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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28636161/infinity-sperm-storage-the-gift-that-keeps-on-giving
#1
Gauthier Schang, Beatriz Fernandez-Fuertes, Samantha C Lean, Alexandra L Nguyen, Osvaldo Bogado Pascottini
Female Drosophila retain sperm for up to two weeks post-copulation in a network of storage organs includng the bursa, the seminal receptacle, and the spermathecae. This image shows the seminal receptacle of a Drosophila melanogaster female, 2-hrs post-copulation between a LHM (wild-type) female with a Protamine B (green), β-Tubulin (blue) fluorescently tagged male, whose sperm can be visualized within the female. This 'infinity' structure of the seminal receptacle resembles the tubular coil that allows for the storage of very long sperm relative to female body size -up to 20 times the length of the female in some Drosophila species...
June 21, 2017: Molecular Reproduction and Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28633424/three-dimensional-3d-heparg-spheroid-model-with-physiologically-relevant-xenobiotic-metabolism-competence-and-hepatocyte-functionality-for-liver-toxicity-screening
#2
Sreenivasa C Ramaiahgari, Suramya Waidyanatha, Darlene Dixon, Michael J DeVito, Richard S Paules, Stephen S Ferguson
Effective prediction of human responses to chemical and drug exposure is of critical importance in environmental toxicology research and drug development. While significant progress has been made to address this challenge using in vitro liver models, these approaches often fail due to inadequate tissue model functionality. Herein, we describe the development, optimization, and characterization of a novel three-dimensional (3D) spheroid model using differentiated HepaRG cells that achieve and maintain physiologically-relevant levels of xenobiotic metabolism (CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4/5)...
June 15, 2017: Toxicological Sciences: An Official Journal of the Society of Toxicology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28630896/the-gh-receptor-exon-3-deletion-is-a-marker-of-male-specific-exceptional-longevity-associated-with-increased-gh-sensitivity-and-taller-stature
#3
Danny Ben-Avraham, Diddahally R Govindaraju, Temuri Budagov, Delphine Fradin, Peter Durda, Bing Liu, Sandy Ott, Danielle Gutman, Lital Sharvit, Robert Kaplan, Pierre Bougnères, Alex Reiner, Alan R Shuldiner, Pinchas Cohen, Nir Barzilai, Gil Atzmon
Although both growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling were shown to regulate life span in lower organisms, the role of GH signaling in human longevity remains unclear. Because a GH receptor exon 3 deletion (d3-GHR) appears to modulate GH sensitivity in humans, we hypothesized that this polymorphism could play a role in human longevity. We report a linear increased prevalence of d3-GHR homozygosity with age in four independent cohorts of long-lived individuals: 841 participants [567 of the Longevity Genes Project (LGP) (8% increase; P = 0...
June 2017: Science Advances
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28627510/glycogen-controls-caenorhabditis-elegans-lifespan-and-resistance-to-oxidative-stress
#4
Ivan Gusarov, Bibhusita Pani, Laurent Gautier, Olga Smolentseva, Svetlana Eremina, Ilya Shamovsky, Olga Katkova-Zhukotskaya, Alexander Mironov, Evgeny Nudler
A high-sugar diet has been associated with reduced lifespan in organisms ranging from worms to mammals. However, the mechanisms underlying the harmful effects of glucose are poorly understood. Here we establish a causative relationship between endogenous glucose storage in the form of glycogen, resistance to oxidative stress and organismal aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. We find that glycogen accumulated on high dietary glucose limits C. elegans longevity. Glucose released from glycogen and used for NADPH/glutathione reduction renders nematodes and human hepatocytes more resistant against oxidative stress...
June 19, 2017: Nature Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28623006/a-longevity-study-with-enhancer-substances-selegiline-bpap-detected-an-unknown-tumor-manifestation-suppressing-regulation-in-rat-brain
#5
J Knoll, K Baghy, S Eckhardt, P Ferdinandy, M Garami, L G Harsing, P Hauser, Z Mervai, T Pocza, Z Schaff, D Schuler, I Miklya
AIMS: First proof to show that (-)-deprenyl/selegiline (DEP), the first selective inhibitor of MAO-B, later identified as the first β-phenylethylamine (PEA)-derived synthetic catecholaminergic activity enhancer (CAE) substance and (2R)-1-(1-benzofuran-2-yl)-N-propylpentane-2-amine (BPAP), the tryptamine-derived presently known most potent, selective, synthetic enhancer substance, are specific markers of unknown enhancer-sensitive brain regulations. MAIN METHODS: Longevity study disclosing the operation of tumor-manifestation-suppressing (TMS) regulation in rat brain...
June 13, 2017: Life Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28622501/microbiome-and-longevity-gut-microbes-send-signals-to-host-mitochondria
#6
Jan Gruber, Brian K Kennedy
The microbiome has emerged as a major determinant of the functioning of host organisms, affecting both health and disease. Here, Han et al. use the workhorse of aging research, C. elegans, to identify specific mechanisms by which gut bacteria influence mitochondrial dynamics and aging, a first step toward analogous manipulations to modulate human aging.
June 15, 2017: Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28617853/co-occurrence-of-viruses-and-mosquitoes-at-the-vectors-optimal-climate-range-an-underestimated-risk-to-temperate-regions
#7
Marcus S C Blagrove, Cyril Caminade, Elisabeth Waldmann, Elizabeth R Sutton, Maya Wardeh, Matthew Baylis
Mosquito-borne viruses have been estimated to cause over 100 million cases of human disease annually. Many methodologies have been developed to help identify areas most at risk from transmission of these viruses. However, generally, these methodologies focus predominantly on the effects of climate on either the vectors or the pathogens they spread, and do not consider the dynamic interaction between the optimal conditions for both vector and virus. Here, we use a new approach that considers the complex interplay between the optimal temperature for virus transmission, and the optimal climate for the mosquito vectors...
June 15, 2017: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28615329/physiological-properties-of-brain-machine-interface-input-signals
#8
Marc W Slutzky, Robert D Flint
Brain machine interfaces (BMIs), also called brain computer interfaces (BCIs), decode neural signals and use them to control some type of external device. Despite many experimental successes and terrific demonstrations in animals and humans, a high-performance, clinically-viable device has not yet been developed for widespread usage. There are many factors that impact clinical viability and BMI performance. Arguably the first of these is the selection of brain signals used to control BMIs. Here, we summarize the physiological characteristics and performance-including movement-related information, longevity, and stability-of multiple types of input signals that have been used in invasive BMIs to date...
June 14, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28610891/n-butyl-deoxynojirimycin-delays-motor-deficits-cerebellar-microgliosis-and-purkinje-cell-loss-in-a-mouse-model-of-mucolipidosis-type-iv
#9
Lauren C Boudewyn, Jakub Sikora, Ladislav Kuchar, Jana Ledvinova, Yulia Grishchuk, Shirley L Wang, Kostantin Dobrenis, Steven U Walkley
Mucolipidosis type IV (MLIV) is a lysosomal storage disease exhibiting progressive intellectual disability, motor impairment, and premature death. There is currently no cure or corrective treatment. The disease results from mutations in the gene encoding mucolipin-1, a transient receptor potential channel believed to play a key role in lysosomal calcium egress. Loss of mucolipin-1 and subsequent defects lead to a host of cellular aberrations, including accumulation of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) in neurons and other cell types, microgliosis and, as reported here, cerebellar Purkinje cell loss...
June 10, 2017: Neurobiology of Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28609463/uric-acid-an-important-antioxidant-contributing-to-survival-in-termites
#10
Eisuke Tasaki, Hiroki Sakurai, Masaru Nitao, Kenji Matsuura, Yoshihito Iuchi
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated spontaneously in all organisms and cause oxidative damage to biomolecules when present in excess. Accumulated oxidative damage accelerates aging; enhanced antioxidant capacity may be a positive factor for longevity. Recently, numerous studies of aging and longevity have been performed using short-lived animals, however, longevity mechanisms remain unknown. Here we show that a termite Reticulitermes speratus that is thought to be long-lived eusocial insect than other solitary insects uses large quantities of uric acid as an antioxidant against ROS...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28599250/evaluation-of-mir-15a-and-mir-16-1-as-prognostic-biomarkers-in-chronic-lymphocytic-leukemia
#11
REVIEW
Tatiane Vieira Braga, Fernanda Cristina Gontijo Evangelista, Lorena Caixeta Gomes, Sérgio Schusterschitz da Silva Araújo, Maria das Graças Carvalho, Adriano de Paula Sabino
Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a B lineage neoplasm, characterized by the accumulation of B lymphocytes of great longevity, and usually develops as a result of the inhibition of apoptosis. Clinical evolution is extremely variable amongst affected individuals with survival ranging from a few months in aggressive cases, to a few decades in cases of indolent CLL. The identification of new prognostic factors, apart from clinical staging, has been an important research topic aiming at a better understanding of CLL...
June 6, 2017: Biomedicine & Pharmacotherapy, Biomédecine & Pharmacothérapie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28598350/comparative-study-of-physico-chemical-parameters-of-drinking-water-from-some-longevity-and-non-longevity-areas-of-china
#12
Yajun Du, Kunli Luo, Rahib Hussain
There is an obvious regional longevity phenomenon in China and many longevity counties are located in South China. This study was carried out to find the characteristics of elemental contents of drinking water in longevity areas in South China and the differences to non-longevity areas in China. A total of 128 drinking water samples were collected from longevity areas in South China (n = 40), non-longevity areas in South China (n = 74) and non-longevity areas in North China (n = 14) and 46 parameters of water were determined or calculated...
June 2017: Journal of Water and Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28596784/indy-a-new-link-to-metabolic-regulation-in-animals-and-humans
#13
REVIEW
Blanka Rogina
The Indy (I'm Not Dead Yet) gene encodes the fly homolog of the mammalian SLC13A5 citrate transporter. Reduced expression of the Indy gene in flies and worms extends their longevity. INDY is expressed in the plasma membrane of metabolically active tissues. Decreased expression of Indy in worms, flies, mice, and rats alters metabolism in a manner similar to calorie restriction. Reducing INDY activity prevents weight gain in flies, worms, and mice, and counteracts the negative effects of age or a high fat diet on metabolism and insulin sensitivity...
2017: Frontiers in Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28595670/healthy-cognitive-ageing-in-the-lothian-birth-cohort-studies-marginal-gains-not-magic-bullet
#14
J Corley, S R Cox, I J Deary
In the face of shifting demographics and an increase in human longevity, it is important to examine carefully what is known about cognitive ageing, and to identify and promote possibly malleable lifestyle and health-related factors that might mitigate age-associated cognitive decline. The Lothian Birth Cohorts of 1921 (LBC1921, n = 550) and 1936 (LBC1936, n = 1091) are longitudinal studies of cognitive and brain ageing based in Scotland. Childhood IQ data are available for these participants, who were recruited in later life and then followed up regularly...
June 9, 2017: Psychological Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28579800/meat-and-nicotinamide-a-causal-role-in-human-evolution-history-and-demographics
#15
REVIEW
Adrian C Williams, Lisa J Hill
Hunting for meat was a critical step in all animal and human evolution. A key brain-trophic element in meat is vitamin B3 / nicotinamide. The supply of meat and nicotinamide steadily increased from the Cambrian origin of animal predators ratcheting ever larger brains. This culminated in the 3-million-year evolution of Homo sapiens and our overall demographic success. We view human evolution, recent history, and agricultural and demographic transitions in the light of meat and nicotinamide intake. A biochemical and immunological switch is highlighted that affects fertility in the 'de novo' tryptophan-to-kynurenine-nicotinamide 'immune tolerance' pathway...
2017: International Journal of Tryptophan Research: IJTR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28579605/aging-reversal-and-healthy-longevity-is-in-reach-dependence-on-mitochondrial-dna-heteroplasmy-as-a-key-molecular-target
#16
George B Stefano, Richard M Kream
Recent trends in biomedical research have highlighted the potential for effecting significant extensions in longevity with enhanced quality of life in aging human populations. Within this context, any proposed method to achieve enhanced life extension must include therapeutic approaches that draw upon essential biochemical and molecular regulatory processes found in relatively simple single cell organisms that are evolutionarily conserved within complex organ systems of higher animals. Current critical thinking has established the primacy of mitochondrial function in maintaining good health throughout plant and animal phyla...
June 5, 2017: Medical Science Monitor: International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28578695/sirt1-ameliorates-oxidative-stress-induced-neural-cell-death-and-is-down-regulated-in-parkinson-s-disease
#17
Preeti Singh, Peter S Hanson, Christopher M Morris
BACKGROUND: Sirtuins (SIRTs) are NAD(+) dependent lysine deacetylases which are conserved from bacteria to humans and have been associated with longevity and lifespan extension. SIRT1, the best studied mammalian SIRT is involved in many physiological and pathological processes and changes in SIRT1 have been implicated in neurodegenerative disorders, with SIRT1 having a suggested protective role in Parkinson's disease. In this study, we determined the effect of SIRT1 on cell survival and α-synuclein aggregate formation in SH-SY5Y cells following oxidative stress...
June 2, 2017: BMC Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28575157/sex-differences-in-aging-genomic-instability
#18
Kathleen E Fischer, Nicole C Riddle
Aging is characterized by decreasing physiological integration, reduced function, loss of resilience and increased risk of death. Paradoxically, although women live longer, they suffer greater morbidity particularly late in life. These sex differences in human lifespan and healthspan are consistently observed in all countries and during every era for which reliable data exist. While these differences are ubiquitous in humans, evidence of sex differences in longevity and health for other species is more equivocal...
June 2, 2017: Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28573416/the-budding-yeast-saccharomyces-cerevisiae-as-a-model-organism-possible-implications-for-gerontological-studies
#19
Tomasz Bilinski, Aneta Bylak, Renata Zadrag-Tecza
Experimental gerontology is based on the fundamental assumption that the aging process has a universal character and that the mechanisms of aging are well-conserved among living things. The consequence of this assumption is the use of various organisms, including unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as models in gerontology, and direct extrapolation of the conclusions drawn from the studies carried on these organisms to human beings. However, numerous arguments suggest that aging is not universal and its mechanisms are not conserved in a wide range of species...
June 1, 2017: Biogerontology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28567542/current-perspective-in-the-discovery-of-anti-aging-agents-from-natural-products
#20
REVIEW
Ai-Jun Ding, Shan-Qing Zheng, Xiao-Bing Huang, Ti-Kun Xing, Gui-Sheng Wu, Hua-Ying Sun, Shu-Hua Qi, Huai-Rong Luo
Aging is a process characterized by accumulating degenerative damages, resulting in the death of an organism ultimately. The main goal of aging research is to develop therapies that delay age-related diseases in human. Since signaling pathways in aging of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans), fruit flies and mice are evolutionarily conserved, compounds extending lifespan of them by intervening pathways of aging may be useful in treating age-related diseases in human. Natural products have special resource advantage and with few side effect...
May 31, 2017: Natural Products and Bioprospecting
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