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neuro physiology

Ewa Szwejser, B M Lidy Verburg-van Kemenade, Magdalena Maciuszek, Magdalena Chadzinska
Clinical and experimental evidence shows that estrogens affect immunity in mammals. Less is known about this interaction in the evolutionary older, non-mammalian, vertebrates. Fish form an excellent model to identify evolutionary conserved neuroendocrine-immune interactions: i) they are the earliest vertebrates with fully developed innate and adaptive immunity, ii) immune and endocrine parameters vary with season iii) physiology is constantly disrupted by increasing contamination of the aquatic environment...
October 16, 2016: Hormones and Behavior
R S G M Perez
Pain is a complex neuro-physiological phenomenon affecting mind and behaviour, and is in turn also affected by psyche and behaviour. Differences among individuals in modulation, interpretation and expression complicate the comparison of pain between patients. Pain is a subjective experience and can be expressed by the patient in many different ways. In addition, influential factors from a bio-psycho-social perspective have to be taken into consideration: the interaction among somatic, psychological and social factors determines the ultimate pain experience and pain behaviour...
October 2016: Nederlands Tijdschrift Voor Tandheelkunde
J Stephen Huff, Everett W Austin
Understanding the anatomy and physiology of the eye, the orbit, and the central connections is key to understanding neuro-ophthalmologic emergencies. Anisocoria is an important sign that requires a systematic approach to avoid misdiagnosis of serious conditions, including carotid dissection (miosis) and aneurysmal third nerve palsy (mydriasis). Ptosis may be a sign of either Horner syndrome or third nerve palsy. An explanation should be pursued for diplopia since the differential diagnosis ranges from the trivial to life-threatening causes...
November 2016: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Calum Munro, Louise Randell, Stephen M Lawrie
: The need for novel approaches to understanding and treating anorexia nervosa (AN) is well recognized. The aim of this paper is to describe an integrative bio-psycho-social theory of maintaining factors in AN. We took a triangulation approach to develop a clinically relevant theory with face validity and internal consistency. We developed theoretical ideas from our clinical practice and reviewed theoretical ideas within the eating disorders and wider bio-psycho-social literature. The synthesis of these ideas and concepts into a clinically meaningful framework is described here...
October 13, 2016: Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy
Habiba Aurang Zeb, Ishaq Nasib Khan, Iqbal Munir, Wafaa Saadeldin Ramadan, Mian Afaq Ahmad, Deema Hussein, Mohammad Amjad Kamal, Saleh Al Karim
Injuries to the spinal cord often have devastating physiological impacts due to the organ's vital role in neuro-impulse communications between muscles and the brain. Spinal Cord Injuries (SCIs) have recently been estimated to affect up to 80,000 individuals per year worldwide, with most occurring following a traumatic event. Unfortunately, effective treatments standardised globally for patients with SCIs have not yet been established. For many years, inadequate understanding of the complexities of the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems and Neurogenesis has limited progression towards effective cures...
October 4, 2016: CNS & Neurological Disorders Drug Targets
Tando Maduna, Vincent Lelievre
Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) are neuropeptides with wide, complementary, and overlapping distributions in the central and peripheral nervous systems, where they exert important regulatory roles in many physiological processes. VIP and PACAP display a large range of biological cellular targets and functions in the adult nervous system including regulation of neurotransmission and neuroendocrine secretion and neuroprotective and neuroimmune responses...
December 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Research
Wei Chen, Xiayu Xia, Nan Song, Ying Wang, Hua Zhu, Wei Deng, Qi Kong, Xianmin Pan, Chuan Qin
BACKGROUND: Mouse has been extensively used as a tool for investigating the onset and development of human neurological disorders. As a first step to construct a transgenic mouse model of human brain lesions, it is of fundamental importance to clarify the similarity and divergence of genetic background between non-diseased human and mouse brain tissues. METHODS: We systematically compared, based on large scale integrated microarray data, the transcriptomes of three anatomically distinct brain regions; prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (HIP) and striatum (STR), across human and mouse...
2016: PloS One
Kristien A Van Camp, Geert Baggerman, Ronny Blust, Steven J Husson
: (Neuro)peptides are small messenger molecules that are derived from larger, inactive precursor proteins by the highly controlled action of processing enzymes. These biologically active peptides can be found in all metazoan species where they orchestrate a wide variety of physiological processes. Obviously, detailed knowledge on the actual peptide sequences, including the potential existence of truncated versions or presence of post-translation modifications, is of high importance when studying their function...
October 2, 2016: Journal of Proteomics
Patrick Kanju, Wolfgang Liedtke
TRPV4 ion channels are osmo-mechano-TRP channels with pleiotropic function and expression in many different types of tissues and cells. They have also been found involved in pain and inflammation. Studies have focused on the role of TRPV4 in peripheral sensory neurons, but its expression and function in central nervous glial cells and neurons has also been documented. In this overview, based on the senior author's lecture at the recent physiology meeting in Dublin, we concisely review evidence of TRPV4 expression and function in the CNS, and how TRPV4 function can be modulated for therapeutic benefit of neuro-psychiatric disorders...
October 4, 2016: Experimental Physiology
Mark John Hackett, Phyllis G Paterson, Ingrid J Pickering, Graham N George
A method to image taurine distributions within the central nervous system and other organs has long been sought. Since taurine is small and mobile, it cannot be chemically "tagged" and imaged using conventional immuno-histochemistry methods. Combining numerous indirect measurements, taurine is known to play critical roles in brain function during health and disease, and is proposed to act as a neuro-osmolyte, neuro-modulator and possibly a neuro-transmitter. Elucidation of taurine's neurochemical roles and importance would be substantially enhanced by a direct method to visualize alterations, due to physiological and pathological events in the brain, in the local concentration of taurine at or near cellular spatial resolution in vivo, or in situ in tissue sections...
October 4, 2016: Analytical Chemistry
Simona Ferrante, Noelia Chia Bejarano, Emilia Ambrosini, Antonio Nardone, Anna M Turcato, Marco Monticone, Giancarlo Ferrigno, Alessandra Pedrocchi
It has been largely suggested in neuroscience literature that to generate a vast variety of movements, the Central Nervous System (CNS) recruits a reduced set of coordinated patterns of muscle activities, defined as muscle synergies. Recent neurophysiological studies have recommended the analysis of muscle synergies to finely assess the patient's impairment, to design personalized interventions based on the specific nature of the impairment, and to evaluate the treatment outcomes. In this scope, the aim of this study was to design a personalized multi-channel functional electrical stimulation (FES) controller for gait training, integrating three novel aspects: (1) the FES strategy was based on healthy muscle synergies in order to mimic the neural solutions adopted by the CNS to generate locomotion; (2) the FES strategy was personalized according to an initial locomotion assessment of the patient and was designed to specifically activate the impaired biomechanical functions; (3) the FES strategy was mapped accurately on the altered gait kinematics providing a maximal synchronization between patient's volitional gait and stimulation patterns...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
Edson Filho, Maurizio Bertollo, Gabriella Tamburro, Lorenzo Schinaia, Jonas Chatel-Goldman, Selenia di Fronso, Claudio Robazza, Silvia Comani
BACKGROUND: Research on cooperative behavior and the social brain exists, but little research has focused on real-time motor cooperative behavior and its neural correlates. In this proof of concept study, we explored the conceptual notion of shared and complementary mental models through EEG mapping of two brains performing a real-world interactive motor task of increasing difficulty. We used the recently introduced participative "juggling paradigm," and collected neuro-physiological and psycho-social data...
2016: PeerJ
Han-Kyu Lee, Clara Velazquez Sanchez, Mei Chen, Peter J Morin, John M Wells, Eugene B Hanlon, Weiming Xia
The testing of candidate drugs to slow progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD) requires clinical trials that are lengthy and expensive. Efforts to model the biochemical milieu of the AD brain may be greatly facilitated by combining two cutting edge technologies to generate three-dimensional (3D) human neuro-spheroid from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) derived from AD subjects. We created iPSC from blood cells of five AD patients and differentiated them into 3D human neuronal culture. We characterized neuronal markers of our 3D neurons by immunocytochemical staining to validate the differentiation status...
2016: PloS One
Ishfaq Ali, Shobha Bhargava
Neuropeptide Y (NPY) has emerged as a novel peptide to antagonize various physiological consequences of stress within a mammalian brain. Hypoxia induced neuropeptide Y release in mammalian systems is well established. However, the possible role of NPY in regulating the effects of oxygen variation in lower vertebrates has not been investigated. We have studied the distribution and neuro-anatomical expression of NPY in the brain of Euphlyctus cyanophlyctus tadpoles, exposed to normal and reduced oxygen levels using immunohistochemistry...
September 20, 2016: General and Comparative Endocrinology
Angela Coppola, Vincenzo Tramontano, Federica Basaldella, Chiara Arcaro, Giovanna Squintani, Francesco Sala
INTRODUCTION: Over the past decade, the reluctance to operate in eloquent brain areas has been reconsidered in the light of the advent of new peri-operative functional neuroimaging techniques and new evidence from neuro-oncology. To maximise tumour resection while minimising morbidity should be the goal of brain surgery in children as much as it is in adults, and preservation of brain functions is critical in the light of the increased survival and the expectations in terms of quality of life...
October 2016: Child's Nervous System: ChNS: Official Journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
Antonella Castellano, Andrea Falini
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely employed in the diagnosis and clinical management of brain tumors. This review provides an overview of the advancements in the field of MRI, with a particular focus on the quantitative assessment by advanced physiological magnetic resonance techniques in light of the new molecular classification of brain tumor. RECENT FINDINGS: Understanding how molecular phenotypes of brain tumors are reflected in noninvasive imaging is the goal of radiogenomics, which aims at determining the association between imaging features and molecular markers in neuro-oncology...
November 2016: Current Opinion in Oncology
Louis Gagnon, Amy F Smith, David A Boas, Anna Devor, Timothy W Secomb, Sava Sakadžić
Oxygen is delivered to brain tissue by a dense network of microvessels, which actively control cerebral blood flow (CBF) through vasodilation and contraction in response to changing levels of neural activity. Understanding these network-level processes is immediately relevant for (1) interpretation of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) signals, and (2) investigation of neurological diseases in which a deterioration of neurovascular and neuro-metabolic physiology contributes to motor and cognitive decline...
2016: Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience
Juliane Wolter, Lorenz Schild, Fabian Bock, Andrea Hellwig, Ihsan Gadi, Moh D Mohanad Al-Dabet, Satish Ranjan, Raik Rönicke, Peter P Nawroth, Karl-Uwe Petersen, Christian Mawrin, Khurrum Shahzad, Berend Isermann
BACKGROUND: Studies with human samples and in rodents established a function of coagulation proteases in neuro-inflammatory demyelinating diseases, e.g. in multiple sclerosis (MS) and experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE). Surprisingly, approaches to increase aPC plasma levels as well as antibody mediated inhibition of PC/aPC ameliorated EAE in mice. Hence, the role of aPC generation in demyelinating diseases and potential mechanisms involved remain controversial. Furthermore, it is not known whether loss of aPC has pathological consequences at baseline, e...
September 3, 2016: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis: JTH
Raili Riikonen
There are no treatments for the core symptoms of autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), but there is now more knowledge on emerging mechanisms and on mechanism-based therapies. In autism there are altered synapses: genes affected are commonly related to synaptic and immune function. Dysregulation of activity-dependent signaling networks may have a key role the etiology of autism. There is an over-activation of IGF-AKT-mTor in autism spectrum disorders. Morphological and electro-physiological defects of the cerebellum are linked to system-wide ASD-like behavior defects...
November 2016: European Journal of Paediatric Neurology: EJPN
Tiziana Persichini, Sofia Mariotto, Hisanori Suzuki, Elena Butturini, Roberta Mastrantonio, Orazio Cantoni, Marco Colasanti
Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is expressed in several cell types, particularly in inflammatory cells, in response to diverse pro-inflammatory stimuli, including viral proteins as HIV tat and gp120. This response is preceded by an early decline in basal nitric oxide (NO) levels, dependent on a signaling leading to inhibition of the constitutive isoform of NO synthase (cNOS). This process requires critical levels of arachidonic acid (AA), generated by Ca2+-dependent activation of cytosolic phospholipase A2, and is mediated by the downstream tyrosine kinase-dependent phosphorylation of cNOS...
August 9, 2016: Current Medicinal Chemistry
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