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motor cognitive outcome

Deok Su Sin, Myoung Hyoun Kim, Soon-Ah Park, Min Cheol Joo, Min Su Kim
Objective: The purpose of this study is to investigate predictors of crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD), and the effects of CCD on functional outcomes including motor function, activities of daily living, cognitive function, and ambulation 6 months after onset in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Methods: A total of 74 patients experiencing their first ICH were recruited. If the asymmetric index was more than 10% using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), a diagnosis of CCD was confirmed...
February 2018: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
Karuna Subramaniam, Hardik Kothare, Danielle Mizuiri, Srikantan S Nagarajan, John F Houde
Self-agency is the experience of being the agent of one's own thoughts and motor actions. The intact experience of self-agency is necessary for successful interactions with the outside world (i.e., reality monitoring) and for responding to sensory feedback of our motor actions (e.g., speech feedback control). Reality monitoring is the ability to distinguish internally self-generated information from outside reality (externally-derived information). In the present study, we examined the relationship of self-agency between lower-level speech feedback monitoring (i...
2018: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Nora E Fritz, Nicholas R Boileau, Julie C Stout, Rebecca Ready, Joel S Perlmutter, Jane S Paulsen, Kimberly Quaid, Stacey Barton, Michael K McCormack, Susan L Perlman, Noelle E Carlozzi
Up to 90% of individuals with Huntington's disease (HD)-a progressive, inherited neurodegenerative disorder-experience apathy. Apathy is particularly debilitating because it is marked by a reduction in goal-directed behaviors, including self-care, social interactions, and mobility. The objective of this study was to examine relationships between variables of apathy, functional status, physical function, cognitive function, behavioral status/emotional function, and health-related quality of life. Clinician-rated measures of physical, cognitive, and behavioral function, including one clinician-rated item on apathy, and self-reported measures of physical function, health-related quality of life, and emotional, cognitive, and social function were collected in a single session from 487 persons with the HD mutation (prodromal, N=193; early-stage manifest, N=186; late-stage manifest, N=108)...
March 21, 2018: Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Esther M J Bekkers, Kim Dockx, Surendar Devan, Sam Van Rossom, Sabine M P Verschueren, Bastiaan R Bloem, Alice Nieuwboer
BACKGROUND: Postural instability and freezing of gait (FOG) are major problems in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), and both contribute to falls. However, the interrelationship between these 2 deficits is still unclear. OBJECTIVE: This study investigated whether dual-tasking influenced postural control differently in freezers (FOG+) and nonfreezers (FOG-). METHODS: Thirty-three patients with PD (19 FOG+, 14 FOG-, well-matched) and 28 healthy controls underwent 4 postural control tasks, consisting of standing on either stable or unstable surfaces with eyes open or closed...
February 2018: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
Lisa G Sorensen, Katie Neighbors, Regina M Hardison, Kathleen M Loomes, James W Varni, Vicky L Ng, Robert H Squires, Estella M Alonso
OBJECTIVE: To determine health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and neurocognitive impairment in survivors of pediatric acute liver failure (PALF). STUDY DESIGN: A longitudinal prospective study was conducted. At 6 and 12 months after PALF presentation, surveys of HRQoL were completed for 2- to 19-year-olds and executive functioning for ages 2-16 years. At 12 months, patients 3-16 years of age completed neurocognitive testing. HRQoL scores were compared with a healthy, matched sample...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
Moran Gilat, Ana Lígia Silva de Lima, Bastiaan R Bloem, James M Shine, Jorik Nonnekes, Simon J G Lewis
Freezing of gait is a devastating symptom of Parkinson's disease and other forms of parkinsonism. It poses a major burden on both patients and their families, as freezing often leads to falls, fall-related injuries and a loss of independence. Treating freezing of gait is difficult for a variety of reasons: it has a paroxysmal and unpredictable nature; a multifaceted pathophysiology, with an interplay between motor elements (disturbed stepping mechanisms) and non-motor elements (cognitive decline, anxiety); and a complex (and likely heterogeneous) underlying neural substrate, involving multiple failing neural networks...
March 12, 2018: Parkinsonism & related Disorders
Tina D Kristensen, Rene C W Mandl, Jens R M Jepsen, Egill Rostrup, Louise B Glenthøj, Merete Nordentoft, Birte Y Glenthøj, Bjørn H Ebdrup
OBJECTIVE: Neuroplasticity is a well-described phenomenon, but effects of non-pharmacological interventions on white matter (WM) are unclear. Here we review associations between active non-pharmacological interventions and WM organization in healthy subjects and in psychiatric patients. METHOD: A systematic review of non-psychiatric and psychiatric studies in MEDLINE and EMBASE databases. We included longitudinal, controlled studies in human participants aged 18-60 years published in peer-reviewed journals between 2000 and 2017...
March 14, 2018: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Sumona Chaudhury, Gloria K Mayondi, Paige L Williams, Jean Leidner, Roger Shapiro, Modiegi Diseko, Gbolahan Ajibola, Penny Holding, Vicki Tepper, Joseph Makhema, Chipo Petlo, George R Seage, Shahin Lockman, Betsy Kammerer
OBJECTIVE: Conflicting data exist regarding the impact of in utero exposure to maternal combination antiretrovirals. We compared neurodevelopmental outcomes between HIV-exposed/uninfected (HEU) children exposed in utero to 3-drug combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) versus zidovudine (ZDV) monotherapy. DESIGN: Prospective study of child neurodevelopment, nested within two cohorts of HIV-infected mothers and their children in Botswana (one observational, one interventional)...
March 15, 2018: AIDS
Varinder Singh, Pawan Krishan, Richa Shri
Oxidative stress is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of stroke. Strategies using antioxidants to improve neurological functions after stroke have, thus, gained significant attention. Ocimum basilicum L. is used traditionally to treat CNS disorders. Its antioxidant capacity is well established. Our laboratory has reported protective effects of pre-treatment with O. basilicum in experimental stroke, but its curative (post-treatment) effects in ischemic stroke have not been documented. Hence, the present study was aimed to evaluate the effect of O...
March 15, 2018: Metabolic Brain Disease
Rupesh K Chikara, Erik C Chang, Yi-Chen Lu, Dar-Shong Lin, Chin-Teng Lin, Li-Wei Ko
A reward or punishment can modulate motivation and emotions, which in turn affect cognitive processing. The present simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging-electroencephalography study examines neural mechanisms of response inhibition under the influence of a monetary reward or punishment by implementing a modified stop-signal task in a virtual battlefield scenario. The participants were instructed to play as snipers who open fire at a terrorist target but withhold shooting in the presence of a hostage...
2018: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Charlotte Zerna, Amy Y X Yu, Jayesh Modi, Shiel K Patel, Jonathan I Coulter, Eric E Smith, Shelagh B Coutts
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: White matter lesions (WML) are associated with cognitive decline, increased stroke risk, and disability in old age. We hypothesized that superimposed acute cerebrovascular occlusion on chronic preexisting injury (leukoaraiosis) leads to worse outcome after minor cerebrovascular event, both using quantitative (volumetric) and qualitative (Fazekas scale) assessment, as well as relative total brain volume. METHODS: WML volume assessment was performed in 425 patients with high-risk transient ischemic attack (TIA; motor/speech deficits >5 minutes) or minor strokes from the CATCH study (CT and MRI in the Triage of TIA and Minor Cerebrovascular Events to Identify High Risk Patients)...
March 14, 2018: Stroke; a Journal of Cerebral Circulation
Jonathan W Brandon, Justin K Solarczyk, Timur S Durrani
Lead toxicity is an important environmental disease and its effects on the human body can be devastating. Unique exposures to Special Operations Forces personnel may include use of firing ranges, use of automotive fuels, production of ammunition, and bodily retention of bullets. Toxicity may degrade physical and psychological fitness, and cause long-term negative health outcomes. Specific effects on fine motor movements, reaction times, and global function could negatively affect shooting skills and decision-making...
2018: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
Colleen Peyton, Michael D Schreiber, Michael E Msall
AIM: To determine the relationship between the Test of Infant Motor Performance (TIMP) at 3 months and cognitive, language, and motor outcomes on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition (Bayley-III) at 2 years of age in high-risk infants born preterm. METHOD: One hundred and six infants (47 females, 59 males) born at earlier than 31 weeks gestational age were prospectively tested with the TIMP at 10 to 15 weeks after term age and were assessed again with the Bayley-III at 2 years corrected age...
March 13, 2018: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Fabian Blasberg, Lars Wojtecki, Saskia Elben, Philipp Jörg Slotty, Jan Vesper, Alfons Schnitzler, Stefan Jun Groiss
BACKGROUND: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for Parkinson's disease (PD) is usually performed as awake surgery allowing sufficient intraoperative testing. Recently, outcomes after asleep surgery have been assumed comparable. However, direct comparisons between awake and asleep surgery are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the difference between awake and asleep surgery comparing motor and nonmotor outcome after subthalamic nucleus (STN)-DBS in a large single center PD population...
March 13, 2018: Neuromodulation: Journal of the International Neuromodulation Society
Lizanne Schweren, Pieter Hoekstra, Marloes van Lieshout, Jaap Oosterlaan, Nanda Lambregts-Rommelse, Jan Buitelaar, Barbara Franke, Catharina Hartman
BACKGROUND: Methodological and ethical constraints have hampered studies into long-term lasting outcomes of stimulant treatment in individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Lasting effects may be beneficial (i.e. improved functioning even when treatment is temporarily ceased) or detrimental (i.e. worse functioning while off medication), but both hypotheses currently lack empirical support. Here we investigate whether stimulant treatment history predicts long-term development of ADHD symptoms, social-emotional functioning or cognition, measured after medication wash-out...
March 13, 2018: Psychological Medicine
Jannike Øyen, Ingrid Kvestad, Lisa Kolden Midtbø, Ingvild Eide Graff, Mari Hysing, Kjell Morten Stormark, Maria Wik Markhus, Valborg Baste, Livar Frøyland, Berthold Koletzko, Hans Demmelmair, Lisbeth Dahl, Øyvind Lie, Marian Kjellevold
BACKGROUND: Marine resources including fatty fish are important sources of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFAs), which are important for brain development. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled trial (RCT) investigating the impact of fatty fish on cognition in preschool children. The purpose of the trial was to investigate whether an increased intake of fatty fish compared to meat improves cognitive function in children 4-6 years old. METHODS: The children (n = 232) in this two-armed RCT, Fish Intervention Studies-KIDS (FINS-KIDS) were recruited from 13 kindergartens in Bergen, Norway...
March 12, 2018: BMC Medicine
Vicky L Ng, Lisa G Sorensen, Estella M Alonso, Emily M Fredericks, Wen Ye, Jeff Moore, Saul J Karpen, Benjamin L Shneider, Jean P Molleston, Jorge A Bezerra, Karen F Murray, Kathleen M Loomes, Philip Rosenthal, Robert H Squires, Kasper Wang, Ronen Arnon, Kathleen B Schwarz, Yumirle P Turmelle, Barbara H Haber, Averell H Sherker, John C Magee, Ronald J Sokol
OBJECTIVES: To assess neurodevelopmental outcomes among participants with biliary atresia with their native liver at ages 12 months (group 1) and 24 months (group 2), and to evaluate variables predictive of neurodevelopmental impairment. STUDY DESIGN: Participants enrolled in a prospective, longitudinal, multicenter study underwent neurodevelopmental testing with either the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 2nd edition, or Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, 3rd edition...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Pediatrics
Stephanie L Merhar, Jennifer M McAllister, Kathryn E Wedig-Stevie, Amy C Klein, Jareen Meinzen-Derr, Brenda B Poindexter
OBJECTIVE: Little is known about developmental outcomes in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). We hypothesized that children treated for NAS would score lower than the normative sample on the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, 3rd edition. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a retrospective cohort study of 87 infants treated for NAS and evaluated at 2 years of age. RESULTS: Children treated for NAS scored significantly lower than the norm (mean 100) on all 3 subscales (cognitive mean 96...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Perinatology: Official Journal of the California Perinatal Association
Kristen L Nowak, Michel Chonchol
Chronic, low-grade inflammation is a common comorbid condition in chronic kidney disease (CKD), and particularly in chronic dialysis patients. In this review, we consider the question of whether inflammation affects outcomes in dialysis patients. Levels of proinflammatory cytokines, as well as C-reactive protein, are elevated in chronic dialysis patients. Multiple factors likely contribute to chronic inflammatory activation in kidney disease patients including the uremic milieu, lifestyle and epigenetic influences, infectious and thrombotic events, the dialysis process, and dysbiosis...
March 7, 2018: Seminars in Dialysis
Kyoungjune Pak, Hae Kyung Shin, Eun-Joo Kim, Jae-Hyeok Lee, Chul Hyoung Lyoo, Jongsang Son, Myung Jun Lee
INTRODUCTION: Weight loss in Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with poorer clinical outcomes and rapid disease progression. However, it is unclear whether a longitudinal association between weight loss and striatal dopaminergic degeneration exists. METHODS: Using data from 171 PD patients in the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) cohort, we investigated longitudinal associations of change in body mass index (BMI) with striatal dopaminergic activity on123 I-N-3-fluoropropyl-2-beta-carboxymethoxy-3beta-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane (123 I-FP-CIT) single positron emission computed tomography (SPECT)...
February 28, 2018: Parkinsonism & related Disorders
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