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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28098771/breast-cancer-brain-metastases-clonal-evolution-in-clinical-context
#1
REVIEW
Jodi M Saunus, Amy E McCart Reed, Zhun Leong Lim, Sunil R Lakhani
Brain metastases are highly-evolved manifestations of breast cancer arising in a unique microenvironment, giving them exceptional adaptability in the face of new extrinsic pressures. The incidence is rising in line with population ageing, and use of newer therapies that stabilise metastatic disease burden with variable efficacy throughout the body. Historically, there has been a widely-held view that brain metastases do not respond to circulating therapeutics because the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) restricts their uptake...
January 13, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28098709/multimodal-imaging-during-the-evolution-of-blood-brain-barrier-disruption-maculopathy
#2
Bikramjit P Pal, Tapani Palosaari, Tero Kivelä
PURPOSE: To highlight the course of blood-brain barrier disruption maculopathy in a patient with successfully managed relapsed central nervous system lymphoma. METHODS: Case report with fundus autofluorescence and optical coherence tomography imaging, and literature review. RESULTS: A 57-year-old patient diagnosed with central nervous system large B-cell lymphoma had a normal ophthalmic evaluation on his first visit. Subsequently, when his malignancy recurred locally, he was started on blood-brain barrier disruption therapy and intraarterial methotrexate...
January 16, 2017: Retinal Cases & Brief Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28095378/advanced-neuroimaging-techniques-in-pediatric-hydrocephalus
#3
Smruti K Patel, Weihong Yuan, Francesco T Mangano
From the early days of pneumoencephalography and ventriculography to the emerging technology of magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of the present day, neuroimaging has always been a critical tool in the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric hydrocephalus. There is accumulating evidence from both human and animal research suggesting that one of the major pathophysiological mechanisms underlying poor outcomes in these children is damage to vulnerable white matter (WM) structures in the brain as a result of ventricular enlargement and increased intracranial pressure...
January 18, 2017: Pediatric Neurosurgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092905/endocranial-morphology-of-the-extinct-north-american-lion-panthera-atrox
#4
Andrew R Cuff, Christopher Stockey, Anjali Goswami
The extinct North American lion (Panthera atrox) is one of the largest felids (Mammalia, Carnivora) to have ever lived, and it is known from a plethora of incredibly well-preserved remains. Despite this abundance of material, there has been little research into its endocranial anatomy. CT scans of a skull of P. atrox from the Pleistocene La Brea Tar pits were used to generate the first virtual endocranium for this species and to elucidate previously unknown details of its brain size and gross structure, cranial nerves, and inner-ear morphology...
January 17, 2017: Brain, Behavior and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28091543/fluctuations-in-evolutionary-integration-allow-for-big-brains-and-disparate-faces
#5
Kory M Evans, Brandon T Waltz, Victor A Tagliacollo, Brian L Sidlauskas, James S Albert
In theory, evolutionary modularity allows anatomical structures to respond differently to selective regimes, thus promoting morphological diversification. These differences can then influence the rate and direction of phenotypic evolution among structures. Here we use geometric morphometrics and phenotypic matrix statistics to compare rates of craniofacial evolution and estimate evolvability in the face and braincase modules of a clade of teleost fishes (Gymnotiformes) and a clade of mammals (Carnivora), both of which exhibit substantial craniofacial diversity...
January 16, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089577/neutralizing-anti-interleukin-1%C3%AE-antibodies-reduce-ischemia-related-interleukin-1%C3%AE-transport-across-the-blood-brain-barrier-in-fetal-sheep
#6
Aparna Patra, Xiaodi Chen, Grazyna B Sadowska, Jiyong Zhang, Yow-Pin Lim, James F Padbury, William A Banks, Barbara S Stonestreet
Hypoxic ischemic insults predispose to perinatal brain injury. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are important in the evolution of this injury. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a key mediator of inflammatory responses and elevated IL-1β levels in brain correlate with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes after brain injury. Impaired blood-brain barrier (BBB) function represents an important component of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the fetus. In addition, ischemia-reperfusion increases cytokine transport across the BBB of the ovine fetus...
January 9, 2017: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089368/the-transition-from-pediatric-to-adult-care-for-youth-with-epilepsy-basic-biological-sociological-and-psychological-issues
#7
REVIEW
Peter Camfield, Carol Camfield, Kanetee Busiah, David Cohen, Alison Pack, Rima Nabbout
Transition from pediatric to adult health care for adolescents with epilepsy is challenging for the patient, family, and health care workers. This paper is the first of three that summarize the main findings from the 2nd Symposium on Transition in Epilepsies, held in Paris from June 14-25, 2016. In this paper we describe five basic themes that have an important effect on transition. First, there are important brain changes in adolescence that leave an imbalance between risk taking and pleasure seeking behaviors and frontal executive function compared with adults...
January 12, 2017: Epilepsy & Behavior: E&B
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088503/evidence-for-splice-transcript-variants-of-tmem165-a-gene-involved-in-cdg
#8
Marie-Ange Krzewinski-Recchi, Sven Potelle, Anne Marie-Mir, Dorothée Vicogne, Eudoxie Dulary, Sandrine Duvet, Willy Morelle, Geoffroy de Bettignies, François Foulquier
BACKGROUND: Defects in TMEM165 gene cause a type-II Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation affecting Golgi glycosylation processes. TMEM165 patients exhibit psychomotor retardation, important osteoporosis, scoliosis, irregular epiphyses and thin bone cortex. Human TMEM165 protein is highly conserved in evolution and belongs to the family of UPF0016 membrane proteins which could be an unique group of Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporters regulating Ca(2+) and pH homeostasis and mainly localized in the Golgi apparatus...
January 11, 2017: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087772/possible-roles-of-new-mutations-shared-by-asian-and-american-zika-viruses
#9
Shozo Yokoyama, William T Starmer
Originating in Africa, the Zika virus (ZIKV) has spread to Asia, Pacific Islands and now to the Americas and beyond. Since the first isolation in 1947, ZIKV strains have been sampled at various times in the last 69 years, but this history has not been reflected in studying the patterns of mutation accumulation in their genomes. Implementing the viral history, we show that the ZIKV ancestor appeared sometime in 1930-1945 and, at that point, its mutation rate was probably less than 0.2 x 10(-3)/nucleotide site/year and subsequently increased significantly in most of its descendants...
January 12, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087242/brains-for-birds-and-babies-neural-parallels-between-birdsong-and-speech-acquisition
#10
REVIEW
Jonathan Prather, Kazuo Okanoya, Johan J Bolhuis
Language as a computational cognitive mechanism appears to be unique to the human species. However, there are remarkable behavioral similarities between song learning in songbirds and speech acquisition in human infants that are absent in non-human primates. Here we review important neural parallels between birdsong and speech. In both cases there are separate but continually interacting neural networks that underlie vocal production, sensorimotor learning, and auditory perception and memory. As in the case of human speech, neural activity related to birdsong learning is lateralized, and mirror neurons linking perception and performance may contribute to sensorimotor learning...
January 10, 2017: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28087076/polarization-of-microglia-and-its-role-in-bacterial-sepsis
#11
REVIEW
Monique Michels, Beatriz Sonai, Felipe Dal-Pizzol
Microglial polarization in response to brain inflammatory conditions is a crescent field in neuroscience. However, the effect of systemic inflammation, and specifically sepsis, is a relatively unexplored field that has great interest and relevance. Sepsis has been associated with both early and late harmful events of the central nervous system, suggesting that there is a close link between sepsis and neuroinflammation. During sepsis evolution it is supposed that microglial could exert both neurotoxic and repairing effects depending on the specific microglial phenotype assumed...
January 3, 2017: Journal of Neuroimmunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28086802/brain-metabolic-pattern-analysis-using-a-magnetic-resonance-spectra-classification-software-in-experimental-stroke
#12
Elena Jiménez-Xarrié, Myriam Davila, Ana Paula Candiota, Raquel Delgado-Mederos, Sandra Ortega-Martorell, Margarida Julià-Sapé, Carles Arús, Joan Martí-Fàbregas
BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides non-invasive information about the metabolic pattern of the brain parenchyma in vivo. The SpectraClassifier software performs MRS pattern-recognition by determining the spectral features (metabolites) which can be used objectively to classify spectra. Our aim was to develop an Infarct Evolution Classifier and a Brain Regions Classifier in a rat model of focal ischemic stroke using SpectraClassifier. RESULTS: A total of 164 single-voxel proton spectra obtained with a 7 Tesla magnet at an echo time of 12 ms from non-infarcted parenchyma, subventricular zones and infarcted parenchyma were analyzed with SpectraClassifier ( http://gabrmn...
January 13, 2017: BMC Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28078538/the-sleep-in-caenorhabditis-elegans-what-we-know-until-now
#13
REVIEW
Maryam Moosavi, Gholam Reza Hatam
Sleep, as one of the most important requirements of our brain, has a mystical nature. Despite long-standing studies, the molecular mechanisms and physiological properties of sleep have not been defined well as the complexity of the mammals' brain make it difficult to investigate the mechanisms and properties of sleep. Although some features of sleep have changed during evolution, its existence in such a simple animal, Caenorhabditis elegans, not only signifies the importance of sleep in even simple animals, but also allows the scientist to assess the core mechanism and biological events in an uncomplicated organism...
January 11, 2017: Molecular Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077771/the-correlated-evolution-of-antipredator-defences-and-brain-size-in-mammals
#14
Theodore Stankowich, Ashly N Romero
Mammals that possess elaborate antipredator defences such as body armour, spines and quills are usually well protected, intermediate in size, primarily insectivorous and live in simple open environments. The benefits of such defences seem clear and may relax selection on maintaining cognitive abilities that aid in vigilance and predator recognition, and their bearers may accrue extensive production and maintenance costs. Here, in this comparative phylogenetic analysis of measurements of encephalization quotient and morphological defence scores of 647 mammal species representing nearly every order, we found that as lineages evolve stronger defences, they suffer a correlated reduction in encephalization...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077388/the-na-taurocholate-cotransporting-polypeptide-ntcp-slc10a1-ortholog-in-the-marine-skate-leucoraja-erinacea-is-not-a-physiological-bile-salt-transporter
#15
Dongke Yu, Han Zhang, Daniel A Lionarons, James L Boyer, Shi-Ying Cai
The Na(+)-dependent taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP/SLC10A1) is a hepatocyte specific solute carrier, which plays an important role in maintaining bile salt homeostasis in mammals. The absence of an hepatic Na(+)-dependent bile salt transport system in marine skate and rainbow trout raises a question regarding the function of the Slc10a1 gene in these species. Here we have characterized the Slc10a1 gene in the marine skate, Leucoraja erinacea. The transcript of skate Slc10a1 (skSlc10a1) encodes 319 amino acids and shares 46% identity to human NTCP (hNTCP) with similar topology to mammalian NTCP...
January 11, 2017: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28075002/-why-do-we-call-the-brain-brain
#16
REVIEW
A Garcia-Molina, A Ensenat
INTRODUCTION: Every day millions of professionals use a countless number of technical words to refer to the different structures inside the skull. But few of them would know how to explain their origin. In this study we take an in-depth look into the etymological origins of some of these neuroanatomical terms. DEVELOPMENT: The study takes an etymological tour of the central nervous system. It is in no way meant to be an exhaustive, detailed review of the terms currently in use, but instead a means to familiarise the reader with the linguistic past of words like brain, hippocampus, thalamus, claustrum, fornix, corpus callosum or limbic system...
January 16, 2017: Revista de Neurologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068650/evolution-of-gyrification-in-carnivores
#17
George A Lyras, Aggeliki Giannakopoulou, Miranda Kouvari, Georgios C Papadopoulos
The order Carnivora is a large and highly diverse mammalian group with a long and well-documented evolutionary history. Nevertheless, our knowledge on the degree of cortical folding (or degree of gyrification) is limited to just a few species. Here we investigate the degree of cortical folding in 64 contemporary and 37 fossil carnivore species. We do so by measuring the length of gyri impressions on endocranial casts. We use this approach because we have found that there is a very good correlation between the degree of cortical folding and the relative length of the gyri that are exposed on the outer surface of the hemispheres...
January 10, 2017: Brain, Behavior and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28067897/pathological-changes-in-basement-membranes-and-dermal-connective-tissue-of-skin-from-patients-with-hereditary-cystatin-c-amyloid-angiopathy
#18
Asbjorg Osk Snorradottir, Helgi J Isaksson, Saevar Ingthorsson, Elias Olafsson, Astridur Palsdottir, Birkir Thor Bragason
Hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy (HCCAA) is a genetic disease caused by a mutation in the cystatin C gene. Cystatin C is abundant in cerebrospinal fluid and the most prominent pathology in HCCAA is cerebral amyloid angiopathy due to mutant cystatin C amyloid deposition with associated cerebral hemorrhages, typically in young adult carriers. Analyses of post-mortem brain samples shows that pathological changes are limited to arteries and regions adjacent to arteries. The severity of pathological changes at post-mortem has precluded the elucidation of the evolution of histological changes...
January 9, 2017: Laboratory Investigation; a Journal of Technical Methods and Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28065713/goldfish-hippocampal-pallium-is-essential-to-associate-temporally-discontiguous-events
#19
B Rodríguez-Expósito, A Gómez, I Martín-Monzón, M Reiriz, F Rodríguez, C Salas
There is general agreement that the hippocampus of vertebrates, from fish to mammals, is involved in map-like spatial memory. However, in mammals the role of the hippocampus goes beyond the spatial domain as it is also involved in binding the temporally separate events that compose episodic memories. In this regard, the hippocampus of mammals is essential for trace classical conditioning, in which a stimulus-free time gap separates the end of the conditioned stimulus (CS) and the unconditioned stimulus (US), but not in delay conditioning, in which both stimuli coincide in time...
January 5, 2017: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28061002/closed-form-expressions-for-flip-angle-variation-that-maximize-total-signal-in-t1-weighted-rapid-gradient-echo-mri
#20
Matthias Drobnitzky, Uwe Klose
PURPOSE: Magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MPRAGE) sequences are commonly employed for T1-weighted structural brain imaging. Following a contrast preparation radiofrequency (RF) pulse the data acquisition proceeds under non-equilibrium conditions of the relaxing longitudinal magnetization. Variation of the flip angle can be used to maximize total available signal. Simulated annealing or greedy algorithms have so far been published to numerically solve this problem, with signal to noise ratios optimized for clinical imaging scenarios by adhering to a predefined shape of the signal evolution...
January 6, 2017: Medical Physics
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