Read by QxMD icon Read


Takuya Takeichi, Kazumitsu Sugiura, Toshifumi Nomura, Taiko Sakamoto, Yasushi Ogawa, Naoki Oiso, Yuko Futei, Aki Fujisaki, Akiko Koizumi, Yumi Aoyama, Kimiko Nakajima, Yutaka Hatano, Kei Hayashi, Akemi Ishida-Yamamoto, Sakuhei Fujiwara, Shigetoshi Sano, Keiji Iwatsuki, Akira Kawada, Yasushi Suga, Hiroshi Shimizu, John A McGrath, Masashi Akiyama
Importance: We found CARD14 mutations (2 de novo novel mutations and another previously reported mutation) in 3 of 3 patients with pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) type V, but not in patients with PRP of other types. Our findings, combined with the published literature, suggest that type V PRP, both familial and sporadic, can be caused by CARD14 mutations. Detailed clinical observation revealed that all 3 patients displayed unique patchy macular brown hyperpigmentation. Objective: To further determine how often patients with PRP have pathogenic mutations in CARD14 and to elucidate which clinical subtype of PRP is caused by CARD14 mutations...
October 19, 2016: JAMA Dermatology
Min Soo Jang, Dong Young Kang, Jong Bin Park, Joon Hee Kim, Kwi Ae Park, Hark Rim, Kee Suck Suh
BACKGROUND: Pityriasis lichenoides (PL)-like skin lesions rarely appear as a specific manifestation of mycosis fungoides (MF). OBJECTIVE: We investigated the clinicopathological features, immunophenotypes, and treatments of PL-like MF. METHODS: This study included 15 patients with PL-like lesions selected from a population of 316 patients diagnosed with MF at one institution. RESULTS: The patients were between 4 and 59 years of age...
October 2016: Annals of Dermatology
A Paganelli, S Ciardo, G Odorici, G Pellacani, A Conti
Pityriasis rubra pilaris (PRP) is a rare, chronic inflammatory skin disorder characterized by the presence of small follicular hyperkeratotic papules that coalesce into yellow-pink (salmon-colored) patches, usually beginning at the head and neck and often resulting in generalized erythroderma(1) . Other main clinical features are "islands" of sparing within the affected skin, palmoplantar keratoderma, nail dystrophy, oral involvement and eventually ectropion. The age of onset has a peak between 50 and 70 years but a juvenile presentation is not uncommon...
October 14, 2016: Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology: JEADV
Giulia Ciccarese, Francesco Drago
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Indian Dermatology Online Journal
Daniel Schuster, Andrea Pfister-Wartha, Leena Bruckner-Tuderman, Christoph M Schempp
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 5, 2016: JAMA Dermatology
W P Silva-Rocha, M F de Azevedo, G M Chaves
OBJECTIVE: Dermatomycoses are superficial fungal infections which affect the skin, hair and nails of humans and animals. Male and female patients of all ages are affected by this condition. The main etiological agents of dermatomycoses are the dermatophytes fungi of the genera Trichophyton, Microsporum and Epidermophyton, while the main yeasts belong to the genera Candida, Malassezia and Trichosporon. The variation in the distribution of dermatomycoses worldwide justify the conduction of epidemiological studies in order to contribute for the better understanding of patterns of mycological cutaneous infections...
September 20, 2016: Journal de Mycologie Médicale
Enzo Errichetti, Giuseppe Stinco
Clinical distinction between pityriasis amiantacea-like tinea capitis and pityriasis amiantacea due to noninfectious inflammatory diseases is a troublesome task, with a significant likelihood of diagnostic errors/delays and prescription of inappropriate therapies. We report a case of pityriasis amiantacea-like tinea capitis with its dermoscopic findings in order to highlight the usefulness of dermoscopy in improving the recognition of such a condition.
July 2016: Dermatology Practical & Conceptual
Tiffany Y Loh, Philip R Cohen
BACKGROUND: Pityriasis rosea is a papulosquamous disease. It may occur during pregnancy; in this setting, it has occasionally been associated with adverse outcomes. PURPOSE: A woman who developed pityriasis rosea at the beginning of her eighth week of gestation is described. The outcomes in newborns delivered by pregnant women who developed pityriasis rosea during gestation are summarized. METHOD: A 28-year-old woman developed pityriasis rosea during her eighth week of pregnancy...
July 2016: Dermatology Practical & Conceptual
Cary S Crall, Jillian F Rork, Sophia Delano, Jennifer T Huang
Phototherapy can be a safe and effective treatment for various skin diseases in children. Special considerations governing the use of this treatment modality in pediatric populations include patient, family, and facility-based factors that are oriented around heightened concerns with regard to safety and tolerability of treatment. Although phototherapy has been found to be effective in a wide range of dermatologic conditions affecting pediatric populations, including psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, pityriasis lichenoides, cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, and vitiligo, there is need for additional research on other conditions in which phototherapy has shown promise...
September 2016: Clinics in Dermatology
Andac Salman, Dilek Seckin Gencosmanoglu, Ayse Deniz Yucelten, Nursel Elcioglu, Gabriele Richard, Cuyan Demirkesen
Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare genodermatosis causing ichthyosis-like skin lesions, keratitis, and deafness. Herein, we report a patient with this rare syndrome in association with pityriasis lichenoides chronica, which was succesfully treated with narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy despite our concerns regarding the increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma, hyperpyrexia, and keratitis.
May 15, 2016: Dermatology Online Journal
Enzo Errichetti, Giuseppe Stinco
Over the last few years, dermoscopy has been shown to be a useful tool in assisting the noninvasive diagnosis of various general dermatological disorders. In this article, we sought to provide an up-to-date practical overview on the use of dermoscopy in general dermatology by analysing the dermoscopic differential diagnosis of relatively common dermatological disorders grouped according to their clinical presentation, i.e. dermatoses presenting with erythematous-desquamative patches/plaques (plaque psoriasis, eczematous dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, mycosis fungoides and subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus), papulosquamous/papulokeratotic dermatoses (lichen planus, pityriasis rosea, papulosquamous sarcoidosis, guttate psoriasis, pityriasis lichenoides chronica, classical pityriasis rubra pilaris, porokeratosis, lymphomatoid papulosis, papulosquamous chronic GVHD, parakeratosis variegata, Grover disease, Darier disease and BRAF-inhibitor-induced acantholytic dyskeratosis), facial inflammatory skin diseases (rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, discoid lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, cutaneous leishmaniasis, lupus vulgaris, granuloma faciale and demodicidosis), acquired keratodermas (chronic hand eczema, palmar psoriasis, keratoderma due to mycosis fungoides, keratoderma resulting from pityriasis rubra pilaris, tinea manuum, palmar lichen planus and aquagenic palmar keratoderma), sclero-atrophic dermatoses (necrobiosis lipoidica, morphea and cutaneous lichen sclerosus), hypopigmented macular diseases (extragenital guttate lichen sclerosus, achromic pityriasis versicolor, guttate vitiligo, idiopathic guttate hypomelanosis, progressive macular hypomelanosis and postinflammatory hypopigmentations), hyperpigmented maculopapular diseases (pityriasis versicolor, lichen planus pigmentosus, Gougerot-Carteaud syndrome, Dowling-Degos disease, erythema ab igne, macular amyloidosis, lichen amyloidosus, friction melanosis, terra firma-forme dermatosis, urticaria pigmentosa and telangiectasia macularis eruptiva perstans), itchy papulonodular dermatoses (hypertrophic lichen planus, prurigo nodularis, nodular scabies and acquired perforating dermatosis), erythrodermas (due to psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, mycosis fungoides, pityriasis rubra pilaris and scabies), noninfectious balanitis (Zoon's plasma cell balanitis, psoriatic balanitis, seborrheic dermatitis and non-specific balanitis) and erythroplasia of Queyrat, inflammatory cicatricial alopecias (scalp discoid lupus erythematosus, lichen planopilaris, frontal fibrosing alopecia and folliculitis decalvans), nonscarring alopecias (alopecia areata, trichotillomania, androgenetic alopecia and telogen effluvium) and scaling disorders of the scalp (tinea capitis, scalp psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis and pityriasis amiantacea)...
September 9, 2016: Dermatology and Therapy
Krishna A J Mutgi, Mohammed Milhem, Brian L Swick, Vincent Liu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2016: JAAD Case Reports
Somenath Sarkar, Dipayan Sengupta, Sukumar Basak, Shabab Ahmed Damji, Devesh Kumar Shukla, Deep Anurag
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2016: Indian Dermatology Online Journal
Fadime Kilinc, Ayse Akbas, Sertac Sener, Akın Aktaş
BACKGROUND: Pityriasis rosea (PR) is a common, acute, self-limiting inflammatory skin disease. It can easily be recognized with its typical clinical presentation. However, unusual clinic presentations can cause difficulty in diagnosis. Up to now, not many atypical forms are reported. OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical characteristics of patients with atypical pityriasis rosea. METHODS: A total of 27 cases, diagnosed as atypical PR by clinical and/or histopathological examination and applied to the outpatient clinic of dermatology department between the years 2007 and 2015 were analyzed retrospectively...
September 26, 2016: Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology
Talel Badri, Houda Hammami, Neila Bzioueche, Bechir Zouari, Inçaf Mokhtar
BACKGROUND: The efficacy of ketoconazole and fluconazole in pityriasis versicolor had been proved. AIM: To compare the efficacy and the safety of two doses of fluconazole given 1 week apart alone or associated to ketoconazole shampoo. METHODS: Our study included all patients with pityriasis versicolor who attended in dermatology department of Habib Thameur Hospital, Tunis (over a 21-month period). During the considered period, patients were randomly assigned in two study groups: G1 receiving fluconazole two doses 300mg given 1 week apart with G2 taken an association of fluconazole (two doses 300mg given 1 week apart) and ketoconazole shampoo the first day...
February 2016: La Tunisie Médicale
Megan Werntz, Carlene Chun, Brandon Michael Togioka
Pityriasis rosea (PR) is an acute exanthematous skin disease that is likely due to reactivation of human herpesviruses (HHVs) 6b and 7. In contrast to herpes simplex and zoster (alphaherpesviruses), HHV-6b and -7 (betaherpesviruses) are not found predominantly in skin lesions. This difference in virion location may decrease the possibility of causing central nervous system infection through skin contamination, but the risk for hematogenous spread likely remains the same. This article uses the first-known epidural placement through active PR to illustrate risk-benefit considerations when deciding between neuraxial and general anesthesia for obstetric patients with PR...
October 15, 2016: A & A Case Reports
Kaja Męcińska-Jundziłł, Agnieszka Białecka, Urszula Adamska, Ewa Skrzeczko-Kwela, Rafał Czajkowski
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2016: Postȩpy Dermatologii i Alergologii
Aysegul Uludağ, Sevilay Oguz Kılıc, Selda Isık, Yusuf Haydar Ertekin, Murat Tekin, Sibel Cevizci, Zerrin Ogretmen, Naci Topaloglu, Erkan Melih Sahin, Birol Cıbık
INTRODUCTION: Skin lesions may be of dermatological importance, affect appearance, and cause problems communicating with peers and may be especially more significant in childhood. AIM: Information on the prevalence of pediatric dermatoses in Western Turkey. This study was aimed to define the existing data. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Canakkale, Turkey, in September-December 2013. It involved 1,957 students from five randomly selected primary and secondary schools...
June 2016: Postȩpy Dermatologii i Alergologii
Khushbu Mahajan, Vineet Relhan, Aditi Kochhar Relhan, Vijay Kumar Garg
Pityriasis rosea (PR) is a benign papulosquamous disorder seen commonly in clinical practice. Despite its prevalence and benign nature, there are still times when this common disorder presents in an uncommon way or course posing diagnostic or management problems for the treating physician. The etiopathogenesis of PR has always been a dilemma, and extensive research is going on to elicit the exact cause. This review focuses mainly on the difficult aspects of this benign common disorder such as etiopathogenesis, atypical manifestations, recurrent cases, differential diagnosis, therapy and pregnancy considerations...
July 2016: Indian Journal of Dermatology
Sushma Hosamane, Muktha Pai, Thoppil Reba Philipose, Umaru Nayarmoole
INTRODUCTION: Papulosquamous diseases are characterized by scaly papules and plaques with similar clinical picture which amounts to confusion and hence, a definitive histopathological diagnosis goes a long way in treatment of such diseases. AIM: The aim of the study was to study the histomorphology of non-infectious, erythaematous, papulosquamous lesions of skin with clinicopathological correlation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Skin biopsies from 150 clinically diagnosed/suspected non-infectious erythaematous, papulosquamous skin diseases were received in the Department of Pathology...
June 2016: Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research: JCDR
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"