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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29220570/neuromicrobiology-how-microbes-influence-the-brain
#1
Cesar de la Fuente-Nunez, Beatriz Torres Meneguetti, Octávio Luiz Franco, Timothy K Lu
We review here recent discoveries in the exciting new field of neuromicrobiology. This field encompasses the interactions between the microbiome and the central nervous system. The microbiome has a tremendous impact on human health. In particular, the gut microbiota may play a key role in many essential processes in health and disease via the activity of the gut-brain axis, possibly contributing to autism spectrum disorders, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, depression, and anxiety disorder. Gut microbes may also be involved in nociception, complex host behaviors, and brain development...
December 8, 2017: ACS Chemical Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29183720/contemporary-applications-of-fecal-microbiota-transplantation-to-treat-intestinal-diseases-in-humans
#2
REVIEW
Christopher Staley, Alexander Khoruts, Michael J Sadowsky
The intestinal microbiota comprise an important organ that plays a vital role in host digestion, development, energy maintenance, hemostasis, and immunity. Disruption of the gut microbial community due to diet, lifestyle, or antibiotic exposure increases susceptibility to chronic infection and disease. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) involves the transfer of gut microbiota from a healthy donor to a patient in order to restore normal diversity and function of the microbial community. This method has become a well established alternative therapy for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infection...
November 25, 2017: Archives of Medical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29171095/the-gastrointestinal-microbiome-a-review
#3
REVIEW
P C Barko, M A McMichael, K S Swanson, D A Williams
The gastrointestinal microbiome is a diverse consortium of bacteria, archaea, fungi, protozoa, and viruses that inhabit the gut of all mammals. Studies in humans and other mammals have implicated the microbiome in a range of physiologic processes that are vital to host health including energy homeostasis, metabolism, gut epithelial health, immunologic activity, and neurobehavioral development. The microbial genome confers metabolic capabilities exceeding those of the host organism alone, making the gut microbiome an active participant in host physiology...
November 24, 2017: Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29170940/association-of-autism-spectrum-disorders-and-inflammatory-bowel-disease
#4
Maunoo Lee, Jayasree Krishnamurthy, Apryl Susi, Carolyn Sullivan, Gregory H Gorman, Elizabeth Hisle-Gorman, Christine R Erdie-Lalena, Cade M Nylund
Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) both have multifactorial pathogenesis with an increasing number of studies demonstrating gut-brain associations. We aim to examine the association between ASD and IBD using strict classification criteria for IBD. We conducted a retrospective case-cohort study using records from the Military Health System database with IBD defined as having one encounter with an ICD-9-CM diagnostic code for IBD and at least one outpatient prescription dispensed for a medication to treat IBD...
November 23, 2017: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29166585/brain-immunity-gut-big-links-between-pregnancy-and-autism
#5
Myka L Estes, A Kimberley McAllister
Although dysregulation of brain, immune, and gut physiology during pregnancy have each been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders, whether and how these presumably distinct systems are linked to cause disease is unclear. Kim et al. (2017) and Shin Yim et al. (2017) identify a pathway to explain how these aspects of our physiology are deeply and inextricably connected.
November 21, 2017: Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29124056/microbial-therapeutics-designed-for-infant-health
#6
REVIEW
Claire Watkins, Catherine Stanton, C Anthony Ryan, R Paul Ross
Acknowledgment of the gut microbiome as a vital asset to health has led to multiple studies attempting to elucidate its mechanisms of action. During the first year of life, many factors can cause fluctuation in the developing gut microbiome. Host genetics, maternal health status, mode of delivery, gestational age, feeding regime, and perinatal antibiotic usage, are known factors which can influence the development of the infant gut microbiome. Thus, the microbiome of vaginally born, exclusively breastfed infants at term, with no previous exposure to antibiotics, either directly or indirectly from the mother, is to be considered the "gold standard...
2017: Frontiers in Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29122491/inflammation-and-autism-from-maternal-gut-to-fetal-brain
#7
Ivan Osokine, Adrian Erlebacher
Maternal immune activation (MIA) during pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of behavioral disorders in the offspring of affected mothers. Two recent studies highlight how maternal inflammation disrupts inhibitory interneuron networks and suggest that the maternal gut microbiome may be a contributing risk factor for MIA-induced behavioral abnormalities.
November 6, 2017: Trends in Molecular Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29102384/increased-stool-immunoglobulin-a-level-in-children-with-autism-spectrum-disorders
#8
Jiaxiu Zhou, Fusheng He, Feng Yang, Zheng Yang, Yingjun Xie, Shaoming Zhou, Jingwen Liang, Ruihuan Xu, Yan Wang, Hailiang Guo, Wenhao Zhou, Mingbang Wang
BACKGROUND: There are currently no effective treatments for the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). However, alleviating gastrointestinal (GI) problems, which are prevalent in ASD patients, can significantly improve the core symptoms of autism. Previous studies have associated GI disorders in ASD patients with abnormal gut microbiota, although few disease-related microorganisms have been identified. Considering that the gut microbiome affects the intestinal immune system and the patient's behavior, and that immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the main antibody secreted by intestinal immune cells, we investigated stool IgA content as a means of understanding the gut immune status of ASD patients...
October 25, 2017: Research in Developmental Disabilities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29093639/rapid-assessment-of-microbiota-changes-in-individuals-with-autism-spectrum-disorder-using-bacteria-derived-membrane-vesicles-in-urine
#9
Yunjin Lee, Jin-Young Park, Eun-Hwa Lee, Jinho Yang, Bo-Ri Jeong, Yoon-Keun Kim, Ju-Young Seoh, SoHyun Lee, Pyung-Lim Han, Eui-Jung Kim
Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have altered gut microbiota, which appears to regulate ASD symptoms via gut microbiota-brain interactions. Rapid assessment of gut microbiota profiles in ASD individuals in varying physiological contexts is important to understanding the role of the microbiota in regulating ASD symptoms. Microbiomes secrete extracellular membrane vesicles (EVs) to communicate with host cells and secreted EVs are widely distributed throughout the body including the blood and urine...
October 2017: Experimental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29090837/biological-plausibility-of-the-gut-brain-axis-in-autism
#10
Alex Vasquez
Organic abnormalities with neuroinflammatory and psychiatric consequences involving abnormal kynurenine and purine metabolism, neurotransmitter and cytokine imbalances, and altered levels of nutrients and metabolites are noted in autism, and many of these abnormalities-specifically including increased intestinal permeability, microbial metabolites, and heightened serum levels of endotoxin-originate from the gut.
November 1, 2017: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29072974/the-occurrence-of-antibodies-against-gluten-in-children-with-autism-spectrum-disorders-does-not-correlate-with-serological-markers-of-impaired-intestinal-permeability
#11
Jan Józefczuk, Ewa Konopka, Joanna Beata Bierła, Ilona Trojanowska, Agnieszka Sowińska, Rafał Czarnecki, Lucjan Sobol, Paweł Józefczuk, Weronika Surdy, Bożena Cukrowska
There is evidence that children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) display an increased immune reactivity against gluten, which is supposed to be the effect of intestinal barrier abnormalities. The aim of study was to evaluate the relation of antibody induced by gluten to zonulin and intestinal fatty acid binding proteins (I-FABP), that is, serological markers of an impaired gut barrier. The study included 77 patients with ASDs. Zonulin, I-FABP, celiac-specific antibodies, anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA), and antibodies against neural transglutaminase 6 (TG6) of immunoglobulin (Ig) A and IgG classes were detected in sera...
October 26, 2017: Journal of Medicinal Food
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29046233/association-among-gut-microbes-intestinal-physiology-and-autism
#12
Wei-Li Wu
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2017: EBioMedicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29031410/harnessing-gut-microbes-for-mental-health-getting-from-here-to-there
#13
REVIEW
Annadora J Bruce-Keller, J Michael Salbaum, Hans-Rudolf Berthoud
There has been an explosion of interest in the study of microorganisms inhabiting the gastrointestinal tract (gut microbiota) and their impact on host health and physiology. Accumulating data suggest that altered communication between gut microbiota and host systems could participate in disorders such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and autoimmune disorders as well as neuropsychiatric disorders, including autism, anxiety, and major depressive disorders. The conceptual development of the microbiome-gut-brain axis has facilitated understanding of the complex and bidirectional networks between gastrointestinal microbiota and their host, highlighting potential mechanisms through which this environment influences central nervous system physiology...
August 30, 2017: Biological Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29028817/mitochondrial-dysfunction-in-the-gastrointestinal-mucosa-of-children-with-autism-a-blinded-case-control-study
#14
Shannon Rose, Sirish C Bennuri, Katherine F Murray, Timothy Buie, Harland Winter, Richard Eugene Frye
Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are prevalent in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) but the pathophysiology is poorly understood. Imbalances in the enteric microbiome have been associated with ASD and can cause GI dysfunction potentially through disruption of mitochondrial function as microbiome metabolites modulate mitochondrial function and mitochondrial dysfunction is highly associated with GI symptoms. In this study, we compared mitochondrial function in rectal and cecum biopsies under the assumption that certain microbiome metabolites, such as butyrate and propionic acid, are more abundant in the cecum as compared to the rectum...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29023853/antibiotics-gut-microbiome-and-obesity
#15
Karen S W Leong, José G B Derraik, Paul L Hofman, Wayne S Cutfield
Antibiotics have been hailed by many as 'miracle drugs' that have been effectively treating infectious diseases for over a century, leading to a marked reduction in morbidity and mortality. However, with the increasing use of antibiotics, we are now faced not only with the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance, but also with a rising concern about potential long-term effects of antibiotics on human health, including the development of obesity. The obesity pandemic continues to increase, a problem that affects both adults and children alike...
October 12, 2017: Clinical Endocrinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29023380/the-gut-microbiome-feelings-of-the-brain-a-perspective-for-non-microbiologists
#16
REVIEW
Aaron Lerner, Sandra Neidhöfer, Torsten Matthias
Objectives: To comprehensively review the scientific knowledge on the gut-brain axis. Methods: Various publications on the gut-brain axis, until 31 July 2017, were screened using the Medline, Google, and Cochrane Library databases. The search was performed using the following keywords: "gut-brain axis", "gut-microbiota-brain axis", "nutrition microbiome/microbiota", "enteric nervous system", "enteric glial cells/network", "gut-brain pathways", "microbiome immune system", "microbiome neuroendocrine system" and "intestinal/gut/enteric neuropeptides"...
October 12, 2017: Microorganisms
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28966571/cross-talk-the-microbiota-and-neurodevelopmental-disorders
#17
REVIEW
John R Kelly, Chiara Minuto, John F Cryan, Gerard Clarke, Timothy G Dinan
Humans evolved within a microbial ecosystem resulting in an interlinked physiology. The gut microbiota can signal to the brain via the immune system, the vagus nerve or other host-microbe interactions facilitated by gut hormones, regulation of tryptophan metabolism and microbial metabolites such as short chain fatty acids (SCFA), to influence brain development, function and behavior. Emerging evidence suggests that the gut microbiota may play a role in shaping cognitive networks encompassing emotional and social domains in neurodevelopmental disorders...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28965876/microbiota-related-changes-in-bile-acid-tryptophan-metabolism-are-associated-with-gastrointestinal-dysfunction-in-a-mouse-model-of-autism
#18
Anna V Golubeva, Susan A Joyce, Gerard Moloney, Aurelijus Burokas, Eoin Sherwin, Silvia Arboleya, Ian Flynn, Dmitry Khochanskiy, Angela Moya-Pérez, Veronica Peterson, Kieran Rea, Kiera Murphy, Olga Makarova, Sergey Buravkov, Niall P Hyland, Catherine Stanton, Gerard Clarke, Cormac G M Gahan, Timothy G Dinan, John F Cryan
Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most prevalent neurodevelopmental conditions worldwide. There is growing awareness that ASD is highly comorbid with gastrointestinal distress and altered intestinal microbiome, and that host-microbiome interactions may contribute to the disease symptoms. However, the paucity of knowledge on gut-brain axis signaling in autism constitutes an obstacle to the development of precision microbiota-based therapeutics in ASD. To this end, we explored the interactions between intestinal microbiota, gut physiology and social behavior in a BTBR T+Itpr3tf/J mouse model of ASD...
October 2017: EBioMedicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28946927/food-and-the-gut-relevance-to-some-of-the-autisms
#19
Paul Whiteley
Complex, diverse and rarely appearing without comorbidity, the autism spectrum disorders continue to be a source of research interest. With core symptoms variably impacting on social communication skills, the traditional focus of many research efforts has centred on the brain and how genetic and environmental processes impact on brain structure, function and/or connectivity to account for various behavioural presentations. Alongside emerging ideas on autistic traits being present in various clinical states, the autisms, and the overrepresentation of several comorbid conditions impacting on quality of life, other research avenues have opened up...
September 26, 2017: Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28938872/effect-of-vitamin-a-supplementation-on-gut-microbiota-in-children-with-autism-spectrum-disorders-a-pilot-study
#20
Juan Liu, Xiao Liu, Xue-Qin Xiong, Ting Yang, Ting Cui, Na-Li Hou, Xi Lai, Shu Liu, Min Guo, Xiao-Hua Liang, Qian Cheng, Jie Chen, Ting-Yu Li
BACKGROUND: Dysbiosis of gut microbiota are commonly reported in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and may contribute to behavioral impairment. Vitamin A (VA) plays a role in regulation of gut microbiota. This study was performed to investigate the role of VA in the changes of gut microbiota and changes of autism functions in children with ASD. RESULTS: Sixty four, aged 1 to 8 years old children with ASD completed a 6-month follow-up study with VA intervention. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to assess plasma retinol levels...
September 22, 2017: BMC Microbiology
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