Read by QxMD icon Read

Pattern Recognition Receptors

Tan A Nguyen, Ken C Pang, Seth L Masters
An effective innate immune response relies on the detection of pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by various host pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that result in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Viruses and bacteria have co-evolved with the immune system and developed multiple strategies to usurp or circumvent host machinery and blunt the innate immune response in infected cells. Recently, it has become apparent that infected or dying cells can transmit PAMPs and host PRR signalling proteins to uninfected bystander cells to thereby bypass pathogen evasion strategies, and potentiate innate immune signalling...
October 18, 2016: Molecular Immunology
V Sabater, F Ferrando, A Morera, L Palomar
Erythema annulare centrifugum (EAC) is a clinical reaction pattern that includes lupus erythematosus, spongiotic dermatitis (particularly pityriasis rosea), pseudolymphoma and cutaneous B-cell lymphoma. However, it can be the result of cutaneous metastasis by an internal carcinoma. We present the case of a 38-year-old woman with bilateral inflammatory breast cancer following multimodal therapy. After chemotherapy, the patient developed EAC on her back, clinically suspect of subacute cutaneous lupus erythematosus...
October 20, 2016: Clinical and Experimental Dermatology
Tobias Wiedemann, Stefan Hofbaur, Eva Loell, Gabriele Rieder
Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a potent neutrophil-activating chemokine which triggers the infiltration and migration of neutrophils into areas of bacterial infection. Helicobacter pylori-infected patient studies as well as animal models have revealed that H. pylori type I strains carrying an intact cytotoxin-associated gene pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) with a functional type IV secretion system (T4SS) induce IL-8 expression and secretion in gastric mucosa. This gastric mucosal IL-8 expression correlates with severe histological changes due to H...
September 29, 2016: European Journal of Microbiology & Immunology
Daniela Damasceno, Martín Pérez Andrés, Wouter Bl van den Bossche, Juan Flores-Montero, Sandra de Bruin, Cristina Teodosio, Jacques Jm van Dongen, Alberto Orfao, Julia Almeida
Although major steps have been recently made in understanding the role of the distinct subsets of dendritic cells (DC)/antigen-presenting cells (APC), further studies are required to unravel their precise role, including in-depth immunophenotypic characterisation of these cells. Here, we used eight-colour flow cytometry to investigate the reactivity of a panel of 72 monoclonal antibodies (including those clustered in seven new Cluster of Differentiation, CD) on different subsets of APC in peripheral blood (PB) samples from five healthy adults...
September 2016: Clinical & Translational Immunology
Camille Detree, Gustavo Núñez-Acuña, Steven Roberts, Cristian Gallardo-Escárate
Saxitoxin (STX), a principal phycotoxin contributing to paralytic shellfish poisoning, is largely produced by marine microalgae of the genus Alexandrium. This toxin affects a wide range of species, inducing massive deaths in fish and other marine species. However, marine bivalves can resist and accumulate paralytic shellfish poisons. Despite numerous studies on the impact of STX in marine bivalves, knowledge regarding STX recognition at molecular level by benthic species remains scarce. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify novel genes that interact with STX in the Chilean mussel Mytilus chilensis...
2016: PloS One
Ann Vu, Andrew Calzadilla, Sanaz Gidfar, Rafael Calderon-Candelario, Mehdi Mirsaeidi
Toll-like receptors are transmembrane glycoproteins predominantly expressed in tissues with immune function. They are considered one of the most important pattern recognition receptor families discovered at the end of 20(th) century and a key aspect of the innate immune system response to infectious disease. Here we present a review of the current knowledge of individual Toll-like receptors, 1 through 13, with a focus on their role in the immune system response to mycobacterial infection. We present literature to date about the Toll-like receptors structure, localization and expression, signaling pathways, and function...
October 15, 2016: European Journal of Pharmacology
Raphaela Mayerhofer, Esther E Fröhlich, Florian Reichmann, Aitak Farzi, Nora Kogelnik, Eleonore Fröhlich, Wolfgang Sattler, Peter Holzer
Microbial metabolites are known to affect immune system, brain, and behavior via activation of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Unlike the effect of the TLR4 agonist lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the role of other TLR agonists in immune-brain communication is insufficiently understood. We therefore hypothesized that the TLR2 agonist lipoteichoic acid (LTA) causes immune activation in the periphery and brain, stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and has an adverse effect on blood-brain barrier (BBB) and emotional behavior...
October 14, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Yuki Hosokawa, Kouji Hirao, Hiromichi Yumoto, Ayako Washio, Tadashi Nakanishi, Daisuke Takegawa, Chiaki Kitamura, Takashi Matsuo
Caries-related pathogens are first recognized by odontoblasts and induce inflammatory events that develop to pulpitis. Generally, initial sensing of microbial pathogens is mediated by pattern recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptor and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD); however, little is known about NODs in odontoblasts. In this study, the levels of NODs expressed in rat odontoblastic cell line, KN-3, were assessed by flow cytometry and the levels of chemokines in NOD-specific ligand-stimulated KN-3 cells were analyzed by real-time PCR and ELISA...
2016: BioMed Research International
Sukhithasri Vijayrajratnam, Anju Choorakottayil Pushkaran, Aathira Balakrishnan, Anilkumar Vasudevan, Raja Gopi Biswas, Chethampadi Gopi Mohan
Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein 1 (NOD1) is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that recognizes bacterial peptidoglycan (PG) containing meso -diaminopimelic acid ( meso DAP) and activates the innate immune system. Interestingly, few pathogenic and commensal bacteria modify their PG stem peptide by amidation of meso DAP ( meso DAPNH2). In this study, NOD1 stimulation assays were performed using bacterial PG containing meso DAP (PGDAP) and meso DAPNH2 (PGDAPNH2) to understand the differences in their biomolecular recognition mechanism...
October 14, 2016: Biochemical Journal
Alon Vitenshtein, Yoav Charpak-Amikam, Rachel Yamin, Yoav Bauman, Batya Isaacson, Natan Stein, Orit Berhani, Liat Dassa, Moriya Gamliel, Chamutal Gur, Ariella Glasner, Carlos Gomez, Ronen Ben-Ami, Nir Osherov, Brendan P Cormack, Ofer Mandelboim
Natural killer (NK) cells form an important arm of the innate immune system and function to combat a wide range of invading pathogens, ranging from viruses to bacteria. However, the means by which NK cells accomplish recognition of pathogens with a limited repertoire of receptors remain largely unknown. In the current study, we describe the recognition of an emerging fungal pathogen, Candida glabrata, by the human NK cytotoxic receptor NKp46 and its mouse ortholog, NCR1. Using NCR1 knockout mice, we observed that this receptor-mediated recognition was crucial for controlling C...
October 12, 2016: Cell Host & Microbe
Lei Li, Yufei Yu, Zhaoyang Zhou, Jian-Min Zhou
Plants are exposed to numerous potential pathogenic microbes. To counter the threat, plants have evolved diverse patternrecognition receptors (PRRs), which are receptor kinases (RKs) and receptor proteins (RPs) specialized to detect conserved pathogen/microbe-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs/MAMPs). Although only a handful of RKs and RPs are known PRRs, they belong to the receptor-like kinase (RLK) and receptor-like protein (RLP) superfamilies that undergo lineagespecific expansion, suggesting that many of these RLKs and RLPs are potential PRRs...
October 12, 2016: Science China. Life Sciences
Darlene A Monlish, Sima T Bhatt, Laura G Schuettpelz
Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of pattern recognition receptors that shape the innate immune system by identifying pathogen-associated molecular patterns and host-derived damage-associated molecular patterns. TLRs are widely expressed on both immune cells and non-immune cells, including hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, effector immune cell populations, and endothelial cells. In addition to their well-known role in the innate immune response to acute infection or injury, accumulating evidence supports a role for TLRs in the development of hematopoietic and other malignancies...
2016: Frontiers in Immunology
Julien Moretti, J Magarian Blander
The innate immune response of phagocytes to microbes has long been known to depend on the core signaling cascades downstream of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which lead to expression and production of inflammatory cytokines that counteract infection and induce adaptive immunity. Cell-autonomous responses have recently emerged as important mechanisms of innate immunity. Either IFN-inducible or constitutive, these processes aim to guarantee cell homeostasis but have also been shown to modulate innate immune response to microbes and production of inflammatory cytokines...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Leukocyte Biology
Lance W Peterson, Naomi H Philip, Christopher P Dillon, John Bertin, Peter J Gough, Douglas R Green, Igor E Brodsky
Innate immune responses that are crucial for control of infection are often targeted by microbial pathogens. Blockade of NF-κB and MAPK signaling by the Yersinia virulence factor YopJ inhibits cytokine production by innate immune cells but also triggers cell death. This cell death requires RIPK1 kinase activity and caspase-8, which are engaged by TLR4 and the adaptor protein TRIF. Nevertheless, TLR4- and TRIF-deficient cells undergo significant apoptosis, implicating TLR4/TRIF-independent pathways in the death of Yersinia-infected cells...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Immunology: Official Journal of the American Association of Immunologists
Luigi Martino, Louise Holland, Evangelos Christodoulou, Simone Kunzelmann, Diego Esposito, Katrin Rittinger
NOD-like receptors represent an important class of germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors that play key roles in the regulation of inflammatory signalling pathways. They function as danger sensors and initiate inflammatory responses and the production of cytokines. Since NLR malfunction results in chronic inflammation and auto-immune diseases, there is a great interest in understanding how they work on a molecular level. To date, a lot of insight into the biological functions of NLRs is available but biophysical and structural studies have been hampered by the difficulty to produce soluble and stable recombinant NLR proteins...
2016: PloS One
Thomas A Kufer, Giulia Nigro, Philippe J Sansonetti
NOD-like receptor (NLR) proteins, as much as Toll-like receptor proteins, play a major role in modulating myeloid cells in their immune functions. There is still, however, limited knowledge on the expression and function of several of the mammalian NLR proteins in myeloid lineages. Still, the function of pyrin domain-containing NLR proteins and NLRC4/NAIP as inflammasome components that drive interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 maturation and secretion upon pathogen stimulation is well established. NOD1, NOD2, NLRP3, and NLRC4/NAIP act as bona fide pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that sense microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) but also react to endogenous danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs)...
August 2016: Microbiology Spectrum
Martin Böhland, Eugenia Kress, Matthias B Stope, Thomas Pufe, Simone C Tauber, Lars-Ove Brandenburg
Bacterial meningitis is - despite therapeutical progress during the last decades - still characterized by high mortality and severe permanent neurogical sequelae. The brain is protected from penetrating pathogens by both the blood-brain barrier and the innate immune system. Invading pathogens are recognized by so-called pattern recognition receptors including the Toll-like receptors (TLR) which are expressed by glial immune cells in the central nervous system. Among these, TLR2 is responsible for the detection of Gram-positive bacteria such as the meningitis-causing pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae...
October 15, 2016: Journal of Neuroimmunology
Hiroki Omura, Daisuke Oikawa, Takanori Nakane, Megumi Kato, Ryohei Ishii, Ryuichiro Ishitani, Fuminori Tokunaga, Osamu Nureki
In the innate immune system, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) specifically recognize ligands derived from bacteria or viruses, to trigger the responsible downstream pathways. DEAD box protein 41 (DDX41) is an intracellular PRR that triggers the downstream pathway involving the adapter STING, the kinase TBK1, and the transcription factor IRF3, to activate the type I interferon response. DDX41 is unique in that it recognizes two different ligands; i.e., double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and cyclic dinucleotides (CDN), via its DEAD domain...
October 10, 2016: Scientific Reports
Yajuan Li, Yuelong Li, Xiaocong Cao, Xiangyu Jin, Tengchuan Jin
Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and their signaling pathways have essential roles in recognizing various components of pathogens as well as damaged cells and triggering inflammatory responses that eliminate invading microorganisms and damaged cells. The zebrafish relies heavily on these primary defense mechanisms against pathogens. Here, we review the major PRR signaling pathways in the zebrafish innate immune system and compare these signaling pathways in zebrafish and humans to reveal their evolutionary relationship and better understand their innate immune defense mechanisms...
October 10, 2016: Cellular & Molecular Immunology
Melissa C Hanson, Darrell J Irvine
Molecular adjuvants based off of pattern recognition receptor agonists are capable of potently stimulating innate immunity and inducing protective immune responses to subunit antigens. One significant disadvantage to these small molecule adjuvants is their pharmacokinetic profile of entering the blood stream rather than the lymphatics after parental injection. In order to target molecular adjuvants to lymph nodes, we have developed nanoparticle carriers whose size has been optimized to avoid the blood and efficiently drain to lymph nodes (Hanson et al...
2017: Methods in Molecular Biology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"