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Michael A Stevenson
Vaccines were once produced almost exclusively by state-supported entities. While they remain essential tools for public health protection, the majority of the world's governments have allowed industry to assume responsibility for this function. This is significant because while the international harmonisation of quality assurance standards have effectively increased vaccine safety, they have also reduced the number of developing country vaccine producers, and Northern multinational pharmaceutical companies have shown little interest in offering the range of low-priced products needed in low and middle-income-country contexts...
October 19, 2016: Global Public Health
A Cherkaoui, S M Diene, A Renzoni, S Emonet, G Renzi, P François, J Schrenzel
OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present work was to investigate the potential roles of PBPs, efflux pumps, and slow drug influx for imipenem heteroresistance in nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). METHODS: The 59 NTHi clinical isolates examined in this study were collected at Geneva University Hospitals between 2009 and 2014. Alterations in PBPs were investigated by gene sequencing. To evaluate the affinities of the PBPs to imipenem, steady-state concentration-response experiments were carried out using imipenem in a competition assay with Bocillin-FL...
October 15, 2016: Clinical Microbiology and Infection
Katja Knauer
BACKGROUND: Chemical analysis of surface water conducted in European countries indicates that pesticides are often detected in surface waters. This asks regulatory authorities to consider these monitoring data while re-evaluating pesticide approval and setting appropriate risk mitigation measures. During the years 2005-2012, the cantons in Switzerland performed 345,000 pesticide measurements in surface waters. Overall, 203 approved pesticides were examined. For 60 of these substances, regulatory acceptable concentrations (RACs) were published, which were determined from ecotoxicological data in accordance with international test methods within the framework of the authorization procedure...
2016: Environmental Sciences Europe
Heather Carter-Templeton, Leslie H Nicoll
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Computers, Informatics, Nursing: CIN
D O Andrey, P François, C Manzano, E J Bonetti, S Harbarth, J Schrenzel, W L Kelley, A Renzoni
Ceftaroline is a broad-spectrum antibiotic with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Ceftaroline susceptibility of an MRSA set archived between 1994 and 2003 in the Geneva University Hospitals detected a high percentage (66 %) of ceftaroline resistance in clonotypes ST228 and ST247 and correlated with mutations in PBP2a. The ceftaroline mechanism of action is based on the inhibition of PBP2a; thus, the identification of PBP2a mutations of recently circulating clonotypes in our institution was investigated...
October 15, 2016: European Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases
Ephanielle Verbanis, Anthony Martin, Raphaël Houlmann, Gianluca Boso, Félix Bussières, Hugo Zbinden
Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which a party wishes to commit a secret bit to another party. Perfect security between mistrustful parties is unfortunately impossible to achieve through the asynchronous exchange of classical and quantum messages. Perfect security can nonetheless be achieved if each party splits into two agents exchanging classical information at times and locations satisfying strict relativistic constraints. A relativistic multiround protocol to achieve this was previously proposed and used to implement a 2-millisecond commitment time...
September 30, 2016: Physical Review Letters
Arnold L Demain, Evan Martens
We are pleased to dedicate this paper to Dr Julian E Davies. Julian is a giant among microbial biochemists. He began his professional career as an organic chemistry PhD student at Nottingham University, moved on to a postdoctoral fellowship at Columbia University, then became a lecturer at the University of Manchester, followed by a fellowship in microbial biochemistry at Harvard Medical School. In 1965, he studied genetics at the Pasteur Institute, and 2 years later joined the University of Wisconsin in the Department of Biochemistry...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Antibiotics
Douglas E Berg
This paper recounts some of my fond memories of a collaboration between Julian Davies and myself that started in 1974 in Geneva and that led to our serendipitous discovery of the bacterial kanamycin resistance transposon Tn5, and aspects of the lasting positive impact of our interaction and discovery on me and the community. Tn5 was one of the first antibiotic resistance transposons to be found. Its analysis over the ensuing decades provided valuable insights into mechanisms and control of transposition, and led to its use as a much-valued tool in diverse areas of molecular genetics, as also will be discussed here...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Antibiotics
Paul Sebo, François R Herrmann, Dagmar M Haller
BACKGROUND: No study has assessed the association between patients' and doctors' gender and patient satisfaction with organizational aspects of health care in primary care. However, just like satisfaction regarding communication styles or technical skills, satisfaction towards organization of the general practitioner (GP) practice could also depend on doctors' and/or patients' gender. Different expectations between female and male patients regarding the organization of the practice or different ways of organizing care delivery between female and male GPs could act on this satisfaction...
August 27, 2016: BMC Family Practice
Jonathan Dash, Dagmar M Haller, Johanna Sommer, Noelle Junod Perron
BACKGROUND: Physicians' daily work is increasingly affected by the use of emails, text messages and cell phone calls with their patients. The aim of this study was to describe their use between primary-care physicians and patients in a French-speaking part of Switzerland. METHODS: A cross-sectional mail survey was conducted among all primary-care physicians of Geneva canton (n = 636). The questionnaire focused on the frequency of giving access to, type of use, advantages and disadvantages of email, cell phone calls and text messages communication between physicians and patients...
October 5, 2016: BMC Health Services Research
Yves Jackson, Juan Carlos Lozano Becerra, Marc Carpentier
BACKGROUND: Socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with an increased risk of adverse diabetes outcomes. In Switzerland, a country with theoretical universal healthcare coverage, people without health insurance face barriers in accessing to and in receiving standard quality care. The Geneva University Hospitals (HUG) have implemented policies aiming at reducing these gaps. We compared quality of diabetes care and ambulatory healthcare services utilization among insured and uninsured diabetic patients...
October 3, 2016: BMC Health Services Research
Elizabeth Fee, Marcu Cueto, Theodore M Brown
The World Health Organization's (WHO's) leadership challenges can be traced to its first decades of existence. Central to its governance and practice is regionalization: the division of its member countries into regions, each representing 1 geographical or cultural area. The particular composition of each region has varied over time-reflecting political divisions and especially decolonization. Currently, the 194 member countries belong to 6 regions: the Americas (35 countries), Europe (53 countries), the Eastern Mediterranean (21 countries), South-East Asia (11 countries), the Western Pacific (27 countries), and Africa (47 countries)...
November 2016: American Journal of Public Health
Eduardo Pinheiro Domingues, Rafael Fernandes Ribeiro, Martinho Campolina Rebello Horta, Flávio Ricardo Manzi, Maurício Greco Côsso, Elton Gonçalves Zenóbio
OBJECTIVE: Using computed tomography, to compare vertical and volumetric bone augmentation after interposition grafting with bovine bone mineral matrix (GEISTLICH BIO-OSS(®) ) or hydroxyapatite/tricalcium phosphate (STRAUMANN(®) BONECERAMIC) for atrophic posterior mandible reconstruction through segmental osteotomy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Seven patients received interposition grafts in the posterior mandible for implant rehabilitation. The computed tomography cone beam images were analysed with OsiriX Imaging Software 6...
October 4, 2016: Clinical Oral Implants Research
A Martignier, M Pacton, M Filella, J-M Jaquet, F Barja, K Pollok, F Langenhorst, S Lavigne, P Guagliardo, M R Kilburn, C Thomas, R Martini, D Ariztegui
Until now, descriptions of intracellular biomineralization of amorphous inclusions involving alkaline-earth metal (AEM) carbonates other than calcium have been confined exclusively to cyanobacteria (Couradeau et al., 2012). Here, we report the first evidence of the presence of intracellular amorphous granules of AEM carbonates (calcium, strontium, and barium) in unicellular eukaryotes. These inclusions, which we have named micropearls, show concentric and oscillatory zoning on a nanometric scale. They are widespread in certain eukaryote phytoplankters of Lake Geneva (Switzerland) and represent a previously unknown type of non-skeletal biomineralization, revealing an unexpected pathway in the geochemical cycle of AEMs...
September 30, 2016: Geobiology
Neil D Graham, Damien Bouffard, Jean-Luc Loizeau
Understanding the dynamics and fate of particle bound contaminants is important for mitigating potential environmental, economic and health impacts linked to their presence. Vidy Bay, Lake Geneva (Switzerland), is contaminated due to the outfall and overflow from the wastewater treatment plant of the City of Lausanne. This study was designed to investigate the fate of particle-bound contaminants with the goal of providing a more complete picture of contaminant pathways within the bay and their potential spread to the main basin...
October 3, 2016: Environmental Science and Pollution Research International
William Chi Wai Wong, Sealing Cheng, Eleanor Holroyd, Julie Chen, Kelley Ann Loper, Lynn Tran, Heidi Yin Hai Miu
BACKGROUND: Hong Kong's resistance to be a signatory of the 1951 Geneva Convention and lack of domestic policies in this area has resulted in restrictions on access to healthcare amongst asylum seekers and refugees (ASRs). Using social determinants of health framework this study sought to identify health practices, problems and needs of African ASRs in Hong Kong. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey comprising of six domains including health status, health-seeking behaviour and social experience targeted at adult African ASRs in Hong Kong was conducted through three local non-governmental organisations between February and April 2013...
September 27, 2016: International Journal for Equity in Health
M Guevara Soto, B Vidondo, L Vaughan, J-F Rubin, H Segner, S Samartin, H Schmidt-Posthaus
Epitheliocystis in Swiss brown trout (Salmo trutta) is a chlamydial infection, mainly caused by Candidatus Piscichlamydia salmonis and Candidatus Clavichlamydia salmonicola. To gain a better understanding of the temporal development of infections in wild brown trout, we investigated epitheliocystis infections during the course of the summer and autumn months of a single year (2015), and compared this to sampling points over the span of the years 2012-2014. The survey focused on tributaries (Venoge and Boiron) of the Rhone flowing in to Lake Geneva...
September 27, 2016: Journal of Fish Diseases
Elena Gascón Díez, Jean-Luc Loizeau, Claudia Cosio, Sylvain Bouchet, Thierry Adatte, David Amouroux, Andrea G Bravo
As the methylation of inorganic mercury to neurotoxic methylmercury has been attributed to the activity of anaerobic bacteria, the formation of methylmercury in the oxic water column of marine ecosystems has puzzled scientists over the past years. Here we show for the first time that methylmercury can be produced in particles sinking through oxygenated water column of lakes. Total mercury and methylmercury concentrations were measured in the settling particles and in surface sediments of the largest freshwater lake in Western Europe (Lake Geneva)...
October 13, 2016: Environmental Science & Technology
Anson E Long, Elizabeth C Pinel, Geneva C Yawger
Ingroup favoritism is pervasive. It emerges even in the minimal group paradigm, where participants are assigned to novel groups based on seemingly insignificant characteristics. Yet many of the grouping schemes used in minimal group research may imply something significant: namely, that ingroup members will share in-the-moment subjective experience, or I-share. Two studies examine the role of inferred I-sharing in the minimal group paradigm. We found that (1) people inferred that they would I-share with ingroup members more than outgroup members; (2) inferred I-sharing increased ingroup favoritism; and (3) inferred I-sharing accounted for this ingroup favoritism...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Social Psychology
Emanuela Esposito, Michae Douek
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2016: Chinese Journal of Cancer Research, Chung-kuo Yen Cheng Yen Chiu
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