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Microbiome of stomach

Kathryn P Haley, Jennifer A Gaddy
Helicobacter pylori colonizes the stomachs of greater than 50% of the world's human population making it arguably one of the most successful bacterial pathogens. Chronic H. pylori colonization results in gastritis in nearly all patients; however in a subset of people, persistent infection with H. pylori is associated with an increased risk for more severe disease outcomes including B-cell lymphoma of mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) and invasive adenocarcinoma. Research aimed at elucidating determinants that mediate disease progression has revealed genetic differences in both humans and H...
2016: Gastroenterology Research and Practice
Derek Fleming, Jennifer Kesey, Kendra Rumbaugh, Sharmila Dissanaike
BACKGROUND: Probiotics are widely used in healthy and nonhealthy individuals to maintain a favorable gut microbiome and inhibit pathogen takeover. Currently, there are many varieties of probiotic delivery vehicles on the market, with no real research indicating which is the most effective at allowing for colon colonization. In this study, we sought to determine if probiotic preparation influences the ability of Lactobacillus species, one of the most common genera of probiotic bacteria, to survive gastric acidity...
September 29, 2016: JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Anthony J Hannan
Is that a rumbling I feel in my stomach? Or perhaps it is the trillions of bacteria down there who are in revolt, fomenting (or fermenting!) a microbial revolution? No active biologist or medical researcher can easily ignore the revolution in gut microbiome research in recent years. It seems that the gut microbiome, the entire microbial ecosystem occupying the gastrointestinal ecological niche, can impact almost every organ in the human body, not least of which being the brain. The gut microbiome has been found to signal to both the developing and adult mammalian brain, modulating both health and disease states (Cryan and Dinan, 2012; Mayer et al...
September 13, 2016: European Journal of Neuroscience
Filipa Godoy-Vitorino, Arnold Rodriguez-Hilario, Ana Luísa Alves, Filipa Gonçalves, Beatriz Cabrera-Colon, Cristina Sousa Mesquita, Pedro Soares-Castro, Marisa Ferreira, Ana Marçalo, José Vingada, Catarina Eira, Pedro Miguel Santos
Infectious diseases with epizootic consequences have not been fully studied in marine mammals. Presently, the unprecedented depth of sequencing, made available by high-throughput approaches, allows detailed comparisons of the microbiome in health and disease. This is the first report of the striped dolphin microbiome in different body sites. Samples from one striped female edematous dolphin were acquired from a variety of body niches, including the blowhole, oral cavity, oral mucosa, tongue, stomach, intestines and genital mucosa...
September 9, 2016: Research in Microbiology
Lydia E Wroblewski, Richard M Peek, Lori A Coburn
Humans are host to complex microbial communities previously termed normal flora and largely overlooked. However, resident microbes contribute to both health and disease. Investigators are beginning to define microbes that contribute to the development of gastrointestinal malignancies and the mechanisms by which this occurs. Resident microbes can induce inflammation, leading to cell proliferation and altered stem cell dynamics, which can lead to alterations in DNA integrity and immune regulation and promote carcinogenesis...
September 2016: Gastroenterology Clinics of North America
Kevin D Kohl, M Denise Dearing
The microbial communities inhabiting the alimentary tracts of mammals, particularly those of herbivores, are estimated to be one of the densest microbial reservoirs on Earth. The significance of these gut microbes in influencing the physiology, ecology and evolution of their hosts is only beginning to be realized. To understand the microbiome of herbivores with a focus on nutritional ecology, while evaluating the roles of host evolution and environment in sculpting microbial diversity, we have developed an experimental system consisting of the microbial communities of several species of herbivorous woodrats (genus Neotoma) that naturally feed on a variety of dietary toxins...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Jessica J Eichmiller, Matthew J Hamilton, Christopher Staley, Michael J Sadowsky, Peter W Sorensen
BACKGROUND: Although the common, silver, and bighead carps are native and sparsely distributed in Eurasia, these fish have become abundant and invasive in North America. An understanding of the biology of these species may provide insights into sustainable control methods. The animal-associated microbiome plays an important role in host health. Characterization of the carp microbiome and the factors that affect its composition is an important step toward understanding the biology and interrelationships between these species and their environments...
2016: Microbiome
Tina J Hieken, Jun Chen, Tanya L Hoskin, Marina Walther-Antonio, Stephen Johnson, Sheri Ramaker, Jian Xiao, Derek C Radisky, Keith L Knutson, Krishna R Kalari, Janet Z Yao, Larry M Baddour, Nicholas Chia, Amy C Degnim
Globally breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women. The breast consists of epithelium, stroma and a mucosal immune system that make up a complex microenvironment. Growing awareness of the role of microbes in the microenvironment recently has led to a series of findings important for human health. The microbiome has been implicated in cancer development and progression at a variety of body sites including stomach, colon, liver, lung, and skin. In this study, we assessed breast tissue microbial signatures in intraoperatively obtained samples using 16S rDNA hypervariable tag sequencing...
2016: Scientific Reports
Nicola Basso, Emanuele Soricelli, Lidia Castagneto-Gissey, Giovanni Casella, Davide Albanese, Francesca Fava, Claudio Donati, Kieran Tuohy, Giulia Angelini, Federica La Neve, Anna Severino, Virginia Kamvissi-Lorenz, Andrea L Birkenfeld, Stefan Bornstein, Melania Manco, Geltrude Mingrone
Metabolic surgery improves insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes possibly because of weight loss. We performed a novel sleeve gastrectomy in rats that resects ∼80% of the glandular portion, leaving the forestomach almost intact (glandular gastrectomy [GG]) and compared subsequent metabolic remodeling with a sham operation. GG did not affect body weight, at least after 10 weeks; improved hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity likely through increased Akt, glycogen synthase kinase 3, and AMPK phosphorylation; and reduced ectopic fat deposition and hepatic glycogen overaccumulation...
October 2016: Diabetes
H Al-Momani, A Perry, C J Stewart, R Jones, A Krishnan, A G Robertson, S Bourke, S Doe, S P Cummings, A Anderson, T Forrest, S M Griffin, M Brodlie, J Pearson, C Ward
Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux (GOR) is a key problem in Cystic Fibrosis (CF), but the relationship between lung and gastric microbiomes is not well understood. We hypothesised that CF gastric and lung microbiomes are related. Gastric and sputum cultures were obtained from fifteen CF patients receiving percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy feeding. Non-CF gastric juice data was obtained through endoscopy from 14 patients without lung disease. Bacterial and fungal isolates were identified by culture. Molecular bacterial profiling used next generation sequencing (NGS) of the 16S rRNA gene...
2016: Scientific Reports
Christian Schulz, Kerstin Schütte, Peter Malfertheiner
The discovery of Helicobacter pylori changed the traditional view of the stomach as a hostile organ to bacterial survival. H. pylori induces chronic gastritis, which has the potential to progress to severe complications such as peptic ulcer disease and gastric neoplasia. The development of modern nucleotide sequencing techniques and new biocomputational tools allow the possibility of studying the diversity and complexity of the microbiome in the whole gastrointestinal (GI) tract and overcome the limitations of culturing techniques...
2016: Digestive Diseases
Cong He, Zhen Yang, Nonghua Lu
The development of new nucleotide sequencing techniques and advanced bioinformatics tools has opened the field for studying the diversity and complexity of the gastrointestinal microbiome independent of traditional cultural methods. Owing largely to the gastric acid barrier, the human stomach was long thought to be sterile. The discovery of Helicobacter pylori, the gram-negative bacterium that infects upwards of 50% of the global population, has started a major paradigm shift in our understanding of the stomach as an ecologic niche for bacteria...
October 2016: Helicobacter
Chao Zhang, Kyle Cleveland, Felice Schnoll-Sussman, Bridget McClure, Michelle Bigg, Prashant Thakkar, Nikolaus Schultz, Manish A Shah, Doron Betel
Identifying the microbiome composition from primary tissues directly affords an opportunity to study the causative relationships between the host microbiome and disease. However, this is challenging due the low abundance of microbial DNA relative to the host. We present a systematic evaluation of microbiome profiling directly from endoscopic biopsies by whole genome sequencing. We compared our methods with other approaches on datasets with previously identified microbial composition. We applied this approach to identify the microbiome from 27 stomach biopsies, and validated the presence of Helicobacter pylori by quantitative PCR...
2015: Genome Biology
Bárbara Rocha, Mariana Correia, Rui Barbosa, João Laranjinha
Dietary nitrate, from green-leafy vegetables, is reduced to nitrite in the oral cavity and to nitric oxide ((•)NO) in the stomach. Gut microbiota is raising a great deal of interest since it has been recognized to be crucial to maintain gastrointestinal (GI) and systemic welfare. Dysbiosis (altered gut flora) is associated with increased epithelial permeability, deficient mucus production and with the activation of inflammatory pathways. Here we investigate whether dietary nitrate rescues GI physiology during dysbiosis...
October 2014: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
R H Hunt, M Camilleri, S E Crowe, E M El-Omar, J G Fox, E J Kuipers, P Malfertheiner, K E L McColl, D M Pritchard, M Rugge, A Sonnenberg, K Sugano, J Tack
The stomach is traditionally regarded as a hollow muscular sac that initiates the second phase of digestion. Yet this simple view ignores the fact that it is the most sophisticated endocrine organ with unique physiology, biochemistry, immunology and microbiology. All ingested materials, including our nutrition, have to negotiate this organ first, and as such, the stomach is arguably the most important segment within the GI tract. The unique biological function of gastric acid secretion not only initiates the digestive process but also acts as a first line of defence against food-borne microbes...
October 2015: Gut
DeAnna E Beasley, Amanda M Koltz, Joanna E Lambert, Noah Fierer, Rob R Dunn
Gastric acidity is likely a key factor shaping the diversity and composition of microbial communities found in the vertebrate gut. We conducted a systematic review to test the hypothesis that a key role of the vertebrate stomach is to maintain the gut microbial community by filtering out novel microbial taxa before they pass into the intestines. We propose that species feeding either on carrion or on organisms that are close phylogenetic relatives should require the most restrictive filter (measured as high stomach acidity) as protection from foreign microbes...
2015: PloS One
Gerardo Nardone, Debora Compare
INTRODUCTION: Although long thought to be a sterile organ, due to its acid production, the human stomach holds a core microbiome. AIM: To provide an update of findings related to gastric microbiota and its link with gastric diseases. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review of the literature. RESULTS: The development of culture-independent methods facilitated the identification of many bacteria. Five major phyla have been detected in the stomach: Firmicutes, Bacteroidites, Actinobacteria, Fusobacteria and Proteobacteria...
June 2015: United European Gastroenterology Journal
Mina Bashir, Barbara Prietl, Martin Tauschmann, Selma I Mautner, Patrizia K Kump, Gerlies Treiber, Philipp Wurm, Gregor Gorkiewicz, Christoph Högenauer, Thomas R Pieber
PURPOSE: Vitamin D is well known for its effects on bone mineralisation but has also been attributed immunomodulatory properties. It positively influences human health, but in vivo data describing vitamin D effects on the human gut microbiome are missing. We aimed to investigate the effects of oral vitamin D3 supplementation on the human mucosa-associated and stool microbiome as well as CD8(+) T cells in healthy volunteers. METHODS: This was an interventional, open-label, pilot study...
June 2016: European Journal of Nutrition
Alevtina Gall, Jutta Fero, Connor McCoy, Brian C Claywell, Carissa A Sanchez, Patricia L Blount, Xiaohong Li, Thomas L Vaughan, Frederick A Matsen, Brian J Reid, Nina R Salama
BACKGROUND: The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) has increased nearly five-fold over the last four decades in the United States. Barrett's esophagus, the replacement of the normal squamous epithelial lining with a mucus-secreting columnar epithelium, is the only known precursor to EAC. Like other parts of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, the esophagus hosts a variety of bacteria and comparisons among published studies suggest bacterial communities in the stomach and esophagus differ...
2015: PloS One
Thomas Van Hecke, Els Vossen, Lieselot Y Hemeryck, Julie Vanden Bussche, Lynn Vanhaecke, Stefaan De Smet
Uncured and nitrite-cured pork were subjected, raw, cooked (65 °C, 15 min) or overcooked (90 °C, 30 min), to an in vitro digestion model, which includes mouth, stomach, duodenum, and colon phases. Heating of uncured meat resulted in a pronounced increase in lipid and protein oxidation products throughout digestion. Nitrite-curing had an antioxidant effect during digestion, but this effect disappeared when the meat was overcooked, resulting in up to ninefold higher 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal concentrations compared with digested nitrite-cured raw and cooked pork...
November 15, 2015: Food Chemistry
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