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neuro physiology

Andreas Venhorst, Dominic P Micklewright, Timothy D Noakes
INTRODUCTION: A three-dimensional framework of centrally regulated and goal-directed exercise behaviour emphasised the integration of distinct sensory-discriminatory, affective-motivational and cognitive-evaluative dimensions that underpin perceived fatigability. This study aimed to capture the complex interdependencies and temporal dynamics in these processes, their interrelations with observed pacing behaviour, performance and biochemical variables as well as their performance level- and competition outcome-dependent variances...
March 12, 2018: Sports Medicine
Andrew G Lee, Thomas H Mader, C Robert Gibson, Tyson J Brunstetter, William J Tarver
Interesting novel and somewhat perplexing physiologic and pathologic neuro-ocular findings have been documented in astronauts during and after long duration space flight (LDSF). These findings collectively have been termed the "space flight-associated neuro-ocular syndrome" (SANS). The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in the United States has meticulously and prospectively documented the clinical, ultrasound, optical coherence tomography imaging, and radiographic findings of SANS including unilateral and bilateral optic disc edema, globe flattening, choroidal and retinal folds, hyperopic refractive error shifts, and nerve fiber layer infarcts (i...
March 12, 2018: Eye
Valentina Prando, Francesca Da Broi, Mauro Franzoso, Anna Pia Plazzo, Nicola Pianca, Maura Francolini, Cristina Basso, Matthew W Kay, Tania Zaglia, Marco Mongillo
AIM: Cardiac sympathetic neurons (SNs) finely tune the rate and strength of heart contractions to match the blood demand, both at rest and during acute stresses, through the release of norepinephrine (NE). Junctional sites at the interface between the two cell types have been observed, but whether direct neuro-cardiac coupling has a role in heart physiology has not thus far been clearly demonstrated. METHODS AND RESULTS: We investigated the dynamics of SN/cardiomyocyte intercellular signalling, both by FRET-based imaging of cAMP in co-cultures, as a readout of cardiac β-AR activation, and in vivo, using optogenetics in transgenic mice with SN-specific expression of Channelrhodopsin-2...
March 10, 2018: Journal of Physiology
Weiguo Yang, Qian-Quan Sun
We used ChR2-assisted circuit mapping (CRACM) to examine neuronal/compartmental excitatory and inhibitory synaptic balance (E-I balance) in pyramidal cells (PCs) located in several brain regions (including both neocortices and paleocortices). Within the vS1, different inputs on the same neurons, or the same inputs formed on different targets, induced different E/I ratios. E/I ratios in PCs from different regions were largely different. Chemogenetic silencing of somatostatin (SOM)- or parvalbumin (PV)-containing interneurons (INs) while optogenetically activating long-range M1 inputs demonstrated differential contribution of PV and SOM INs to the E/I ratios in a layer-specific manner in S1...
March 5, 2018: Scientific Reports
Hugo Angleys, Sune N Jespersen, Leif Østergaard
Neurovascular coupling mechanisms give rise to vasodilation and functional hyperemia upon neural activation, thereby altering blood oxygenation. This blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast allows studies of activation patterns in the working human brain by functional MRI (fMRI). The BOLD-weighted fMRI signal shows characteristic transients in relation to functional activation, such as the so-called initial dip, overshoot, and post-stimulus undershoot. These transients are modulated by other physiological stimuli and in disease, but the underlying physiological mechanisms remain incompletely understood...
March 2, 2018: Human Brain Mapping
Cristiano Cuppini, Barry E Stein, Benjamin A Rowland
The ability to integrate information across its multiple senses enhances the brain's ability to detect, localize, and identify external events. This process has been well-documented in single neurons in the superior colliculus (SC), which synthesize concordant combinations of visual, auditory, and/or somatosensory signals to enhance the vigor of their responses. This increases the physiological salience of cross-modal events and, in turn, the speed and accuracy of SC-mediated behavioral responses to them. However, this capability is not an innate feature of the circuit, and only develops postnatally after the animal acquires sufficient experience with covariant cross-modal events to form links between their modality-specific components...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Andrea Fanelli, Rohan Jaishankar, Aristotelis Filippidis, James Holsapple, Thomas Heldt
OBJECTIVES:  Our objective was to develop, deploy, and test a data-acquisition system for the reliable and robust archiving of high-resolution physiological waveform data from a variety of bedside monitoring devices, including the GE Solar 8000i patient monitor, and for the logging of ancillary clinical and demographic information. MATERIALS AND METHODS:  The data-acquisition system consists of a computer-based archiving unit and a GE Tram Rac 4A that connects to the GE Solar 8000i monitor...
2018: Acta Neurochirurgica. Supplement
Thibault Warlop, Christine Detrembleur, Gaëtan Stoquart, Thierry Lejeune, Anne Jeanjean
Variability raises considerable interest as a promising and sensitive marker of dysfunction in physiology, in particular in neurosciences. Both internally (e.g., pathology) and/or externally (e.g., environment) generated perturbations and the neuro-mechanical responses to them contribute to the fluctuating dynamics of locomotion. Defective internal gait control in Parkinson's disease (PD), resulting in typical timing gait disorders, is characterized by the breakdown of the temporal organization of stride duration variability...
2018: Frontiers in Physiology
Sebastian S James, Chris Papapavlou, Alexander Blenkinsop, Alexander J Cope, Sean R Anderson, Konstantinos Moustakas, Kevin N Gurney
To date, realistic models of how the central nervous system governs behavior have been restricted in scope to the brain, brainstem or spinal column, as if these existed as disembodied organs. Further, the model is often exercised in relation to an in vivo physiological experiment with input comprising an impulse, a periodic signal or constant activation, and output as a pattern of neural activity in one or more neural populations. Any link to behavior is inferred only indirectly via these activity patterns...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Jason S Bradfield, Olujimi A Ajijola, Marmar Vaseghi, Kalyanam Shivkumar
Ventricular arrhythmias are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths every year. Catheter ablation of ventricular tachycardia (VT) is an essential component of the management of these life-threatening arrhythmias. However, in many patients, despite medical and interventional therapy, VT recurs. Further, some VT substrates (mid-myocardial, left ventricular summit, intra-septal) are not easily targeted, due to limitations of currently available technology. In certain clinical settings, ventricular fibrillation (VF) episodes that have premature ventricular contraction (PVC) triggers can also be targeted with catheter ablation...
February 14, 2018: Heart Rhythm: the Official Journal of the Heart Rhythm Society
Guofu Shen, Schuyler Link, Sandeep Kumar, Derek M Nusbaum, Dennis Y Tse, Yingbin Fu, Samuel M Wu, Benjamin J Frankfort
Elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) can result in multiple neurologic sequelae including vision loss. Inducible models of ICP elevation are lacking in model organisms, which limits our understanding of the mechanism by which increased ICP impacts the visual system. We adapted a mouse model for the sustained elevation of ICP and tested the hypothesis that elevated ICP impacts the optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). ICP was elevated and maintained for 2 weeks, and resulted in multiple anatomic changes that are consistent with human disease including papilledema, loss of physiologic cupping, and engorgement of the optic nerve head...
February 12, 2018: Scientific Reports
Wei Hung Chang, I Hui Lee, Mei Hung Chi, Shih-Hsien Lin, Kao Chin Chen, Po See Chen, Nan Tsing Chiu, Wei Jen Yao, Yen Kuang Yang
Top-down regulation in the human brain and anatomical connections between the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and specific catecholamine-related regions have been well-studied. However, the way in which the PFC modulates downstream neuro-networks in terms of serotonin and the autonomic nervous system (ANS) by variation in the level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is still unclear. We recruited sixty-seven healthy subjects. Serotonin transporter (SERT) availability was examined by SPECT with [ 123 I]ADAM analysis; heart rate variability (HRV) testing was performed, and the BDNF level was measured...
February 7, 2018: Scientific Reports
Neha Mishra, Sonam Lata, Priyanka Deshmukh, Kajal Kamat, Avadhesha Surolia, Tanushree Banerjee
Cellular stress like ER and oxidative stress are the principle causative agents of various proteinopathies. Multifunctional protein PARK7/DJ-1 provides protection against cellular stress. Recently, insulin/IGF also has emerged as a neuro-protective molecule. However, it is not known whether DJ-1 and insulin/IGF complement each other for cellular protection in response to stress. In this study, we show for the first time, that in human and mouse neuronal cell lines, down regulation of DJ-1 for 48 h leads to compensatory upregulation of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) pathway genes, namely, insulin receptor, insulin receptor substrate, and Akt under normal physiological conditions as well as in cellular stress conditions...
February 7, 2018: BioFactors
Haytham Eloqayli
Despite the accumulating neuro-physiological evidence of myofascial pain, many clinicians are skeptical about its existence as a separate disease entity. No single theory can fully explain the four cardinal features of MPS; taut bands, local tenderness, local twitching and the characteristic pattern of referred pain. Bridging the gap between basic and clinical knowledge mandates coupling the local trigger point changes with the clinically seen distant somatically innervated referred pain. The main question addressed by the present theory is why do trigger points behave differently in comparison to the surrounding muscle tissue and are trigger points the primary problem or secondary to a primary pathology...
February 2018: Medical Hypotheses
Hélène Hirbec, Camille Marmai, Isabelle Duroux-Richard, Christine Roubert, Arnaud Esclangon, Séverine Croze, Joël Lachuer, Ronan Peyroutou, François Rassendren
Microglial cells have a double life as the immune cells of the brain in times of stress but have also specific physiological functions in homeostatic conditions. In pathological contexts, microglia undergo a phenotypic switch called "reaction" that promotes the initiation and the propagation of neuro-inflammation. Reaction is complex, molecularly heterogeneous and still poorly characterized, leading to the concept that microglial reactivity might be too diverse to be molecularly defined. However, it remains unknown whether reactive microglia from different pathological contexts share a common molecular signature...
February 5, 2018: Glia
Mohamad Hasyizan Hassan, Wan Mohd Nazaruddin Wan Hassan, Rhendra Hardy Mohd Zaini, Wan Fadzlina Wan Muhd Shukeri, Huda Zainal Abidin, Chong Soon Eu
Background: Normal saline (NS) is a common fluid of choice in neurosurgery and neuro-intensive care unit (ICU), but it does not contain other electrolytes and has the potential to cause hyperchloremic metabolic acidosis with prolonged infusion. These problems may be reduced with the availability of balanced fluid (BF), which becomes a more physiological isotonic solution with the presence of complete electrolyte content. This study aimed to compare the changes in electrolytes and acid-base between NS and BF (Sterofundin® ISO) therapy for post-operative severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients in neuro-ICU...
October 2017: Malaysian Journal of Medical Sciences: MJMS
Sarah I Sheikh
Sarah Isabel Sheikh speaks to Laura Dormer, Commissioning Editor: Sarah I Sheikh, MD, MSc, MRCP, is a Senior Medical Director in Late Stage Clinical Development at Biogen. Her current focus is on developing therapies for multiple sclerosis/neuroinflammation, remyelination and neuro-repair. Prior to Biogen, Dr Sheikh was an attending in Neurology at Brigham and Women's Hospital. She completed her internship at Massachusetts General Hospital and residency in Neurology and Neuromuscular fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women's Hospital...
January 31, 2018: Neurodegenerative Disease Management
M-A Peyron, V Santé-Lhoutellier, O François, M Hennequin
In the elderly, masticatory function often presents failure in certain oral tasks due to impairment such as decline in muscular force, jaw or tongue motility, neuro-muscular coordination, tooth damage, malocclusion and saliva production. Great disparity is observed in the various and potentially cumulative oral declines that occur with ageing. Such difficulties may have an impact on food consumption and nutritional status. To obtain better understanding of the consequences of several oral deficiencies, a series of swallowable boluses were prepared in vitro with the AM2 masticator apparatus with normal and deficient programming...
January 23, 2018: Food & Function
Katalin Sas, Elza Szabó, László Vécsei
In this review, the potential causes of ageing are discussed. We seek to gain insight into the main physiological functions of mitochondria and discuss alterations in their function and the genome, which are supposed to be the central mechanisms in senescence. We conclude by presenting the potential modulating role of the kynurenine pathway in the ageing processes. Mitochondrial dynamics are supposed to have important physiological roles in maintaining cell homeostasis. During ageing, a decrease in mitochondrial dynamics was reported, potentially compromising the function of mitochondria...
January 17, 2018: Molecules: a Journal of Synthetic Chemistry and Natural Product Chemistry
Arkadiusz Urbański, Jan Lubawy, Paweł Marciniak, Grzegorz Rosiński
Burying beetles (Nicrophorus sp.) are necrophagous insects with developed parental care. Genome of Nicrophorus vespilloides has been recently sequenced, which makes them interesting model organism in behavioural ecology. However, we know very little about their physiology, including the functioning of their neuro-endocrine system. In this study, one of the physiological activities of proctolin, myosuppressin (Nicve-MS), myoinhibitory peptide (Trica-MIP-5) and the short neuropeptide F (Nicve-sNPF) in N. vespilloides have been investigated...
January 15, 2018: Insect Science
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