent fragmented forelimb elements (including ulnae and radii) of Homo neanderthalensis recovered from the site of El Sidrón (Asturias, Spain) were examined comparatively using three-dimensional geometric and traditional morphometrics. Mean centroid size and shape comparisons, principal components analysis, and phylogenetic signal analysis were undertaken...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434538/thinking-locally-environmental-reconstruction-of-middle-and-later-stone-age-archaeological-sites-in-ethiopia-kenya-and-zambia-based-on-ungulate-stable-isotopes
#6
Joshua R Robinson
Our knowledge of the Pleistocene environments of Africa consists primarily of data at a scale too coarse to capture the full habitat variation important to hominins 'on the ground.' These environments are complex, highly variable, and poorly understood. As such, data from individual sites are a needed addition to our current paleoenvironmental reconstructions. This study offers a site-based approach focusing on stable isotope analyses of fossil faunal tooth enamel from three archaeological sites in tropical Africa...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434534/comparative-analysis-of-trabecular-bone-structure-and-orientation-in-south-african-hominin-tali
#7
Anne Su, Kristian J Carlson
Tali of several hominin taxa are preserved in the fossil record and studies of the external morphology of these often show a mosaic of human-like and ape-like features. This has contributed to a growing recognition of variability characterizing locomotor kinematics of Australopithecus. In contrast, locomotor kinematics of another Plio-Pleistocene hominin, Paranthropus, are substantially less well-documented, in part, because of the paucity of postcranial fossils securely attributed to the genus. Since the talus transmits locomotor-based loads through the ankle and its internal structure is hypothesized to reflect accommodation to such loads, it is a cornerstone structure for reconstructing locomotor kinematics...
May 2017: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429565/european-acheuleans-northern-v-southern-europe-hominins-technical-behaviour-chronological-and-environmental-contexts-international-conference-national-museum-of-natural-history-paris-france-november-19-21-2014
#8
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28423240/biochemical-cellular-physiological-and-pathological-consequences-of-human-loss-of-n-glycolylneuraminic-acid
#9
Jonathan Okerblom, Ajit Varki
About 2-3 million years ago, Alu-mediated deletion of a critical exon in the CMAH gene became fixed in the hominin lineage ancestral to humans, possibly through a stepwise process of selection by pathogen targeting of the CMAH product (the sialic acid Neu5Gc), followed by reproductive isolation via female anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. Loss of CMAH has occurred independently in some other lineages, but is functionally intact in Old World primates, including our closest relatives, the chimpanzees. While the biophysical and biochemical ramifications of losing tens of millions of Neu5Gc hydroxyl groups at most cell surfaces remains poorly understood, there are multi-scale effects functionally relevant to both sides of the host-pathogen interface...
April 19, 2017: Chembiochem: a European Journal of Chemical Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28418109/sagittal-crest-formation-in-great-apes-and-gibbons
#10
Katharine L Balolia, Christophe Soligo, Bernard Wood
The frequency of sagittal crest expression and patterns of sagittal crest growth and development have been documented in hominoids, including some extinct hominin taxa, and the more frequent expression of the sagittal crest in males has been traditionally linked with the need for larger-bodied individuals to have enough attachment area for the temporalis muscle. In the present study, we investigate sagittal cresting in a dentally mature sample of four hominoid taxa (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, Gorilla gorilla gorilla, Pongo pygmaeus pygmaeus and Hylobates lar)...
April 18, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406571/hominin-hip-biomechanics-changing-perspectives
#11
Anna G Warrener
The shape of the human pelvis reflects the unique demands placed on the hip abductor muscles (gluteus medius and gluteus minimus), which stabilize the body in the frontal plane during bipedal locomotion. This morphological shift occurred early in hominin evolution, yet important shape differences between hominin species have led to significant disagreement about abductor function and locomotor capability in these extinct taxa. A static biomechanical model that relies on a close association between skeletal measurements of the pelvis and femur has traditionally been used to reconstruct hip biomechanics in these species...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406570/pelvic-morphology-in-homo-erectus-and-early-homo
#12
Steven Emilio Churchill, Caroline Vansickle
The evolution of the hominin pelvis is generally seen as involving two broad stages: the establishment of bipedal pelvic morphology by the mid-Pliocene (or earlier), followed by architectural changes necessary to enlarge the birth canal in response to increased encephalization in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo. Pelvic and proximal femoral morphology in early Homo (namely H. erectus) has been seen as transitional between these stages, reflecting structural changes necessitated by greater body size (and perhaps moderate increases in brain size) overlain upon a basically primitive pelvic architecture...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406569/ischial-form-as-an-indicator-of-bipedal-kinematics-in-early-hominins-a-test-using-extant-anthropoids
#13
Kristi L Lewton, Jeremiah E Scott
Human ischia contrast with those of great apes in being craniocaudally short and dorsally projecting. This configuration is thought to facilitate greater hip extension in humans during bipedal locomotion. This link has been used to infer kinematics in early hominins, but the consequences of variation in ischial configuration for gait remain uncertain. Kinematic data for a limited sample of extant nonhuman primates demonstrate that there is variation in hip extension in these taxa during bipedal behaviors-specifically, Hylobates and Ateles are capable of greater extension than Pan and Macaca...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406567/evolution-of-spinopelvic-alignment-in-hominins
#14
Ella Been, Asier Gómez-Olivencia, Sara Shefi, Michalle Soudack, Markus Bastir, Alon Barash
Spinopelvic alignment refers to the interaction between pelvic orientation, spinal curvatures, and the line of gravity. In a healthy modern human, this alignment is characterized by reciprocal curves/orientation of the sacrum, lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, and cervical lordosis. In an economic sagittal posture, these curvatures keep the line of gravity close to the center of the acetabulum. The purpose of this study is to explore the spinopelvic alignment in extinct hominins. We examined spinopelvic alignment of a single representative from each of the following hominin groups: Australopithecus, Homo erectus (H...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406564/neonatal-shoulder-width-suggests-a-semirotational-oblique-birth-mechanism-in-australopithecus-afarensis
#15
Jeremy M DeSilva, Natalie M Laudicina, Karen R Rosenberg, Wenda R Trevathan
Birth mechanics in early hominins are often reconstructed based on cephalopelvic proportions, with little attention paid to neonatal shoulders. Here, we find that neonatal biacromial breadth can be estimated from adult clavicular length (R(2) = 0.80) in primates. Using this relationship and clavicular length from adult Australopithecus afarensis, we estimate biacromial breadth in neonatal australopiths. Combined with neonatal head dimensions, we reconstruct birth in A. afarensis (A.L. 288-1 or Lucy) and find that the most likely mechanism of birth in this early hominin was a semi-rotational oblique birth in which the head engaged and passed through the inlet transversely, but then rotated so that the head and shoulders remained perpendicular and progressed through the midplane and outlet oblique to the main axis of the female pelvis...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406563/evolution-of-the-human-pelvis
#16
Karen R Rosenberg, Jeremy M DeSilva
No bone in the human postcranial skeleton differs more dramatically from its match in an ape skeleton than the pelvis. Humans have evolved a specialized pelvis, well-adapted for the rigors of bipedal locomotion. Precisely how this happened has been the subject of great interest and contention in the paleoanthropological literature. In part, this is because of the fragility of the pelvis and its resulting rarity in the human fossil record. However, new discoveries from Miocene hominoids and Plio-Pleistocene hominins have reenergized debates about human pelvic evolution and shed new light on the competing roles of bipedal locomotion and obstetrics in shaping pelvic anatomy...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406561/lower-ilium-evolution-in-apes-and-hominins
#17
Ashley S Hammond, Sergio Almécija
Elucidating the pelvic morphology of the Pan-Homo last common ancestor (LCA) is crucial for understanding ape and human evolution. The pelvis of Ardipithecus ramidus has been the basis of controversial interpretations of the LCA pelvis. In particular, it was proposed that the lower ilium became elongate independently in the orangutan and chimpanzee clades, making these taxa poor analogues for the pelvis of the LCA. This study examines the variation in relative lower ilium height between and within living and fossil hominoid species (and other anthropoids), and models its evolution using available fossil hominoids as calibration points...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406559/measuring-lateral-iliac-flare-by-different-methods-risks-obscuring-evolutionary-changes-in-the-pelvis
#18
Caroline Vansickle
The orientation and morphology of the hominin ilium is functionally important for locomotion, yet no standard method exists for quantifying its lateral flare. This lack of standardization stems from fossil preservation issues and morphological differences between hominin species. Many techniques have been developed to measure flare based on what is preserved on a single fossil, but this makes comparisons between fossil species challenging. In some cases, methods developed based on australopith morphology are not appropriate for measuring the morphology in genus Homo...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406558/mechanical-constraints-on-the-hominin-pelvis-and-the-obstetrical-dilemma
#19
Christopher Ruff
The "obstetrical dilemma" posits that increases in birth canal dimensions during hominin evolution were constrained by mechanical factors associated with bipedal gait. This model has recently been challenged, in part on the basis of experimental data showing little association between pelvic and proximal femoral dimensions and locomotor costs among human experimental subjects. However, complete rejection of the model is premature, for two reasons: (1) it is difficult to extrapolate experimental results to naturalistic conditions and the much more varied body form and possibly locomotor style of early hominins...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401924/the-human-coparental-bond-implicates-distinct-corticostriatal-pathways-longitudinal-impact-on-family-formation-and-child-well-being
#20
Eyal Abraham, Gadi Gilam, Yaniv Kanat-Maymon, Yael Jacob, Orna Zagoory-Sharon, Talma Hendler, Ruth Feldman
Alloparental care, the cooperative care of offspring by group members other than the biological mother, has been widely practiced since early hominin evolution to increase infant survival and thriving. The coparental bond-a relationship of solidarity and commitment between two adults who join their effort to care for children- is a central contributor to children's well-being and sociality; yet, the neural basis of coparenting has not been studied in humans. Here, we followed 84 first-time co-parents (42 couples) across the first six years of family formation, including opposite-sex and same-sex couples, measured brain response to coparental stimuli, observed collaborative and undermining coparental behaviors in infancy and preschool, assayed oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP), and measured coparenting and child behavior problems at six years...
April 12, 2017: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
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