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HIV crispr cas9

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29872154/hiv-1-inhibition-in-cells-with-cxcr4-mutant-genome-created-by-crispr-cas9-and-piggybac-recombinant-technologies
#1
Shuai Liu, Qiankun Wang, Xiao Yu, Yilin Li, Yandan Guo, Zhepeng Liu, Fuyun Sun, Wei Hou, Chunmei Li, Li Wu, Deyin Guo, Shuliang Chen
The C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) is one of the major co-receptors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry and is considered an important therapeutic target. However, its function in maintaining the development of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) makes it difficult to be used for HIV-1 gene therapy with HSC transplantation. A previous report showed that the natural CXCR4 P191A mutant inhibits HIV-1 infection without any defect in HSC differentiation, which could provide a basis for the development of new approaches for HIV-1 gene therapy...
June 5, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29858049/generation-of-hutat2-fc-knockin-primary-human-monocytes-using-crispr-cas9
#2
Bowen Wang, Jiahui Zuo, Wenzhen Kang, Qianqi Wei, Jianhui Li, Chunfu Wang, Zhihui Liu, Yuanan Lu, Yan Zhuang, Bianli Dang, Qing Liu, Wen Kang, Yongtao Sun
The ability of monocytes to travel through the bloodstream, traverse tissue barriers, and aggregate at disease sites endows these cells with the attractive potential to carry therapeutic genes into the nervous system. However, gene editing in primary human monocytes has long been a challenge. Here, we applied the CRISPR/Cas9 system to deliver the large functional Hutat2:Fc DNA fragment into the genome of primary monocytes to neutralize HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat), an essential neurotoxic factor that causes HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) in the nervous system...
June 1, 2018: Molecular Therapy. Nucleic Acids
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29773895/crispr-cas9-system-targeting-regulatory-genes-of-hiv-1-inhibits-viral-replication-in-infected-t-cell-cultures
#3
Youdiil Ophinni, Mari Inoue, Tomohiro Kotaki, Masanori Kameoka
The CRISPR/Cas9 system provides a novel and promising tool for editing the HIV-1 proviral genome. We designed RNA-guided CRISPR/Cas9 targeting the HIV-1 regulatory genes tat and rev with guide RNAs (gRNA) selected from each gene based on CRISPR specificity and sequence conservation across six major HIV-1 subtypes. Each gRNA was cloned into lentiCRISPRv2 before co-transfection to create a lentiviral vector and transduction into target cells. CRISPR/Cas9 transduction into 293 T and HeLa cells stably expressing Tat and Rev proteins successfully abolished the expression of each protein relative to that in non-transduced and gRNA-absent vector-transduced cells...
May 17, 2018: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29772059/the-orphan-g-protein-coupled-receptor-75-signaling-is-activated-by-the-chemokine-ccl5
#4
Simona Dedoni, Lee A Campbell, Brandon K Harvey, Valeria Avdoshina, Italo Mocchetti
The chemokine CCL5 prevents neuronal cell death mediated both by amyloid β, as well as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral proteins gp120 and Tat. Because CCL5 binds to CCR5, CCR3 and/or CCR1 receptors, it is unclear which of these receptors plays a role in neuroprotection. Indeed, CCL5 also has neuroprotective activity in cells lacking these receptors. CCL5 may bind to a G protein-coupled receptor 75 (GPR75), which encodes for a 540 amino-acid orphan receptor of the Gqα family. In this study, we have used SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells to characterize whether CCL5 could activate a Gq signaling through GPR75...
May 17, 2018: Journal of Neurochemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29732484/crispr-cas9-the-powerful-new-genome-editing-tool-for-putative-therapeutics-in-obesity
#5
REVIEW
María José Franco-Tormo, Mireille Salas-Crisostomo, Nuno Barbosa Rocha, Henning Budde, Sérgio Machado, Eric Murillo-Rodríguez
The molecular technology known as clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein (Cas) is revolutionizing the field of medical research and deepening our understanding of numerous biological processes. The attraction of CRISPR/Cas9 lies in its ability to efficiently edit DNA or modulate gene expression in living eukaryotic cells and organisms, a technology that was once considered either too expensive or scientifically risky. CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully applied in agriculture to develop the next generation of disease-resistant plants...
May 7, 2018: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience: MN
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29644868/crispr-cas9-inhibits-multiple-steps-of-hiv-1-infection
#6
Lijuan Yin, Siqi Hu, Shan Mei, Hong Sun, Fengwen Xu, Jian Li, Weijun Zhu, Xiaoman Liu, Fei Zhao, Di Zhang, Shan Cen, Chen Liang, Fei Guo
CRISPR/Cas9 is an adaptive immune system where bacteria and archaea have evolved to resist the invading viruses and plasmid DNA by creating site-specific double-strand breaks in DNA. This study tested this gene editing system in inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection by targeting the viral long terminal repeat and the gene coding sequences. Strong inhibition of HIV-1 infection by Cas9/gRNA was observed, which resulted not only from insertions and deletions (indels) that were introduced into viral DNA due to Cas9 cleavage, but also from the marked decrease in the levels of the late viral DNA products and the integrated viral DNA...
May 9, 2018: Human Gene Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29625148/genome-scale-screening-identification-of-sacas9-grnas-for-targeting-hiv-1-provirus-and-suppression-of-hiv-1-infection
#7
Qiankun Wang, Shuai Liu, Zhepeng Liu, Zunhui Ke, Chunmei Li, Xiao Yu, Shuliang Chen, Deyin Guo
The CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing approach has been widely used in anti-HIV-1 gene therapy research. However, the major challenges facing the therapeutic application of CRISPR/Cas9 are the precise genome cleavage efficacy and efficient delivery of Cas9/gRNA specifically to the HIV-infected cells. Recently, a small size Cas9 from Staphylococcus aureus (SaCas9) has shown promise in genome editing in eukaryotic cells, suggesting a potential usage in blocking HIV-1 infection by targeting the HIV-1 genome. Here, we designed 43 guide RNAs (gRNAs) against the HIV-1 genome, thereby identifying 8 gRNAs that efficiently and specifically disrupt the target DNA by SaCas9...
May 2, 2018: Virus Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29583154/comparison-of-the-editing-patterns-and-editing-efficiencies-of-talen-and-crispr-cas9-when-targeting-the-human-ccr5-gene
#8
Arildo Nerys-Junior, Luciene P Braga-Dias, Paula Pezzuto, Vinícius Cotta-de-Almeida, Amilcar Tanuri
The human C-C chemokine receptor type-5 (CCR5) is the major transmembrane co-receptor that mediates HIV-1 entry into target CD4+ cells. Gene therapy to knock-out the CCR5 gene has shown encouraging results in providing a functional cure for HIV-1 infection. In gene therapy strategies, the initial region of the CCR5 gene is a hotspot for producing functional gene knock-out. Such target gene editing can be done using programmable endonucleases such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) or clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas9)...
January 2018: Genetics and Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29522311/crispr-cas9-and-genome-editing-for-viral-disease-is-resistance-futile
#9
Harshana S De Silva Feelixge, Daniel Stone, Pavitra Roychoudhury, Martine Aubert, Keith R Jerome
Chronic viral infections remain a major public health issue affecting millions of people worldwide. Highly active antiviral treatments have significantly improved prognosis and infection-related morbidity and mortality but have failed to eliminate persistent viral forms. Therefore, new strategies to either eradicate or control these viral reservoirs are paramount to allow patients to stop antiretroviral therapy and realize a cure. Viral genome disruption based on gene editing by programmable endonucleases is one promising curative gene therapy approach...
March 21, 2018: ACS Infectious Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29437254/crispr-cas9-knockout-of-usp18-enhances-type-i-ifn-responsiveness-and-restricts-hiv-1-infection-in-macrophages
#10
Jared P Taylor, Melanie N Cash, Katherine E Santostefano, Mahito Nakanishi, Naohiro Terada, Mark A Wallet
The IFN-stimulated gene ubiquitin-specific proteinase 18 (USP18) encodes a protein that negatively regulates T1 IFN signaling via stearic inhibition of JAK1 recruitment to the IFN-α receptor 2 subunit (IFNAR2). Here, we demonstrate that USP18 expression is induced by HIV-1 in a T1 IFN-dependent manner. Experimental depletion of USP18 by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) gene editing results in a significant restriction of HIV-1 replication in an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived macrophage model...
February 13, 2018: Journal of Leukocyte Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29373607/editing-of-the-human-trim5-gene-to-introduce-mutations-with-the-potential-to-inhibit-hiv-1
#11
Caroline Dufour, Alix Claudel, Nicolas Joubarne, Natacha Merindol, Tara Maisonnet, Nasser Masroori, Mélodie B Plourde, Lionel Berthoux
The type I interferon (IFN-I)-inducible human restriction factor TRIM5α inhibits the infection of human cells by specific nonhuman retroviruses, such as N-MLV and EIAV, but does not generally target HIV-1. However, the introduction of two aminoacid substitutions, R332G and R355G, in the human TRIM5α (huTRIM5α) domain responsible for retroviral capsid recognition leads to efficient HIV-1 restriction upon stable over-expression. CRISPR-Cas-based approaches to precisely edit DNA could be employed to modify TRIM5 in human cells...
2018: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29250325/modern-biotechnology-based-therapeutic-approaches-against-hiv-infection
#12
Muhammad Imran, Yasir Waheed, Ayesha Ghazal, Sajjad Ullah, Sher Zaman Safi, Muhsin Jamal, Muhammad Ali, Muhammad Atif, Muhammad Imran, Farman Ullah
The causative agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Since its discovery before 30 years, a number of drugs known as highly active antiretroviral therapy have been developed to suppress the life cycle of the virus at different stages. With the current therapeutic approaches, ending AIDS means providing treatment to 35 million individuals living with HIV for the rest of their lives or until a cure is developed. Additionally, therapy is associated with various other challenges such as potential of drug resistance, toxicity and presence of latent viral reservoir...
December 2017: Biomedical Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29215041/crispr-cas9-delivery-with-one-single-adenoviral-vector-devoid-of-all-viral-genes
#13
Eric Ehrke-Schulz, Maren Schiwon, Theo Leitner, Stephan Dávid, Thorsten Bergmann, Jing Liu, Anja Ehrhardt
The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system revolutionized the field of gene editing but viral delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has not been fully explored. Here we adapted clinically relevant high-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdV) devoid of all viral genes for the delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 machinery using a single viral vector. We present a platform enabling fast transfer of the Cas9 gene and gRNA expression units into the HCAdV genome including the option to choose between constitutive or inducible Cas9 expression and gRNA multiplexing...
December 7, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29213273/targeting-trim5%C3%AE-in-hiv-cure-strategies-for-the-crispr-cas9-era
#14
Daryl Anne Victoria Weatherley, Michael Terence Boswell, Sarah L Rowland-Jones
In the past decade, studies of innate immune activity against HIV-1 and other retroviruses have revealed a powerful array of host factors that can attack the virus at various stages of its life cycle in human and primate cells, raising the prospect that these antiviral factors could be manipulated in immunotherapeutic strategies for HIV infection. This has not proved straightforward: while HIV accessory genes encode proteins that subvert or destroy many of these restriction factors, others, such as human TRIM5α show limited potency against HIV-1...
2017: Frontiers in Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29203900/intracellular-immunization-against-hiv-infection-with-an-intracellular-antibody-that-mimics-hiv-integrase-binding-to-the-cellular-ledgf-protein
#15
Leyuan Bao, Clare Hannon, Abimael Cruz-Mignoni, Denis Ptchelkine, Mei-Yi Sun, Ami Miller, Wilawan Bunjobpol, Camilo E Quevedo, Mariliza Derveni, Jennifer Chambers, Alison Simmons, Simon E V Phillips, Terence H Rabbitts
Preventing the protein-protein interaction of the cellular chromatin binding protein Lens Epithelium-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase is an important possible strategy for anti-viral treatment for AIDS. We have used Intracellular Antibody Capture technology to isolate a single VH antibody domain that binds to LEDGF. The crystal structure of the LEDGF-VH complex reveals that the single domain antibody mimics the effect of binding of HIV integrase to LEDGF which is crucial for HIV propagation...
December 4, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29201613/genome-editing-for-cancer-therapy-delivery-of-cas9-protein-sgrna-plasmid-via-a-gold-nanocluster-lipid-core-shell-nanocarrier
#16
Peng Wang, Lingmin Zhang, Yangzhouyun Xie, Nuoxin Wang, Rongbing Tang, Wenfu Zheng, Xingyu Jiang
The type II bacterial clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein) system (CRISPR-Cas9) is a powerful toolbox for gene-editing, however, the nonviral delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 to cells or tissues remains a key challenge. This paper reports a strategy to deliver Cas9 protein and single guide RNA (sgRNA) plasmid by a nanocarrier with a core of gold nanoclusters (GNs) and a shell of lipids. By modifying the GNs with HIV-1-transactivator of transcription peptide, the cargo (Cas9/sgRNA) can be delivered into cell nuclei...
November 2017: Advanced Science (Weinheim, Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29141633/genome-modification-of-cxcr4-by-staphylococcus-aureus-cas9-renders-cells-resistance-to-hiv-1-infection
#17
Qiankun Wang, Shuliang Chen, Qiaoqiao Xiao, Zhepeng Liu, Shuai Liu, Panpan Hou, Li Zhou, Wei Hou, Wenzhe Ho, Chunmei Li, Li Wu, Deyin Guo
BACKGROUND: The CRISPR/Cas9 system has been widely used for genome editing in mammalian cells. CXCR4 is a co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) entry, and loss of CXCR4 function can protect cells from CXCR4 (X4)-tropic HIV-1 infection, making CXCR4 an important target for HIV-1 gene therapy. However, the large size of the CRISPR/SpCas9 system presents an obstacle to its efficient delivery into primary CD4+ T cells. Recently, a small Staphylococcus aureus Cas9 (SaCas9) has been developed as a genome editing tool can address this question...
November 15, 2017: Retrovirology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29119608/synthetic-aav-crispr-vectors-for-blocking-hiv-1-expression-in-persistently-infected-astrocytes
#18
Christine Kunze, Kathleen Börner, Eike Kienle, Tanja Orschmann, Ejona Rusha, Martha Schneider, Milena Radivojkov-Blagojevic, Micha Drukker, Sabrina Desbordes, Dirk Grimm, Ruth Brack-Werner
Astrocytes, the most abundant cells in the mammalian brain, perform key functions and are involved in several neurodegenerative diseases. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can persist in astrocytes, contributing to the HIV burden and neurological dysfunctions in infected individuals. While a comprehensive approach to HIV cure must include the targeting of HIV-1 in astrocytes, dedicated tools for this purpose are still lacking. Here we report a novel Adeno-associated virus-based vector (AAV9P1) with a synthetic surface peptide for transduction of astrocytes...
November 9, 2017: Glia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29114997/in-vitro-modeling-of-hiv-proviral-activity-in-microglia
#19
Lee A Campbell, Christopher T Richie, Yajun Zhang, Emily J Heathward, Lamarque M Coke, Emily Y Park, Brandon K Harvey
Microglia, the resident macrophages of the brain, play a key role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) due to their productive infection by HIV. This results in the release of neurotoxic viral proteins and pro-inflammatory compounds which negatively affect the functionality of surrounding neurons. Because models of HIV infection within the brain are limited, we aimed to create a novel microglia cell line with an integrated HIV provirus capable of recreating several hallmarks of HIV infection...
December 2017: FEBS Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29099045/gene-editing-in-human-lymphoid-cells-role-for-donor-dna-type-of-genomic-nuclease-and-cell-selection-method
#20
Anastasia Zotova, Elena Lopatukhina, Alexander Filatov, Musa Khaitov, Dmitriy Mazurov
Programmable endonucleases introduce DNA breaks at specific sites, which are repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homology recombination (HDR). Genome editing in human lymphoid cells is challenging as these difficult-to-transfect cells may also inefficiently repair DNA by HDR. Here, we estimated efficiencies and dynamics of knockout (KO) and knockin (KI) generation in human T and B cell lines depending on repair template, target loci and types of genomic endonucleases. Using zinc finger nuclease (ZFN), we have engineered Jurkat and CEM cells with the 8...
November 2, 2017: Viruses
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