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Adaptive immune system

Chun Gwon Park, Christina A Hartl, Daniela Schmid, Ellese M Carmona, Hye-Jung Kim, Michael S Goldberg
Cancer immunotherapy can confer durable benefit, but the percentage of patients who respond to this approach remains modest. The ability to concentrate immunostimulatory compounds at the site of disease can overcome local immune tolerance and reduce systemic toxicity. Surgical resection of tumors may improve the efficacy of immunotherapy by removing the concentrated immunosuppressive microenvironment; however, it also removes tumor-specific leukocytes as well as tumor antigens that may be important to establishing antitumor immunity...
March 21, 2018: Science Translational Medicine
Jerold Jeyaratnam, Nienke M Ter Haar, Helen J Lachmann, Ozgur Kasapcopur, Amanda K Ombrello, Donato Rigante, Fatma Dedeoglu, Ezgi H Baris, Sebastiaan J Vastert, Nico M Wulffraat, Joost Frenkel
BACKGROUND: Withholding live-attenuated vaccines in patients using interleukin (IL)-1 or IL-6 blocking agents is recommended by guidelines for both pediatric and adult rheumatic diseases, since there is a risk of infection in an immune suppressed host. However, this has never been studied. This retrospective, multicenter survey aimed to evaluate the safety of live-attenuated vaccines in patients using IL-1 or IL-6 blockade. METHODS: We contacted physicians involved in the treatment of autoinflammatory diseases to investigate potential cases...
March 21, 2018: Pediatric Rheumatology Online Journal
Seyma Katrinli, G Nilay Karatas Erkut, Kamil Ozdil, Feruze Yilmaz Enc, Oguzhan Ozturk, Resul Kahraman, Ilyas Tuncer, Gizem Dinler Doganay, Levent Doganay
AIM: Chronic hepatitis B (CHB) is a global health problem. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) exposed signifi-cant association between the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II region, including both DP and DQ loci, and chronic hepatitis B. Previous research also indicated the involvement of adaptive immune system in Hepatitis B seroconversion. The aim of this study is to investigate possible polymorphisms in the HLA-DP locus that can contribute to immune response to Hepatitis B virus (HBV)...
July 2017: Acta Gastro-enterologica Belgica
Diane E Griffin, Wen-Hsuan W Lin, Ashley N Nelson
Measles is an acute systemic viral disease with initial amplification of infection in lymphoid tissue and subsequent spread over 10-14 days to multiple organs. Failure of the innate response to control initial measles virus (MeV) replication is associated with the ability of MeV to inhibit the induction of type I interferon and interferon-stimulated antiviral genes. Rather, the innate response is characterized by the expression of proteins regulated by nuclear factor kappa B and the inflammasome. With eventual development of the adaptive response, the rash appears with immune cell infiltration into sites of virus replication to initiate the clearance of infectious virus...
2018: F1000Research
Petrus Linge, Paul R Fortin, Christian Lood, Anders A Bengtsson, Eric Boilard
Dysregulation of lymphocyte function, accumulation of autoantibodies and defective clearance of circulating immune complexes and apoptotic cells are hallmarks of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Moreover, it is now evident that an intricate interplay between the adaptive and innate immune systems contributes to the pathogenesis of SLE, ultimately resulting in chronic inflammation and organ damage. Platelets circulate in the blood and are chiefly recognized for their role in the prevention of bleeding and promotion of haemostasis; however, accumulating evidence points to a role for platelets in both adaptive and innate immunity...
March 21, 2018: Nature Reviews. Rheumatology
Jolanta Parada-Turska, Monika Turska
Polyarteritis nodosa is a systemic necrotizing vasculitis which predominantly affects medium-sized arteries. It is a rare disease nowadays. Both the nomenclature and the classification of polyarteritis nodosa was amended several times in the past. Currently, there is a distinction between the primary form described as classical polyarteritis nodosa and other forms that are associated with their probable cause e.g. with viral hepatitis B, C or HIV infection. Moreover, polyarteritis-like necrotizing vasculitis can appear in the course of genetic diseases caused by mutations in single genes...
2018: Wiadomości Lekarskie: Organ Polskiego Towarzystwa Lekarskiego
Kerri M Malone, Kévin Rue-Albrecht, David A Magee, Kevin Conlon, Olga T Schubert, Nicolas C Nalpas, John A Browne, Alicia Smyth, Eamonn Gormley, Ruedi Aebersold, David E MacHugh, Stephen V Gordon
Members of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) are the causative agents of tuberculosis in a range of mammals, including humans. A key feature of MTBC pathogens is their high degree of genetic identity yet distinct host tropism. Notably, while Mycobacterium bovis is highly virulent and pathogenic for cattle, the human pathogen M. tuberculosis is attenuated in cattle. Previous research also suggests that host preference amongst MTBC members has a basis in host innate immune responses. To explore MTBC host tropism, we present in-depth profiling of the MTBC reference strains M...
March 20, 2018: Microbial Genomics
Geoffrey Littlejohn, Emma Guymer
Fibromyalgia is a high impact chronic pain disorder with a well-defined and robust clinical phenotype. Key features include widespread pain and tenderness, high levels of sleep disturbance, fatigue, cognitive dysfunction and emotional distress. Abnormal processing of pain and other sensory input occurs in the brain, spinal cord and periphery and is related to the processes of central and peripheral sensitization. As such, fibromyalgia is deemed to be one of the central sensitivity syndromes. There is increasing evidence of neurogenically derived inflammatory mechanisms occurring in the peripheral tissues, spinal cord and brain in fibromyalgia...
March 19, 2018: Seminars in Immunopathology
Rachel V Jimenez, Tyler T Wright, Nicholas R Jones, Jianming Wu, Andrew W Gibson, Alexander J Szalai
C-reactive protein (CRP) is the prototypical acute phase reactant, increasing in blood concentration rapidly and several-fold in response to inflammation. Recent evidence indicates that CRP has an important physiological role even at low, baseline levels, or in the absence of overt inflammation. For example, we have shown that human CRP inhibits the progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in CRP transgenic mice by shifting CD4+ T cells away from the TH 1 and toward the TH 2 subset. Notably, this action required the inhibitory Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB), but did not require high levels of human CRP...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Xiaoyong Chen, Shasha Liu, Mohsan Ullah Goraya, Mohamed Maarouf, Shile Huang, Ji-Long Chen
Influenza A viruses (IAVs) are contagious pathogens responsible for severe respiratory infection in humans and animals worldwide. Upon detection of IAV infection, host immune system aims to defend against and clear the viral infection. Innate immune system is comprised of physical barriers (mucus and collectins), various phagocytic cells, group of cytokines, interferons (IFNs), and IFN-stimulated genes, which provide first line of defense against IAV infection. The adaptive immunity is mediated by B cells and T cells, characterized with antigen-specific memory cells, capturing and neutralizing the pathogen...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Martin F Flajnik
The adaptive immune system arose 500 million years ago in ectothermic (cold-blooded) vertebrates. Classically, the adaptive immune system has been defined by the presence of lymphocytes expressing recombination-activating gene (RAG)-dependent antigen receptors and the MHC. These features are found in all jawed vertebrates, including cartilaginous and bony fish, amphibians and reptiles and are most likely also found in the oldest class of jawed vertebrates, the extinct placoderms. However, with the discovery of an adaptive immune system in jawless fish based on an entirely different set of antigen receptors - the variable lymphocyte receptors - the divergence of T and B cells, and perhaps innate-like lymphocytes, goes back to the origin of all vertebrates...
March 19, 2018: Nature Reviews. Immunology
Arunkumar Krishnan, Lakshminarayan M Iyer, Stephen J Holland, Thomas Boehm, L Aravind
AID/APOBEC deaminases (AADs) convert cytidine to uridine in single-stranded nucleic acids. They are involved in numerous mutagenic processes, including those underpinning vertebrate innate and adaptive immunity. Using a multipronged sequence analysis strategy, we uncover several AADs across metazoa, dictyosteliida, and algae, including multiple previously unreported vertebrate clades, and versions from urochordates, nematodes, echinoderms, arthropods, lophotrochozoans, cnidarians, and porifera. Evolutionary analysis suggests a fundamental division of AADs early in metazoan evolution into secreted deaminases (SNADs) and classical AADs, followed by diversification into several clades driven by rapid-sequence evolution, gene loss, lineage-specific expansions, and lateral transfer to various algae...
March 19, 2018: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Philip B Greenspoon, Sydney Banton, Nicole Mideo
Predators may be limited in their ability to kill prey (i.e., have type II or III functional responses), an insight that has had far-reaching consequences in the ecological literature. With few exceptions, however, this possibility has not been extended to the behaviour of immune cells, which kill pathogens much as predators kill their prey. Rather, models of the within-host environment have tended to tacitly assume that immune cells have an unlimited ability to target and kill pathogens (i.e., a type I functional response)...
March 16, 2018: Journal of Theoretical Biology
Yuwei Zhu, Fan Zhang, Zhiwei Huang
A molecular arms race is progressively being unveiled between prokaryotes and viruses. Prokaryotes utilize CRISPR-mediated adaptive immune systems to kill the invading phages and mobile genetic elements, and in turn, the viruses evolve diverse anti-CRISPR proteins to fight back. The structures of several anti-CRISPR proteins have now been reported, and here we discuss their structural features, with a particular emphasis on topology, to discover their similarities and differences. We summarize the CRISPR-Cas inhibition mechanisms of these anti-CRISPR proteins in their structural context...
March 19, 2018: BMC Biology
Franziska Just, Michael Oster, Kirsten Büsing, Luisa Borgelt, Eduard Murani, Siriluck Ponsuksili, Petra Wolf, Klaus Wimmers
BACKGROUND: In monogastric animals, phosphorus (P) homeostasis is maintained by regulating intestinal absorption, bone mobilization, and renal excretion. Since P is a non-renewable resource, a shortage is imminent due to widespread over-usage in the farming and animal husbandry industries. As a consequence, P efficiency should be improved in pig production. We sought to characterize the transcriptional response in re-/absorbing and excreting tissues in pigs to diets varying in calcium: phosphorus ratios...
March 20, 2018: BMC Genomics
Qiyu Liu, Chong Lu, Wanjun Dai, Ke Li, Jing Xu, Yunke Huang, Guiling Li, Yu Kang, Anil K Sood, Congjian Xu
In order to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the biobehavioral factors responsible for cervical cancer from the perspective of lncRNAs. Tumor samples were obtained from patients with stage Ib-IIb squamous cervical cancer, which were divided into high- and low-risk groups according to biobehavioral risk factors. A lncRNA + mRNA microarray was performed, and the results were validated using qRT-PCR. Gene ontology (GO), pathway, and lncRNA-mRNA co-expression analysis were performed to predict the potential functions of the differentially expressed transcripts...
2018: Bioscience Trends
Jacob D Estes, Roger LeGrand, Constantinos Petrovas
Immunological inductive tissues, such as secondary lymphoid organs, are composed of distinct anatomical microenvironments for the generation of immune responses to pathogens and immunogens. These microenvironments are characterized by the compartmentalization of highly specialized immune and stromal cell populations, as well as the presence of a complex network of soluble factors and chemokines that direct the intra-tissue trafficking of naïve and effector cell populations. Imaging platforms have provided critical contextual information regarding the molecular and cellular interactions that orchestrate the spatial microanatomy of relevant cells and the development of immune responses against pathogens...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Cheng-Yu Liao, Hui-Wen Yu, Chao-Neng Cheng, Jiann-Shiuh Chen, Ching-Wei Lin, Peng-Chieh Chen, Chi-Chang Shieh
BACKGROUND: Patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), which is caused by genetic defects in immune-related genes involved in the development or activation of the adaptive immune system, often died in infancy due to severe infections before definite molecular diagnosis could be made. Although recent improvement in early diagnosis has been achieved by newborn screening, the genetic basis of many of the patients is still unknown. METHODS: Here we performed whole exome sequencing (WES) to investigate the underlying genetic causes of SCID in a proband identified with newborn screening...
March 2, 2018: Journal of Microbiology, Immunology, and Infection, Wei Mian Yu Gan Ran za Zhi
Silvana Konermann, Peter Lotfy, Nicholas J Brideau, Jennifer Oki, Maxim N Shokhirev, Patrick D Hsu
Class 2 CRISPR-Cas systems endow microbes with diverse mechanisms for adaptive immunity. Here, we analyzed prokaryotic genome and metagenome sequences to identify an uncharacterized family of RNA-guided, RNA-targeting CRISPR systems that we classify as type VI-D. Biochemical characterization and protein engineering of seven distinct orthologs generated a ribonuclease effector derived from Ruminococcus flavefaciens XPD3002 (CasRx) with robust activity in human cells. CasRx-mediated knockdown exhibits high efficiency and specificity relative to RNA interference across diverse endogenous transcripts...
March 8, 2018: Cell
Maria Bottermann, Leo C James
Innate immunity is traditionally thought of as the first line of defense against pathogens that enter the body. It is typically characterized as a rather weak defense mechanism, designed to restrict pathogen replication until the adaptive immune response generates a tailored response and eliminates the infectious agent. However, intensive research in recent years has resulted in better understanding of innate immunity as well as the discovery of many effector proteins, revealing its numerous powerful mechanisms to defend the host...
2018: Advances in Virus Research
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