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"Low back pain" "accelerometer"

Flávia A Carvalho, Chris G Maher, Marcia R Franco, Priscila K Morelhão, Crystian B Oliveira, Fernanda G Silva, Rafael Z Pinto
OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of physical activity measures, derived from accelerometer and a self-reported questionnaire, with fear of movement in patients with chronic non-specific low back pain (LBP), and to investigate the association between disability and fear of movement in this population. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Outpatient physical therapy university clinics. PARTICIPANTS: Patients presenting with non-specific LBP of greater than 3 months duration...
October 3, 2016: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Shuhei Hishii, Nobuyuki Miyatake, Hiroyuki Nishi, Akihiko Katayama, Kazuhiro Uzike, Hiroo Hashimoto, Kiichi Koumoto
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare psychological distress between patients on chronic hemodialysis with and without chronic low back pain (CLBP). SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of 72 patients on chronic hemodialysis, aged 72.9 ± 10.8 years, were enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Psychological distress using the K6, questionnaire for CLBP, and physical activity using the tri-accelerometer were evaluated. RESULTS: Twenty-nine patients (40...
October 3, 2016: Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine
Marina B Pinheiro, Manuela L Ferreira, Kathryn Refshauge, John Hopper, Christopher G Maher, Jan Hartvigsen, Bart Koes, Markus Hübscher, Paulo H Ferreira
Low back pain (LBP) is a major health problem globally, but approaches to prevention are not yet clearly identified because modifiable risk factors are not well established. Although physical activity is one promising modifiable risk factor, it is still not known what types and doses of physical activity are protective or harmful for LBP. The aim of this study is to establish the feasibility of a definitive cohort study that will investigate the effects of different types and doses of physical activity on the risk of developing recurrent LBP while accounting for genetic factors...
October 2016: Twin Research and Human Genetics: the Official Journal of the International Society for Twin Studies
Julie Lagersted-Olsen, Birthe Lykke Thomsen, Andreas Holtermann, Karen Søgaard, Marie Birk Jørgensen
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this paper was to investigate if objectively measured daily duration of forward bending of the trunk increases the risk of the development or aggravation of low-back pain (LBP) over one year in a working blue-collar population by examining (i) the incidence rate of LBP among workers reporting no LBP at baseline, and (ii) the aggravation of LBP among workers reporting LBP at baseline. METHODS: Using data from the Danish Physical Activity Cohort with Objective Measurements (DPhacto), the study measured forward bending of the trunk (>60˚) at work (FBW) and during leisure time (FBL), diurnally with accelerometers, and LBP with one-year monthly self-reports among 682 blue-collar workers from 15 workplaces...
September 8, 2016: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health
Hanna Lotzke, Max Jakobsson, Helena Brisby, Annelie Gutke, Olle Hägg, Rob Smeets, Marlies den Hollander, Lars-Eric Olsson, Mari Lundberg
BACKGROUND: Following lumbar fusion surgery, a successful outcome is empirically linked to effective rehabilitation. While rehabilitation is typically postoperative, the phase before surgery - termed prehabilitation - is reportedly an ideal time to prepare the patient. There are presently no guidelines for prehabilitation before lumbar fusion surgery. Physical activity has well-known health benefits, and staying physically active despite pain is a major principle in non-pharmacological chronic low back pain treatment...
2016: BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Bridget Foley, Lina Engelen, Joanne Gale, Adrian Bauman, Martin Mackey
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an activity-based work (ABW) office environment on physical activity and sedentary behavior, work ability, and musculoskeletal discomfort. METHODS: Eighty-eight office workers trialed ABW for 4 weeks. Accelerometer and self-reported outcomes were measured at baseline, end-intervention, and follow-up. Data were analyzed using linear mixed models. RESULTS: Accelerometry measured sedentary time; sedentary breaks and step count did not significantly change from baseline to end-intervention (P = 0...
September 2016: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Andrea Schaller, Kevin Rudolf, Lea Dejonghe, Christopher Grieben, Ingo Froboese
Introduction. The aim of the present study was to determine the closeness of agreement between a self-reported and an objective measure of physical activity in low back pain patients and healthy controls. Beyond, influencing factors on overestimation were identified. Methods. 27 low back pain patients and 53 healthy controls wore an accelerometer (objective measure) for seven consecutive days and answered a questionnaire on physical activity (self-report) over the same period of time. Differences between self-reported and objective data were tested by Wilcoxon test...
2016: BioMed Research International
Crystian B Oliveira, Marcia R Franco, Christopher G Maher, Chung-Wei Christine Lin, Priscila K Morelhão, Amanda C Araujo, Ruben F Negrão Filho, Rafael Z Pinto
OBJECTIVE: To investigate if physical activity interventions increase objectively measured physical activity levels of patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain (e.g. osteoarthritis, low back pain) compared to no/minimal intervention. METHODS: We performed a systematic review with meta-analysis (Prospero registration CRD42014015363) searching the MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus and PEDro and the main clinical trial registers. Quasi- or randomized controlled trials investigating the effect of physical activity interventions on objectively measured physical activity levels (e...
April 25, 2016: Arthritis Care & Research
Camilla Munch Nielsen, Nidhi Gupta, Lisbeth E Knudsen, Andreas Holtermann
OBJECTIVES: This cross-sectional study investigated the association of objectively measured walking and standing still time at work with low back pain (LBP) intensity among blue-collar workers. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. METHODS: 187 workers attached two accelerometers for diurnal standing still and walking measurements, which were categorized using tertiles. Workers' self-reported LBP intensity (scale 0-9) was categorized into low (0-5) and high pain (6-9)...
March 11, 2016: Ergonomics
Morten Villumsen, Andreas Holtermann, Afshin Samani, Pascal Madeleine, Marie Birk Jørgensen
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the association between forward bending of the trunk and low-back pain intensity (LBPi) among blue-collar workers in Denmark as well as whether the level of social support modifies the association. METHODS: In total, 457 workers were included in the study. The forward bending of ≥ 30° was computed from accelerometer recordings for several consecutive days during work, categorized into long (highest tertile) and short-moderate (remaining tertiles) duration...
March 2016: Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment & Health
Yves Henchoz, Nicola Soldini, Nicolas Peyrot, Davide Malatesta
PURPOSE: Walking in patients with chronic low back pain (cLBP) is characterized by motor control adaptations as a protective strategy against further injury or pain. The purpose of this study was to compare the preferred walking speed, the biomechanical and the energetic parameters of walking at different speeds between patients with cLBP and healthy men individually matched for age, body mass and height. METHODS: Energy cost of walking was assessed with a breath-by-breath gas analyser; mechanical and spatiotemporal parameters of walking were computed using two inertial sensors equipped with a triaxial accelerometer and gyroscope and compared in 13 men with cLBP and 13 control men (CTR) during treadmill walking at standard (0...
November 2015: European Journal of Applied Physiology
Belinda J Lawford, Julie Walters, Katia Ferrar
OBJECTIVE: To establish the effectiveness of walking alone and walking compared to other non-pharmacological management methods to improve disability, quality of life, or function in adults with chronic low back pain. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of the following databases was undertaken: Medline, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, Pedro, SportDiscus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. The following keywords were used: 'back pain' or 'low back pain' or 'chronic low back pain' and 'walk*' or 'ambulation' or 'treadmill*' or 'pedometer*' or 'acceleromet*' or 'recreational' and 'disability' or 'quality of life' or 'function*'...
June 2016: Clinical Rehabilitation
Nidhi Gupta, Caroline Stordal Christiansen, David M Hallman, Mette Korshøj, Isabella Gomes Carneiro, Andreas Holtermann
BACKGROUND: Studies on the association between sitting time and low back pain (LBP) have found contrasting results. This may be due to the lack of objectively measured sitting time or because socioeconomic confounders were not considered in the analysis. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between objectively measured sitting time (daily total, and occupational and leisure-time periods) and LBP among blue-collar workers. METHODS: Two-hundred-and-one blue-collar workers wore two accelerometers (GT3X+ Actigraph) for up to four consecutive working days to obtain objective measures of sitting time, estimated via Acti4 software...
2015: PloS One
Marit G H Dekker-van Weering, Miriam M R Vollenbroek-Hutten, Hermie J Hermens
PURPOSE: The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the potential value of a new personalized activity-based feedback treatment. METHOD: A prognostic cohort study was carried out in the daily environment of the patients. Seventeen individuals with chronic lower back pain (CLBP) symptoms for >3 months were included. Patients were from the Netherlands, aged 18-65 years. Patients wore an accelerometer and a Personal Digital Assistant (PDA) for 15 d. Patients received continuous and time-related personalized feedback and were instructed to follow the activity pattern as displayed on the PDA...
2015: Disability and Rehabilitation
Corinne S Babiolakis, Jennifer L Kuk, Janessa D M Drake
Low back pain is highly prevalent in nurses. This study aimed to determine which physical fitness, physical activity (PA) and biomechanical characteristics most clearly distinguish between nurses with [recently injured (RInj)] and without [not recently injured (NRInj)] a recent back injury. Twenty-seven (8 RInj, 19 NRInj) female nurses completed questionnaires (pain, work, PA), physical fitness, biomechanical and low back discomfort measures, and wore an accelerometer for one work shift. Relative to NRInj nurses, RInj nurses exhibited reduced lumbopelvic control (41...
2015: Ergonomics
Yuriko Myoji, Kimie Fujita, Masaaki Mawatari, Yasuko Tabuchi
We evaluated nocturnal sleep-wake rhythms and subjective sleep quality on the first postoperative night compared with the preoperative night in 34 patients who had total hip arthroplasty (mean age: 61.9 years; 82.4% female) under spinal anaesthesia. We also examined secondary factors related to sleep disturbances after surgery. Patients wore an accelerometer (actigraph) during the preoperative period and the first postoperative night to track sleep-wake rhythms. Secondary end-points were postsurgical pain and low back pain...
December 2015: International Journal of Nursing Practice
Won-Gyu Yoo
[Purpose] This study examined the effects of a ball-backrest chair combined with an accelerometer on the pain and trunk muscle endurance of a computer worker with low-back pain (LBP). [Subject and Methods] A 36-year-old male with a flat back who complained of LBP at the L3-5 level was the subject. He used the ball-backrest chair when working at a computer for 1 week. [Results] After using the ball backrest, the trunk extensor and flexor muscle endurance times had increased compared with the baseline and the VAS score had decreased from 7 to 4...
March 2014: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
J J Collins, M W Whittle
During normal walking, repetitive impulsive forces are introduced into the musculo-skeletal system. At heelstrike, there is a sharp irregularity in the ground reaction force, known as the heelstrike transient. As a result of experimental evidence indicating possible correlations between impulse loading and joint degeneration, research interest in heelstrike transients has intensified. This paper outlines the nature of the heelstrike transient and the use of accelerometers and force platforms for skeletal transient investigation...
August 1989: Clinical Biomechanics
M Magnusson, M Pope, M Rostedt, T Hansson
UNLABELLED: Various studies have demonstrated a positive relationship between low back pain and driving of vehicles. Little work has been done to establish how posture or seat design can attenuate vibrations. By means of skeletally mounted accelerometers it was demonstrated that the inclination of the backrest has only a minor role in vibration attenuation in the 4-6 Hz range. RELEVANCE: The increasing evidence of a positive relationship between driving and low back pain emphasizes the need for ways to attenuate vibrations on the spine...
January 1993: Clinical Biomechanics
M A Lafortune, E M Hennig
Repetitive impact loadings of the musculoskeletal system have been linked to the development of osteoarthritis and low back pain. An important function of footwear is to attenuate foot-ground impacts. The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of footwear types upon the impact ground reaction forces and the transient stress waves transmitted up the lower limb. The results have shown that both transient stress waves and ground reaction forces are affected by footwear during walking. Furthermore, with harder midsoles footwear, higher shock was transmitted to the lower extremities...
August 1992: Clinical Biomechanics
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