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neuroimaging review

Mohammad Adawi, Bishara Bisharat, Abdalla Bowirrat
BACKGROUND: Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is an uncommon aggressive, multisystem form of non-Langerhans' cell histocytosis, which was firstly reported by Jakob Erdheim and William chester in 1930. The disease pathological features encompass an aberrant multiplication, overproduction and accumulation of white blood cells called histiocytes within multiple tissues and organs. Herein, we present a case of ECD owing to the rarity of this disease (roughly 550 cases have been described in the literature to date)...
October 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Tristram A Lett, Henrik Walter, Eva J Brandl
Genetic variation underlies both the response to antidepressant treatment and the occurrence of side effects. Over the past two decades, a number of pharmacogenetic variants, among these the SCL6A4, BDNF, FKBP5, GNB3, GRIK4, and ABCB1 genes, have come to the forefront in this regard. However, small effects sizes, mixed results in independent samples, and conflicting meta-analyses results led to inherent difficulties in the field of pharmacogenetics translating these findings into clinical practice. Nearly all antidepressant pharmacogenetic variants have potentially pleiotropic effects in which they are associated with major depressive disorder, intermediate phenotypes involved in emotional processes, and brain areas affected by antidepressant treatment...
October 17, 2016: CNS Drugs
Antonello Baldassarre, Lenny E Ramsey, Joshua S Siegel, Gordon L Shulman, Maurizio Corbetta
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: An important challenge in neurology is identifying the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral deficits after brain injury. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the effects of focal brain lesions on brain networks and behavior. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuroimaging studies indicate that the human brain is organized in large-scale resting state networks (RSNs) defined via functional connectivity, that is the temporal correlation of spontaneous activity between different areas...
October 5, 2016: Current Opinion in Neurology
Qian Zhao, Xueqi Chen, Yun Zhou
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, causing changes in memory, thinking, and other dysfunction of brain functions. More and more people are suffering from the disease. Early neuroimaging techniques of AD are needed to develop. This review provides a preliminary summary of the various neuroimaging techniques that have been explored for in vivo imaging of AD. Recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, such as functional MR imaging (fMRI) and diffusion MRI, give opportunities to display not only anatomy and atrophy of the medial temporal lobe, but also at microstructural alterations or perfusion disturbance within the AD lesions...
March 2016: Brain Informatics
Bokai Cao, Xiangnan Kong, Philip S Yu
With rapid advances in neuroimaging techniques, the research on brain disorder identification has become an emerging area in the data mining community. Brain disorder data poses many unique challenges for data mining research. For example, the raw data generated by neuroimaging experiments is in tensor representations, with typical characteristics of high dimensionality, structural complexity, and nonlinear separability. Furthermore, brain connectivity networks can be constructed from the tensor data, embedding subtle interactions between brain regions...
December 2015: Brain Informatics
Stefania Prendes-Alvarez, Charles B Nemeroff
Personalized or precision medicine is a medical discipline that proposes tailoring health care to each individual by integrating data from their genetic makeup, epigenetic modifications, other biomarkers, clinical symptoms and environmental exposures. Currently, patients typically present for treatment of mood disorders relatively late in the disease course and this is of great concern both because delay in attaining remission reduces the success of subsequent treatment and depressive episodes have negative cumulative effects on the brain and body...
October 13, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Monica E Ellwood-Lowe, Matthew D Sacchet, Ian H Gotlib
In the nascent field of the cognitive neuroscience of socioeconomic status (SES), researchers are using neuroimaging to examine how growing up in poverty affects children's neurocognitive development, particularly their language abilities. In this review we highlight difficulties inherent in the frequent use of reverse inference to interpret SES-related abnormalities in brain regions that support language. While there is growing evidence suggesting that SES moderates children's developing brain structure and function, no studies to date have elucidated explicitly how these neural findings are related to variations in children's language abilities, or precisely what it is about SES that underlies or contributes to these differences...
October 3, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
Timm B Poeppl, Berthold Langguth, Rainer Rupprecht, Adam Safron, Danilo Bzdok, Angela R Laird, Simon B Eickhoff
Sexuality as to its etymology presupposes the duality of sexes. Using quantitative neuroimaging meta-analyses, we demonstrate robust sex differences in the neural processing of sexual stimuli in thalamus, hypothalamus, and basal ganglia. In a narrative review, we show how these relate to the well-established sex differences on the behavioral level. More specifically, we describe the neural bases of known poor agreement between self-reported and genital measures of female sexual arousal, of previously proposed male proneness to affective sexual conditioning, as well as hints of unconscious activation of bonding mechanisms during sexual stimulation in women...
October 11, 2016: Frontiers in Neuroendocrinology
Pierre R Bourque, Gabrielle Bourque, William Miller, John Woulfe, Jodi Warman Chardon
Perineural invasion is a targeted cellular proliferation guided by neurotrophins, rather than a simple diffusion of tumor in a path of least resistance. Invasion of cranial nerves by squamous cell carcinoma can represent an important diagnostic dilemma. It commonly presents as a distinct clinical neurological syndrome of combined isolated trigeminal and facial neuropathies. The focal cancer source may have been overlooked or remain occult. This case series illustrates diverse clinical presentations and neuroimaging challenges in four patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cranial nerves...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience: Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
Konstantin Balashov
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article focuses on neuroimaging in multiple sclerosis (MS), the most common central nervous system (CNS) demyelinating disorder encountered by practicing neurologists. Less common adult demyelinating disorders and incidental subclinical white matter abnormalities that are often considered in the differential diagnosis of MS are also reviewed. RECENT FINDINGS: Advancements in neuroimaging techniques, eg, the application of ultrahigh-field MRI, are rapidly expanding the use of neuroimaging in CNS demyelinating disorders...
October 2016: Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology
Michelle P Lin, David S Liebeskind
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article provides an overview of cerebrovascular hemodynamics, acute stroke pathophysiology, and collateral circulation, which are pivotal in the modern imaging of ischemic stroke that guides the care of the patient with stroke. RECENT FINDINGS: Neuroimaging provides extensive information on the brain and vascular health. Multimodal CT and MRI delineate the hemodynamics of ischemic stroke that may be used to guide treatment decisions and prognosticate regarding expected outcomes...
October 2016: Continuum: Lifelong Learning in Neurology
Michele Porcu, Antonella Balestrieri, Paolo Siotto, Pierleone Lucatelli, Michele Anzidei, Jasjit S Suri, Fulvio Zaccagna, Giovanni Maria Argiolas, Luca Saba
Mood disorders (MD) are important and frequent psychiatric pathologies, and the management of the patients affected by thes conditions represent an important factor of disability and a huge problem in socialterms and an economic burden. The "in-vivo" studies can help researchers to understand the first events at the base of the development of the pathology and to identify the molecular and non-molecular targets of therapies, but theyhave strong limitations due to the fact that human brain circuitsthem selvesare difficult to be reproduced in animal models...
October 10, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
Cali F Bartholomeusz, Vanessa L Cropley, Cassandra Wannan, Maria Di Biase, Patrick D McGorry, Christos Pantelis
OBJECTIVE: This review critically examines the structural neuroimaging evidence in psychotic illness, with a focus on longitudinal imaging across the first-episode psychosis and ultra-high-risk of psychosis illness stages. METHODS: A thorough search of the literature involving specifically longitudinal neuroimaging in early illness stages of psychosis was conducted. The evidence supporting abnormalities in brain morphology and altered neurodevelopmental trajectories is discussed in the context of a clinical staging model...
October 12, 2016: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Raphaël Mizzi, George A Michael
Over the past few decades, evidence has accumulated showing that, at subcortical levels, visual attention depends partly on the extrageniculate neural pathways, that is, those pathways that bypass the lateral geniculate nucleus and circumvent the primary visual cortex. Working in concert with neuroscience, experimental psychology has contributed considerably to the understanding of the role these pathways play through the use of 3 behavioral cues: nasal-temporal asymmetries, responses to S-cone stimuli, and responses to perceptually suppressed stimuli...
October 10, 2016: Psychological Review
Huanfen Zhou, Wei Wang, Quangang Xu, Shaoying Tan, Shuo Zhao, Mo Yang, Chunxia Peng, Shihui Wei
Purpose. Although optic neuritis (ON) in children is relatively common, visual outcomes and factors associated with the condition have not been well documented. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical features and visual outcomes of ON in Chinese children. Methods. Patients with a first episode of ON at a tertiary neuroophthalmic centre in China were assessed and followed up for at least three months. Visual outcomes and clinical, laboratory, and neuroimaging findings were reviewed. In patients with bilateral ON, only the eyes with worse visual acuity (VA) at presentation were used for statistical analysis...
2016: Journal of Ophthalmology
Caitlin E Rancher, Jody M Shoemaker, Linda E Petree, Mark Holdsworth, John P Phillips, Deborah L Helitzer
BACKGROUND: Returning neuroimaging incidental findings (IF) may create a challenge to research participants' health literacy skills as they must interpret and make appropriate healthcare decisions based on complex radiology jargon. Disclosing IF can therefore present difficulties for participants, research institutions and the healthcare system. The purpose of this study was to identify the extent of the health literacy challenges encountered when returning neuroimaging IF. We report on findings from a retrospective survey and focus group sessions with major stakeholders involved in disclosing IF...
October 11, 2016: BMC Medical Ethics
Ali A Asadi-Pooya, Marjan Asadollahi, Krzysztof Bujarski, Amin H Rabiei, Narsis Aminian, Dale Wyeth, Michael R Sperling
PURPOSE: Ictal verbal help-seeking has never been systematically studied before. In this study, we evaluated a series of patients with ictal verbal help-seeking to characterize its frequency and underlying etiology. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all the long-term video-EEG reports from Jefferson Comprehensive Epilepsy Center over a 12-year period (2004-2015) for the occurrence of the term "help" in the text body. All the extracted reports were reviewed and patients with at least one episode of documented ictal verbal help-seeking in epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) were studied...
October 7, 2016: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
Vinit Baliyan, Chandan J Das, Raju Sharma, Arun Kumar Gupta
Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is a method of signal contrast generation based on the differences in Brownian motion. DWI is a method to evaluate the molecular function and micro-architecture of the human body. DWI signal contrast can be quantified by apparent diffusion coefficient maps and it acts as a tool for treatment response evaluation and assessment of disease progression. Ability to detect and quantify the anisotropy of diffusion leads to a new paradigm called diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). DTI is a tool for assessment of the organs with highly organised fibre structure...
September 28, 2016: World Journal of Radiology
Lauren E Salminen, Thomas E Conturo, Jacob D Bolzenius, Ryan P Cabeen, Erbil Akbudak, Robert H Paul
Technological advances over recent decades now allow for in vivo observation of human brain tissue through the use of neuroimaging methods. While this field originated with techniques capable of capturing macrostructural details of brain anatomy, modern methods such as diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) that are now regularly implemented in research protocols have the ability to characterize brain microstructure. DTI has been used to reveal subtle micro-anatomical abnormalities in the prodromal phase ofº various diseases and also to delineate "normal" age-related changes in brain tissue across the lifespan...
April 2016: Technology and Innovation
Andrea Murru, Bernardo Carpiniello
The first psychotic episode is classically viewed as a critical period which management is important in determining the long-term outcome of the schizophrenia (SCZ). For this reason, the duration of untreated illness (DUI), defined as the interval between the onset of the psychiatric disorder and the administration of the first pharmacological treatment, is a clinical variable that has been increasingly investigated due to its potentially modifiable nature and its value as a predictor of outcome. DUI is poorly applicable and highly unreliable in psychosis...
October 4, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
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