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Thalamus glutamate

Richard Teke Ngomba, Gilles van Luijtelaar
Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors are expressed in key regions of the cortex and the thalamus and are known to regulate spike and wave discharges (SWDs), the electroclinical hallmarks of absence seizures. Recent preclinical studies have highlighted the therapeutic potential of selective group I and III mGlu receptor subtype allosteric modulators, which can suppress pathological SWDs. Of particular interest are positive allosteric modulators (PAMs) for mGlu5 receptors, as they currently show the most promise as novel anti-absence epilepsy drugs...
March 13, 2018: Current Opinion in Pharmacology
Yun Zhou, Bjørnar Hassel, Tore Eid, Niels Christian Danbolt
The excitatory amino acid transporter type 2 (EAAT2) represents the major mechanism for removal of extracellular glutamate. In the hippocampus, there is some EAAT2 in axon-terminals, whereas most of the protein is found in astroglia. The functional importance of the neuronal EAAT2 is unknown, and it is debated whether EAAT2 expressing nerve terminals are present in other parts of the brain. Here we selectively deleted the EAAT2 gene in neurons (by crossing EAAT2-flox mice with synapsin 1-Cre mice in the C57B6 background)...
March 9, 2018: Neurochemistry International
Mana Ogawa, Toshitada Nagai, Yoshikazu Saito, Hitonari Miyaguchi, Kei Kumakura, Keiko Abe, Tomiko Asakura
Mastication enhances brain function and mental health, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of mastication on neural development in early childhood. Therefore, we analysed the gene expression in juvenile neural circuits in rats fed with a soft or chow diet immediately after weaning. We observed that the gene expression patterns in the thalamus varied depending on the diet. Furthermore, gene ontology analysis revealed that two terms were significantly enhanced: chemical synaptic transmission and positive regulation of dendritic spine morphogenesis...
March 7, 2018: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Jan-Willem Thielen, Donghyun Hong, Seyedmorteza Rohani Rankouhi, Jens Wiltfang, Guillén Fernández, David G Norris, Indira Tendolkar
The classical model of the declarative memory system describes the hippocampus and its interactions with representational brain areas in posterior neocortex as being essential for the formation of long-term episodic memories. However, new evidence suggests an extension of this classical model by assigning the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) a specific, yet not fully defined role in episodic memory. In this study, we utilized 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis to lend further support for the idea of a mnemonic role of the mPFC in humans...
February 27, 2018: Human Brain Mapping
Luke Joseph Bogart, Patricio O'Donnell
Several aspects of schizophrenia can be mimicked acutely in healthy human volunteers via administration of NMDA glutamate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists. As these agents decrease firing rates in prefrontal cortical (PFC) GABAergic fast-spiking interneurons (FSI) in animal studies, a leading hypothesis on schizophrenia pathophysiology is that NMDAR in FSI are impaired. However, whole-cell recordings of FSI in slices of adult mouse PFC revealed limited amounts of NMDAR-mediated current. Since those studies used local electrical stimulation to activate a heterogeneous set of synaptic inputs to the recorded cell, it is unclear whether specific afferent inputs may preferentially drive NMDAR responses in FSI...
February 26, 2018: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Kirsten Borup Bojesen, Kasper Aagaard Andersen, Sophie Nordahl Rasmussen, Lone Baandrup, Line Malmer Madsen, Birte Yding Glenthøj, Egill Rostrup, Brian Villumsen Broberg
Progressive loss of brain tissue is seen in some patients with schizophrenia and might be caused by increased levels of glutamate and resting cerebral blood flow (rCBF) alterations. Animal studies suggest that the normalisation of glutamate levels decreases rCBF and prevents structural changes in hippocampus. However, the relationship between glutamate and rCBF in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of humans has not been studied in the absence of antipsychotics and illness chronicity. Ketamine is a noncompetitive N -methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist that transiently induces schizophrenia-like symptoms and neurobiological disturbances in healthy volunteers (HVs)...
2018: Frontiers in Psychiatry
John F Bowyer, Karen M Tranter, Sumit Sarkar, Joseph P Hanig
Thiamine/ vitamin B1 deficiency can lead to behavioral changes and neurotoxicity in humans. This may due in part to vascular damage, neuroinflammation and neuronal degeneration in the diencephalon, which is seen in animal models of pyrithiamine-enhanced thiamine deficiency. However, the time course of the progression of these changes in the animal models has been poorly characterized. Therefore, in this study, the progression of: 1) activated microglial association with vasculature; 2) neurodegeneration; and 3) any vascular leakage in the forebrain during the progress of thiamine deficiency were determined...
February 7, 2018: Neurotoxicology
Xuan Li, Kailyn Witonsky, Olivia M Lofaro, Felicia Surjono, Jianjun Zhang, Jennifer M Bossert, Yavin Shaham
Relapse to methamphetamine (Meth) seeking progressively increases after withdrawal from drug self-administration (incubation of Meth craving). We previously demonstrated a role of dorsomedial striatum (DMS) dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) in this incubation. Here, we studied the role of afferent glutamatergic projections into DMS and local D1R-glutamate interaction in this incubation in male rats.We first measured projection-specific activation on day 30 relapse test by using CTb (retrograde tracer) + Fos (activity marker) double-labeling in projection areas...
January 25, 2018: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Rafael Coveñas, Arturo Mangas, Manuel Lisardo Sànchez, Diana Cadena, Marianne Husson, Michel Geffard
This review updates the findings about the anatomical distribution (using immunohistochemical techniques) and possible functions of D-glutamate in the central nervous system of mammals, as well as compares the distribution of D-glutamate with the distribution of the most studied D-amino acids: D-serine and D-aspartate. The protocol used to obtain highly specific antisera directed against D-amino acids is also reported. Immunoreactivity for D-glutamate was found in dendrites and cell bodies, but not in nerve fibers...
January 24, 2018: Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica
Yasutake Nakano, Fuyuki Karube, Yasuharu Hirai, Kenta Kobayashi, Hiroyuki Hioki, Shinichiro Okamoto, Hiroshi Kameda, Fumino Fujiyama
In rodents, the dorsolateral striatum regulates voluntary movement by integrating excitatory inputs from the motor-related cerebral cortex and thalamus to produce contingent inhibitory output to other basal ganglia nuclei. Striatal parvalbumin (PV)-producing interneurons receiving this excitatory input then inhibit medium spiny neurons (MSNs) and modify their outputs. To understand basal ganglia function in motor control, it is important to reveal the precise synaptic organization of motor-related cortical and thalamic inputs to striatal PV interneurons...
January 4, 2018: Journal of Neuroscience Research
Robert K McNamara, Jennifer D Schurdak, Ruth H Asch, Diana M Lindquist
Although attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is associated with deficits in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 fatty acid implicated in dopamine and glutamate synaptic plasticity, its role in neuroplastic brain changes that occur following repeated amphetamine (AMPH) treatment are not known. This study used pharmacological magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the impact of repeated AMPH exposure and alterations in brain DHA levels on AMPH-induced brain activation patterns. Male rats were fed a diet with no n-3 fatty acids (Deficient, DEF, n = 20), a diet fortified with preformed DHA (fish oil, FO, n = 20), or a control diet fortified with alpha-linolenic acid (n = 20) from P21 to P90...
December 29, 2017: Nutritional Neuroscience
Yanfang Zhao, Junfang Zhang, Hualan Yang, Dongyang Cui, Jiaojiao Song, Qianqian Ma, Wenjie Luan, Bin Lai, Lan Ma, Ming Chen, Ping Zheng
BACKGROUND: Drug addiction is a chronic brain disorder characterized by the compulsive use of drugs. The study of chronic morphine-induced adaptation in the brain and its functional significance is of importance to understand the mechanism of morphine addiction. Previous studies have found a number of chronic morphine-induced adaptive changes at molecular levels in the brain. A study from our lab showed that chronic morphine-induced increases in the expression of D1 receptors at presynaptic terminals coming from other structures to the basolateral amygdala (BLA) played an important role in environmental cue-induced retrieval of morphine withdrawal memory...
December 27, 2017: BMC Biology
David M Niddam, Kuan-Lin Lai, Shang-Yueh Tsai, Yi-Ru Lin, Wei-Ta Chen, Jong-Ling Fuh, Shuu-Jiun Wang
Migraine chronification is associated with a dysfunctional thalamocortical pathway. The present study addressed whether abnormal concentrations of neurochemicals exist in key brain regions of this pathway in chronic migraine. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of the bilateral medial walls of the brain was used to measure choline, creatine, glutamate and glutamine, myo-inositol, and N-acetyl-aspartate in chronic migraine patients and in matched groups of episodic migraine patients and healthy controls...
February 1, 2018: Brain: a Journal of Neurology
Gaetano Barbagallo, Gennarina Arabia, Fabiana Novellino, Rita Nisticò, Maria Salsone, Maurizio Morelli, Federico Rocca, Andrea Quattrone, Manuela Caracciolo, Umberto Sabatini, Andrea Cherubini, Aldo Quattrone
INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to investigate the thalamic biochemical profile in patients with essential tremor (ET), using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1 H-MRS), and to explore the correlations between clinical and biochemical data. METHODS: Sixteen patients with ET and 14 healthy controls participated in this study. After conventional MR imaging, single-voxel1 H-MRS (TR = 2000 ms; TE = 28 ms) was performed by using a PROBE-SV system implemented on a 3-T scanner...
February 2018: Parkinsonism & related Disorders
Tomoteru Yamasaki, Masayuki Fujinaga, Wakana Mori, Yiding Zhang, Hidekatsu Wakizaka, Nobuki Nengaki, Lin Xie, Akiko Hatori, Ming-Rong Zhang
Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 1 (mGluR1) is a crucial pharmacological target for several central nervous system disorders. In this study, we aimed to monitor in vivo regional changes of mGluR1 related to neuroinflammation in the brains of rats after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (PISE) using longitudinal positron emission tomography (PET). PISE was induced in rats by administering lithium chloride, followed by repeated pilocarpine hydrochloride treatments. PET assessments were conducted using N-[4-[6-(isopropylamino)-pyrimidin-4-yl]-1,3-thiazol-2-yl]-N-methyl-4-[(11)C]methylbenzamide ([(11)C]ITDM), a selective radioligand for mGluR1, and N-benzyl-N-[(11)C]methyl-2-(7-methyl-8-oxo-2-phenyl-7,8-dihydro-9H-purin-9-yl)acetamide ([(11)C]DAC), a selective translocator protein PET ligand for neuroinflammation monitoring...
November 2, 2017: Scientific Reports
Alessandra Matzeu, Marsida Kallupi, Olivier George, Paul Schweitzer, Rémi Martin-Fardon
The orexin (Orx) system plays a critical role in drug addiction and reward-related behaviors. The dynorphin (Dyn) system promotes depressive-like behavior and plays a key role in the aversive effects of stress. Orx and Dyn are co-released and have opposing functions in reward and motivation in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Previous studies suggested that OrxA transmission in the posterior paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus (pPVT) participates in cocaine-seeking behavior. This study determined whether Orx and Dyn interact in the pPVT...
October 20, 2017: Neuropsychopharmacology: Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Robert K McNamara, Ruth H Asch, Jennifer D Schurdak, Diana M Lindquist
Major psychiatric disorders are associated with dysregulated glutamate homeostasis and deficits in the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). This study determined the effects of dietary-induced alterations in brain DHA accrual on cortical glutamate homeostasis in the adult rat brain. Adolescent rats were fed a control diet (n = 20), a n-3 fatty acid-deficient diet (DEF, n = 20), or a fish oil-fortified diet containing preformed DHA (FO, n = 20). In adulthood (1)H MRS scans were performed with voxels in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and thalamus...
December 30, 2017: Psychiatry Research
Júlia Gasull-Camós, Maria Luisa Soto-Montenegro, Marta Casquero-Veiga, Manuel Desco, Francesc Artigas, Anna Castañé
Background: Glutamatergic neurotransmission has emerged as a novel target in antidepressant drug development, with a critical role of the ventral anterior cingulate cortex. We recently reported that blockade of the astrocytic glutamate transporter GLT-1 with dihydrokainic acid in infralimbic cortex (rodent equivalent of ventral anterior cingulate cortex), but not in the adjacent prelimbic cortex, evoked robust antidepressant-like effects through α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor activation and increased serotonin release...
December 1, 2017: International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology
Minoru Ohshima, Chiaki Itami, Fumitaka Kimura
KEY POINTS: The effects of noradrenaline on excitatory synaptic transmission to regular spiking (excitatory) cells as well as regular spiking non-pyramidal and fast spiking (both inhibitory) cells in cortical layer 4 were studied in thalamocortical slice preparations, focusing on vertical input from thalamus and layer 2/3 in the mouse barrel cortex. Excitatory synaptic responses were suppressed by noradrenaline. However, currents induced by iontophoretically applied glutamate were not suppressed...
November 15, 2017: Journal of Physiology
John P Hegarty, Meng Gu, Daniel M Spielman, Sue C Cleveland, Joachim F Hallmayer, Laura C Lazzeroni, Mira M Raman, Thomas W Frazier, Jennifer M Phillips, Allan L Reiss, Antonio Y Hardan
Multiple lines of research have reported thalamic abnormalities in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that are associated with social communication impairments (SCI), restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRB), or sensory processing abnormalities (SPA). Thus, the thalamus may represent a common neurobiological structure that is shared across symptom domains in ASD. Same-sex monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs with and without ASD underwent cognitive/behavioral evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging to assess the thalamus...
February 2, 2018: Progress in Neuro-psychopharmacology & Biological Psychiatry
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