Read by QxMD icon Read

Hair cells cochlea

A R Fetoni, R Rolesi, F Paciello, S L M Eramo, C Grassi, D Troiani, G Paludetti
Experimental and human investigations have raised the level of concern about the potential ototoxicity of organic solvents and their interaction with noise. The main objective of this study was to characterize the effects of the combined noise and styrene exposure on hearing focusing on the mechanism of damage on the sensorineural cells and supporting cells of the organ of Corti and neurons of the ganglion of Corti. The impact of single and combined exposures on hearing was evaluated by auditory functional testing and histological analyses of cochlear specimens...
October 18, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Qiuhong Xue, Caihong Li, Jia Chen, Hongmei Guo, Dongqing Li, Xianglei Wu
CONTEXT: The audiological features and cochlear morphology of individuals with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) are well characterized. However, the molecular processes in the cochlea are not well understood. AIMS: To explore the role of the endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) response in the guinea pig model of cochlear damage induced by exposure to intense noise. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: A pilot case-control study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Forty-eight guinea pigs were divided into four equal groups...
September 2016: Noise & Health
Kaidi D Zhang, Thomas M Coate
In hearing, mechanically sensitive hair cells (HCs) in the cochlea release glutamate onto spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) to relay auditory information to the central nervous system (CNS). There are two main SGN subtypes, which differ in morphology, number, synaptic targets, innervation patterns and firing properties. About 90-95% of SGNs are the type I SGNs, which make a single bouton connection with inner hair cells (IHCs) and have been well described in the canonical auditory pathway for sound detection. However, less attention has been given to the type II SGNs, which exclusively innervate outer hair cells (OHCs)...
October 16, 2016: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
Wei Dong, Elizabeth S Olson
Cochlear frequency tuning is based on a mildly tuned traveling-wave response that is enhanced in amplitude and sharpness by outer hair cell (OHC)-based forces. The nonlinear and active character of this enhancement is the fundamental manifestation of cochlear amplification. Recently, mechanical (pressure) and electrical (extracellular OHC-generated voltage) responses were simultaneously measured close to the sensory tissue's basilar membrane. Both pressure and voltage were tuned and showed traveling-wave phase accumulation, evidence that they were locally generated responses...
October 18, 2016: Biophysical Journal
Nathaniel T Greene, Jameson K Mattingly, Renee M Banakis Hartl, Daniel J Tollin, Stephen P Cass
HYPOTHESIS: Cochlear implant (CI) electrode insertion into the round window induces pressure transients in the cochlear fluid comparable to high-intensity sound transients. BACKGROUND: Many patients receiving a CI have some remaining functional hearing at low frequencies; thus, devices and surgical techniques have been developed to use this residual hearing. To maintain functional acoustic hearing, it is important to retain function of any hair cells and auditory nerve fibers innervating the basilar membrane; however, in a subset of patients, residual low-frequency hearing is lost after CI insertion...
October 5, 2016: Otology & Neurotology
William C Scott, Christopher K Giardina, Andrew K Pappa, Tatyana E Fontenot, Meredith L Anderson, Margaret T Dillon, Kevin D Brown, Harold C Pillsbury, Oliver F Adunka, Craig A Buchman, Douglas C Fitzpatrick
HYPOTHESIS: The compound action potential (CAP) is a purely neural component of the cochlea's response to sound, and may provide information regarding the existing neural substrate in cochlear implant (CI) subjects that can help account for variance in speech perception outcomes. BACKGROUND: Measurement of the "total response" (TR), or sum of the magnitudes of spectral components in the ongoing responses to tone bursts across frequencies, has been shown to account for 40 to 50% of variance in speech perception outcomes...
October 4, 2016: Otology & Neurotology
M Müller, M Tisch, H Maier, H Löwenheim
BACKGROUND: High-intensity noise exposure from impulse and blast noise events often leads to acute hearing loss and may cause irreversible permanent hearing loss as a long-term consequence. Here, a treatment regime was developed to limit permanent damage based on a preclinical animal model of acute noise trauma. AIM: To develop clinical trials for the treatment of acute noise traumas using approved drugs. The otoprotective potential of glucocorticoids applied locally to the inner ear was examined...
October 14, 2016: HNO
Sedat Doğan, Hasmet Yazici, Esin Yalçinkaya, Halil Ibrahim Erdoğdu, Sibel Alicura Tokgöz, Furkan Sarici, Mehmet Namuslu, Yasin Sarikaya
Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of several types of malignant solid tumors but its clinical use is associated with ototoxicity. In the present study, we investigated the effect of selenium administration on lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde [MDA]) and cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in rats. Healthy wistar albino rats (n = 21) were randomly divided into 3 groups: control (C), cisplatin (Cis), cisplatin and selenium (Cis+Se). Cisplatin was administered for 3 days to Cis and Cis+Se groups...
October 2016: Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
Yoshinobu Hirose, Kazuma Sugahara, Eiju Kanagawa, Yousuke Takemoto, Makoto Hashimoto, Hiroshi Yamashita
Eighteen supplement drugs were screened using hair cells to determine a protective effect against the adverse effects of neomycin by using the zebrafish lateral line. The zebrafish were administered the supplement drugs 1 h before neomycin exposure. One hour later, animals were fixed in paraformaldehyde. Dose-response curves were generated to evaluate the protective effect on hair cells. The screen identified 3 supplements (quercetin, catechin and tannic acid). Three minutes after exposure to neomycin, increased antioxidant activity was found in the lateral line hair cells, as determined by the analysis of oxidative stress...
October 4, 2016: Hearing Research
Rahul Mittal, Mayank Aranke, Luca H Debs, Desiree Nguyen, Amit P Patel, M'hamed Grati, Jeenu Mittal, Denise Yan, Prem Chapagain, Adrien A Eshraghi, Xue Zhong Liu
Ear is a complex system where appropriate ionic composition is essential for maintaining the tissue homeostasis and hearing function. Ion transporters and channels present in the auditory system plays a crucial role in maintaining proper ionic composition in the ear. The extracellular fluid, called endolymph, found in the cochlea of the mammalian inner ear is particularly unique due to its electrochemical properties. At an endocochlear potential of about +80 mV, signaling initiated by acoustic stimuli at the level of the hair cells is dependent on the unusually high potassium (K(+) ) concentration of endolymph...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Cellular Physiology
Aaron K Remenschneider, Robert Gaudin, Elliott D Kozin, Reuven Ishai, Olivia Quatela, Tessa A Hadlock, Michael J McKenna
OBJECTIVES: Facial nerve schwannomas (FNSs) and vestibular nerve schwannomas (VNSs) may occupy similar locations in the internal auditory canal (IAC). Risk factors for hearing loss in patients with FNS are unknown. Similar to VNSs, we hypothesize that the size and location of FNSs do not correlate with hearing loss. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study and otopathology case review. METHODS: A single institution retrospective review of all patients diagnosed with FNS was performed...
October 4, 2016: Laryngoscope
Pankhuri Vyas, Jingjing Sherry Wu, Amanda Zimmerman, Paul Fuchs, Elisabeth Glowatzki
Acoustic information propagates from the ear to the brain via spiral ganglion neurons that innervate hair cells in the cochlea. These afferents include unmyelinated type II fibers that constitute 5 % of the total, the majority being myelinated type I neurons. Lack of specific genetic markers of type II afferents in the cochlea has been a roadblock in studying their functional role. Unexpectedly, type II afferents were visualized by reporter proteins induced by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-driven Cre recombinase...
September 30, 2016: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
Mo Chen, Qin Wang, Gang-Hua Zhu, Peng Hu, Yuan Zhou, Tian Wang, Ruo-Sha Lai, Zi-An Xiao, Ding-Hua Xie
The TPRN gene encodes taperin, which is prominently present at the taper region of hair cell stereocilia. Mutations in TPRN have been reported to cause autosomal recessive nonsyndromic deafness 79(DFNB 79). To investigate the role of taperin in pathogenesis of hearing loss, we generated TPRN knockout mice using TALEN technique. Sanger sequencing confirmed an 11 bp deletion at nucleotide 177-187 in exon 1 of TPRN, which results in a truncated form of taperin protein. Heterozygous TPRN(+/-) mice showed apparently normal auditory phenotypes to their wide-type (WT) littermates...
October 28, 2016: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
G M Strain, A J Rosado Martinez, K A McGee, C L McMillan
Recordings of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) were taken from 28 geriatric dogs aged 12.2 ± 2.2 years and 15 control dogs aged 5.9 ± 3.0 years (mean ± standard deviation) to demonstrate frequency-specific changes in cochlear responses. Recordings were performed for primary frequencies of 2-12 kHz in 2 kHz increments. Brainstem auditory evoked response (BAER) recordings were also made from geriatric dogs for comparison with DPOAE responses. Significant decreases in DPOAE response amplitudes were observed at frequencies of 6-12 kHz in geriatric dogs compared to control dogs, reflecting loss of cochlear outer hair cells along the length of the cochlea...
October 2016: Veterinary Journal
Daniil Frolov, Geng-Lin Li
Most, if not all, modern vertebrate species have evolved exquisite inner ears to discriminate acoustic signals of different frequencies, through a process called frequency tuning. For non-mammalian species, at least part of frequency tuning has been attributed to intrinsic electrical properties of hair cells, i.e. electrical tuning. Since it was first discovered, the traditional method to assess electrical tuning has been to inject step current into hair cells and examine dampened membrane voltage oscillation...
September 29, 2016: Synapse
Min Young Lee, Seung-Hyun Bae, So-Young Chang, Jae-Hun Lee, Se-Hyung Kim, Jin-Chul Ahn, Phil-Sang Chung, Wesley Moy, Jae Yun Jung
Auditory neuropathy is a hearing disorder caused by impaired auditory nerve function. The lack of information about the pathophysiology of this disease limits early diagnosis and further treatment. Laser therapy is a novel approach to enhance nerve growth or induce axonal regeneration. We induced auditory neural degeneration sparing the sensory epithelium with local ouabain application in an animal model and observed the rescue effect of photobiomodulation (PBM), showing recovered auditory function and favorable histologic outcome...
October 28, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
B B Xie, H W Li, C F Dai
Objective: To identify the targets of the infrared laser stimulating on the cochlea of guinea pig which evoked auditory brainstem response (oABR), and explore the mechanisms of the infrared neurostimulation. Methods: A polished optical fiber with 200 μm diameter (NA=0.22) was planted into the scala tympani of guinea pigs to stimulate the cochlea of both the normal hearing and acute deafened guinea pigs. The direction of the fiber distal was changed to radiate different regions of the scala tympani, recording the oABR respectively...
September 7, 2016: Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke za Zhi, Chinese Journal of Otorhinolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery
Basile Tarchini, Abigail L D Tadenev, Nicholas Devanney, Michel Cayouette
Sensory perception in the inner ear relies on the hair bundle, the highly polarized brush of movement detectors crowning hair cells. We previously showed that, in the mouse cochlea, the edge of the forming bundle is defined by the 'bare zone', a microvilli-free sub-region of apical membrane specified by the mInsc-LGN-Gαi protein complex. We now report that LGN and Gαi also occupy the very tip of stereocilia that directly abut the bare zone. We demonstrate that LGN and Gαi are both essential to promote the elongation and differential identity of stereocilia across rows...
September 22, 2016: Development
Tobias Moser, Christian Vogl
The inner ear uses specialized synapses to indefatigably transmit sound information from hair cells to spiral ganglion neurons at high rates with submillisecond precision. The emerging view is that hair cell synapses achieve their demanding function by employing an unconventional presynaptic molecular composition. Hair cell active zones hold the synaptic ribbon, an electron-dense projection made primarily of RIBEYE, which tethers a halo of synaptic vesicles and is thought to enable a large readily releasable pool of vesicles and to contribute to its rapid replenishment...
2016: F1000Research
Hiroko Torii, Atsuhiro Yoshida, Tatsuya Katsuno, Takayuki Nakagawa, Juichi Ito, Koichi Omori, Makoto Kinoshita, Norio Yamamoto
Septins are guanosine triphosphate-binding proteins that are evolutionally conserved in all eukaryotes other than plants. They function as multimeric complexes that interact with membrane lipids, actomyosin, and microtubules. Based on these interactions, septins play essential roles in the morphogenesis and physiological functions of many mammalian cell types including the regulation of microtubule stability, vesicle trafficking, cortical rigidity, planar cell polarity, and apoptosis. The inner ear, which perceives auditory and equilibrium sensation with highly differentiated hair cells, has a complicated gross morphology...
September 12, 2016: Developmental Biology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"