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Fang Meng, Pei-Bei Duan, Junya Zhu, Qing-Qing Lou, Zhao-Hui Fang, Hong-Li An, Lan-Ying Liu, Yue Hu, Qian Hu
OBJECTIVE: This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of Gua sha therapy on perimenopausal symptoms, quality of life, and serum female hormones in participants with perimenopausal syndrome. METHODS: A prospective, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted at the First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine in China. Eighty women with perimenopausal syndrome were recruited and randomized into an intervention group or a control group...
October 10, 2016: Menopause: the Journal of the North American Menopause Society
Gordon Parker, Stacey McCraw
BACKGROUND: The CORE measure was designed to assess a central feature of melancholia - signs of psychomotor disturbance (PMD) - and so provide an alternate non-symptom based measure of melancholia or of its probability. This review evaluates development and application studies undertaken over the last 25 years to consider how well it has met its original objectives. METHODS: All studies published using the CORE measure as either the only or an adjunctive measure of melancholia were obtained and are considered in this review...
September 25, 2016: Journal of Affective Disorders
Marcin Siwek, Magdalena Sowa-Kućma, Krzysztof Styczeń, Paulina Misztak, Rafał J Nowak, Bernadeta Szewczyk, Dominika Dudek, Janusz K Rybakowski, Gabriel Nowak, Michael Maes
To examine cytokine receptor biomarkers in bipolar disorder (BD), we recruited 133 well-phenotyped BD patients and 50 normal controls and measured serum levels of soluble interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (sIL-1RA), soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R), sIL-6R, and tumor necrosis factor receptor 60 and 80 kDa (sTNFR60/80). sIL-1RA and sTNFR80 are significantly higher in BD than in controls and sTNFR80 and higher in melancholic than in non-melancholic patients and controls. Kapczinski's stages 3 + 4 are characterized by lowered sIL-2R and increased sTNFR80 levels...
September 23, 2016: Molecular Neurobiology
Osvaldo P Almeida
Written records have been describing extreme states of emotions since ancient Greece (Angst and Marneros, 2001), but Aretaeus of Cappadocia (which is geographically located in modern Turkey) was probably the first to outline the close relationship between depression and mania nearly 2000 years ago: "I think that melancholia is the beginning and a part of mania. . . The development of mania is really a worsening of the disease rather than a change into another disease. . . In most of them the sadness became better after various lengths of time and changed into happiness; the patients then developed a mania" (Angst and Marneros, 2001)...
September 16, 2016: International Psychogeriatrics
Brian Watermeyer
Social scientific analyses of inequality inform interventions ranging from the material and political to the personal and psychological. At the extremes of this continuum, Marxian militants view the exploration of the inner lives of oppressed people as irrelevant to liberation, while psychoanalysts bemoan the naïveté of "depsychologized" conceptions of the social subject. While both approaches have been applied to disability inequality, an historical materialist view has dominated the discipline of disability studies, where attention has only recently turned to psychological aspects of oppression...
September 8, 2016: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
Veerle Bergink, Natalie Rasgon, Katherine L Wisner
OBJECTIVE: Psychosis or mania after childbirth is a psychiatric emergency with risk for suicide and infanticide. METHOD: The authors reviewed the epidemiologic and genetic research and physiological postpartum triggers (endocrine, immunological, circadian) of psychosis. They also summarized all systematic reviews and synthesized the sparse clinical studies to provide diagnostic recommendations, treatment options, and strategies for prevention. RESULTS: The incidence of first-lifetime onset postpartum psychosis/mania from population-based register studies of psychiatric admissions varies from 0...
September 9, 2016: American Journal of Psychiatry
Tsutomu Takahashi, Yumiko Nishikawa, Murat Yücel, Sarah Whittle, Valentina Lorenzetti, Mark Walterfang, Daiki Sasabayashi, Michio Suzuki, Christos Pantelis, Nicholas B Allen
Olfactory deficits have been reported in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, it remains largely unknown whether MDD is associated with abnormalities in olfactory sulcus morphology, a potential marker of olfactory system development. This magnetic resonance imaging study investigated the length and depth of the olfactory sulcus in 29 currently depressed patients, 27 remitted depressed patients, and 33 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects. Both current and remitted MDD patients had significantly shallower olfactory sulci bilaterally as compared with controls...
September 30, 2016: Psychiatry Research
Abbas Sadeghfard, Ali Reza Bozorgi, Shaghayegh Ahmadi, Masoumeh Shojaei
BACKGROUND: Melancholia is a kind of depression with the most common symptoms of evident mental disorder, slimness, lack of enjoyment, feeling guilty and having no appetite. In modern medicine, the word "melancholia" only refers to mental and affective symptoms of depression. However, historically, it could have physical symptoms as well as mental symptoms and the atrabilious situations were categorized according to their common reasons rather than their specific characteristics. This study aimed to enlighten the history of this disease...
May 2016: Iranian Journal of Medical Sciences
Pina Antinucci
In this paper, I propose a psychoanalytic reading of some of the writings of Amelia Rosselli, a trilingual poet who, at the age of seven, lost her father Carlo, who was persecuted and murdered by Mussolini's regime. History and her history conflate into personal and collective trauma which defies human possibilities to work through and mourn. Rosselli's work testifies to such predicament of the human subject of the 20th century, his/her dislocation, alienation and internal irreconcilable divisions. In particular I examine Diary in three tongues, which is the most autobiographical of her works and a self-analytic piece, written after the conclusion of her second analysis...
July 20, 2016: International Journal of Psycho-analysis
Brittany L Mason, E Sherwood Brown, Paul E Croarkin
Mood is the changing expression of emotion and can be described as a spectrum. The outermost ends of this spectrum highlight two states, the lowest low, melancholia, and the highest high, mania. These mood extremes have been documented repeatedly in human history, being first systematically described by Hippocrates. Nineteenth century contemporaries Falret and Baillarger described two forms of an extreme mood disorder, with the validity and accuracy of both debated. Regardless, the concept of a cycling mood disease was accepted before the end of the 19th century...
July 15, 2016: Behavioral Sciences
Gordon Parker
OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to offer some personal observations as to how melancholia can be diagnosed and differentiated from the non-melancholic depressive conditions. METHODS: Personal clinical and research-based observations are presented following a critique of common current strategies. RESULTS: The paper offers views on the most differentiating clinical features, argues for adding illness course variables to symptoms and provides details of the Sydney Melancholic Prototypic Index, a measure with a high overall classification rate in differentiating melancholic and non-melancholic depression...
July 15, 2016: Australasian Psychiatry: Bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
Gavin Rush, Aoife O'Donovan, Laura Nagle, Catherine Conway, AnnMaria McCrohan, Cliona O'Farrelly, James V Lucey, Kevin M Malone
BACKGROUND: Immune system dysfunction is implicated in the pathophysiology of major depression, and is hypothesized to normalize with successful treatment. We aimed to investigate immune dysfunction in melancholic depression and its response to ECT. METHODS: 55 melancholic depressed patients and 26 controls participated. 33 patients (60%) were referred for ECT. Blood samples were taken at baseline, one hour after the first ECT session, and 48h after ECT series completion...
June 17, 2016: Journal of Affective Disorders
Gordon Parker
OBJECTIVES: The objective of this article is to offer a personal perspective on managing melancholia by interpreting both the limited salient evidence base and offering clinical observations. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that medication needs to be prioritised, that not all antidepressants are equally potent for those with melancholia and that as response to a single antidepressant alone (especially a narrow-spectrum one) is low, management commonly requires broader-spectrum antidepressant drugs and augmentation strategies...
July 12, 2016: Australasian Psychiatry: Bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists
Teresa Pinheiro, Julio Verztman, Diane Viana
This paper discusses ideas about depression as a paradigmatic symptom of contemporaneous psychological suffering and makes a comparison between depression and melancholia. The ideas we describe were stimulated by two comparative studies that were conducted based on an analysis of how depressed subjects relate to the concept of desire, their feelings of shame and their self-image in today's age.
July 4, 2016: American Journal of Psychoanalysis
Pierre Alexis Geoffroy, Alain Duhamel, Hélène Behal, Nadia Zouitina-Lietaert, Julie Duthilleul, Louise Marquette, François Ducrocq, Guillaume Vaiva, Benjamin Rolland
Important discrepancies exist between physicians in deciding when to perform involuntary hospitalization measures (IHMs). The factors underlying these differences are poorly known.We conducted a two-year single-center retrospective study in France on patients who were referred to the emergency department (ED) with an IHM certificate written by a private-practice General Practitioner (GP). For each consultation, the official IHM motive was categorized into four groups: Suicide; Psychosis, Mania, or Melancholia (PMM); Agitation; and Other...
2016: Scientific Reports
Noa Tsujii, Wakako Mikawa, Emi Tsujimoto, Hiroyuki Akashi, Toru Adachi, Eiji Kirime, Osamu Shirakawa
This study aimed to determine whether quality of life (QOL) reflects specific functional abnormalities of frontotemporal hemodynamic responses in melancholia. We recruited 30 patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) with melancholic features (MDD-MF), 52 with non-melancholic features (MDD-NMF), and 68 healthy control subjects who were matched for age, sex ratio, and years of education. QOL was assessed using the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), and regional hemodynamic responses during a verbal fluency task were monitored with near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS)...
July 30, 2016: Psychiatry Research
John Cutting, Maria Mouratidou, Thomas Fuchs, Gareth Owen
Kurt Schneider (1887-1967) met Max Scheler (1874-1928) in 1919 when he enrolled in the latter's philosophy seminars at the University of Cologne. Kurt Schneider was then a junior psychiatrist and Max Scheler a renowned philosophy professor and co-founder of the phenomenological movement in philosophy. We uncover the facts about their intellectual and personal relationship, summarize the main articles and books that they wrote and consider whether Max Scheler did influence the young Kurt Schneider. We conclude that Scheler's philosophy of emotion impressed Schneider, and that the latter's notion of 'vital depression' as the core element in melancholia was essentially applied Schelerian philosophy...
September 2016: History of Psychiatry
Huiting Liu, Casey Sarapas, Stewart A Shankman
Dysfunctional reward processing has long been considered an important feature of major depressive disorder (MDD). However, depression is a heterogeneous construct and the nature of this heterogeneity may contribute to some of the inconsistent empirical findings on reward dysfunction in MDD. The current study examined 1 source of heterogeneity, melancholic symptoms, and its association with reward processing. In individuals with MDD (N = 141) and MDD-free controls (N = 113), electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha asymmetry was measured during a behavioral reward task that probed reward anticipation...
July 2016: Journal of Abnormal Psychology
Augusto Castagnini
This was the first paper by the Italian alienist Eugenio Tanzi (1856-1934). It surveyed existing works and provided an analysis of clinical categories such as monomania, sensory madness, moral insanity, Wahnsinn, Verrücktheit and systematized delusions, which had been used in France, Germany, Britain and Italy since the early nineteenth century to deal with paranoia. As pointed out by Tanzi, discrepancies and discontinuities in diagnostic concepts affected both psychiatric nosology and practice. Paranoia (from the Greek παρά and νοια) made for greater clarity in psychiatric terminology, and denoted a broad category, including both acute and chronic delusional states which were considered to be distinct from mania and melancholia, and usually not to lead to mental deterioration...
June 2016: History of Psychiatry
Kenneth S Kendler
How should DSM criteria relate to the disorders they are designed to assess? To address this question empirically, the author examines how well DSM-5 symptomatic criteria for major depression capture the descriptions of clinical depression in the post-Kraepelin Western psychiatric tradition as described in textbooks published between 1900 and 1960. Eighteen symptoms and signs of depression were described, 10 of which are covered by the DSM criteria for major depression or melancholia. For two symptoms (mood and cognitive content), DSM criteria are considerably narrower than those described in the textbooks...
August 1, 2016: American Journal of Psychiatry
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