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"Clostridium difficile" "prevention"

Jennifer L Kuntz, Jennifer M Baker, Patricia Kipnis, Sherian Xu Li, Vincent Liu, Yang Xie, Stephen Marcella, Gabriel J Escobar
BACKGROUND Considerable efforts have been dedicated to developing strategies to prevent and treat recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (rCDI); however, evidence of the impact of rCDI on patient healthcare utilization and outcomes is limited. OBJECTIVE To compare healthcare utilization and 1-year mortality among adults who had rCDI, nonrecurrent CDI, or no CDI. METHODS We performed a nested case-control study among adult Kaiser Foundation Health Plan members from September 1, 2001, through December 31, 2013...
October 20, 2016: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Xia Wu, Elena E Paskaleva, Krunal K Mehta, Jonathan S Dordick, Ravi S Kane
Bacterial lysins are potent antibacterial enzymes with potential applications in the treatment of bacterial infections. Some lysins lose activity in the growth media of target bacteria, and the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we use CD11, an autolysin of Clostridium difficile, as a model lysin to demonstrate that the inability of this enzyme to kill C. difficile in growth medium is not associated with inhibition of the enzyme activity by medium, or the modification of the cell wall peptidoglycan...
October 19, 2016: Scientific Reports
Mária Džunková, Giuseppe D'Auria, Hua Xu, Jun Huang, Yinghua Duan, Andrés Moya, Ciarán P Kelly, Xinhua Chen
Antibiotics have significant and long-lasting impacts on the intestinal microbiota and consequently reduce colonization resistance against Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). Standard therapy using antibiotics is associated with a high rate of disease recurrence, highlighting the need for novel treatment strategies that target toxins, the major virulence factors, rather than the organism itself. Human monoclonal antibodies MK-3415A (actoxumab-bezlotoxumab) to C. difficile toxin A and toxin B, as an emerging non-antibiotic approach, significantly reduced the recurrence of CDI in animal models and human clinical trials...
2016: Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology
Alessandro Cassini, Diamantis Plachouras, Tim Eckmanns, Muna Abu Sin, Hans-Peter Blank, Tanja Ducomble, Sebastian Haller, Thomas Harder, Anja Klingeberg, Madlen Sixtensson, Edward Velasco, Bettina Weiß, Piotr Kramarz, Dominique L Monnet, Mirjam E Kretzschmar, Carl Suetens
BACKGROUND: Estimating the burden of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) compared to other communicable diseases is an ongoing challenge given the need for good quality data on the incidence of these infections and the involved comorbidities. Based on the methodology of the Burden of Communicable Diseases in Europe (BCoDE) project and 2011-2012 data from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) point prevalence survey (PPS) of HAIs and antimicrobial use in European acute care hospitals, we estimated the burden of six common HAIs...
October 2016: PLoS Medicine
Robert J Gianotti, Alan C Moss
Clostridium difficile (CD) is an anaerobic, spore-forming bacillus that is responsible for a spectrum of gastrointestinal illness ranging from asymptomatic carriage to toxic megacolon and death. The prevalence of CD infection is increasing in both hospitalized and community-based inflammatory bowel disease populations. Standard antibiotic therapy fails to cure or prevent recurrence in more than 50% of patients, thus increasing the need for alternative therapies. Recently, fecal microbiota transplantation has received renewed attention as a therapy for refractory or recurrent CD infection...
November 2016: Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Jessica Martin, Mark Wilcox
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Clostridium difficile infection has attained high prominence given its prevalence and impacts on patients and healthcare institutions. Multiple new approaches to the prevention and treatment of C. difficile infection (CDI) are undergoing clinical trials. RECENT FINDINGS: Bezlotoxumab is a monoclonal antibody against toxin B that has successfully completed phase III studies, demonstrating a significant reduction in recurrent CDI when given with standard of care antibiotics...
October 7, 2016: Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases
Emily S Starn, Holly Hampe, Thomas Cline
Health care facility-acquired Clostridium difficile infections (HCFA-CDI) have increased over the last several decades despite facilities developing protocols for prescribing probiotics with antibiotics to prevent HCFA-CDI. The literature does not consistently support this. A retrospective medical record review evaluated the care effectiveness of this practice. Care effectiveness was not found; patients receiving probiotics with antibiotics were twice as likely to develop HCFA-CDI (P = .004). Except with glycopeptides, patients were 1...
October 2016: Quality Management in Health Care
S D Stites, C A Cooblall, J Aronovitz, S B Singletary, K Micklow, M Sjeime
BACKGROUND: The incidence and severity of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) have increased in recent years. Predictive models may help to identify at-risk patients before the onset of infection. Early identification of high-risk patients could help antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programmes and other initiatives to better prevent C. difficile in these patients. AIM: To develop a predictive model that identifies patients at high risk for CDI at the time of hospitalization...
August 24, 2016: Journal of Hospital Infection
Abdel-Naser Elzouki
Probiotics are live, nonpathogenic bacteria capable of colonizing the colonic mucosa. The most common probiotics include strains of Lactobacillus or Bifidobacteria, which are part of the normal gastrointestinal microbiota. Initial studies of selected probiotic species have suggested potential efficacy in several gastrointestinal diseases including inflammatory bowel diseases (particularly pouchitis), antibiotic-related diarrhea, Clostridium difficile toxin-induced colitis, infectious diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, and allergy...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Giovanni Gasbarrini, Fiorenza Bonvicini, Annagiulia Gramenzi
Gut microbiota promotes healthy effects on the host and prevents diseases. Probiotic (probios, for life) are defined as "live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host." At the beginning of 1900s Louis Pasteur identified the microorganisms responsible for the process of fermentation, whereas E. Metchnikoff associated the enhanced longevity of Bulgarian rural people to the regular consumption of fermented dairy products such as yogurt. He suggested that lactobacilli might counteract the putrefactive effects of gastrointestinal metabolism that contributed to illness and aging...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Leonie Schnell, Ann-Katrin Mittler, Andrea Mattarei, Domenico Azarnia Tehran, Cesare Montecucco, Holger Barth
Diphtheria toxin is a single-chain protein toxin that invades human cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis. In acidic endosomes, its translocation domain inserts into endosomal membranes and facilitates the transport of the catalytic domain (DTA) from endosomal lumen into the host cell cytosol. Here, DTA ADP-ribosylates elongation factor 2 inhibits protein synthesis and leads to cell death. The compound 4-bromobenzaldehyde N-(2,6-dimethylphenyl)semicarbazone (EGA) has been previously shown to protect cells from various bacterial protein toxins which deliver their enzymatic subunits from acidic endosomes to the cytosol, including Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin and the binary clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins C2, iota and Clostridium difficile binary toxin (CDT)...
July 15, 2016: Toxins
Esther van Kleef, Sarah R Deeny, Mark Jit, Barry Cookson, Simon D Goldenberg, W John Edmunds, Julie V Robotham
BACKGROUND: Early clinical trials of a Clostridium difficile toxoid vaccine show efficacy in preventing C. difficile infection (CDI). The optimal patient group to target for vaccination programmes remains unexplored. This study performed a model-based evaluation of the effectiveness of different CDI vaccination strategies, within the context of existing infection prevention and control strategies such as antimicrobial stewardship. METHODS: An individual-based transmission model of CDI in a high-risk hospital setting was developed...
October 7, 2016: Vaccine
Heike Stier, Stephan C Bischoff
BACKGROUND: The probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii CNCM I-745 (also known as Saccharomyces cerevisiae HANSEN CBS 5926; in the following S. boulardii) has proven its effectiveness in preventive and therapeutic treatment of many gastrointestinal diseases, especially diseases associated with acute diarrhea. In particular, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, traveller's diarrhea, as well as acute diarrhea due to common viral and bacterial infections in children and adults...
2016: Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology
Costi D Sifri, Gene H Burke, Kyle B Enfield
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of copper-impregnated composite hard surfaces and linens in an acute care hospital to reduce health care-associated infections (HAIs). METHODS: We performed a quasiexperimental study with a control group, assessing development of HAIs due to multidrug resistant organisms (MDROs) and Clostridium difficile in the acute care units of a community hospital following the replacement of a 1970s-era clinical wing with a new wing outfitted with copper-impregnated composite hard surfaces and linens...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Infection Control
Yvette H van Beurden, Tom van Gils, Nienke A van Gils, Zain Kassam, Chris J J Mulder, Nieves Aparicio-Pagés
Treatment of refractory celiac disease type II (RCD II) and preventing the development of an enteropathy associated T-cell lymphoma in these patients is still difficult. In this case report, we describe a patient with RCD II who received fecal microbiota transfer as treatment for a recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, and remarkably showed a full recovery of duodenal villi and disappearance of celiac symptoms. This case suggests that altering the gut microbiota may hold promise in improving the clinical and histological consequences of celiac disease and/or RCD II...
September 2016: Journal of Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases: JGLD
Liang Tao, Jie Zhang, Paul Meraner, Alessio Tovaglieri, Xiaoqian Wu, Ralf Gerhard, Xinjun Zhang, William B Stallcup, Ji Miao, Xi He, Julian G Hurdle, David T Breault, Abraham L Brass, Min Dong
Clostridium difficile toxin B (TcdB) is a critical virulence factor that causes diseases associated with C. difficile infection. Here we carried out CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome-wide screens and identified the members of the Wnt receptor frizzled family (FZDs) as TcdB receptors. TcdB binds to the conserved Wnt-binding site known as the cysteine-rich domain (CRD), with the highest affinity towards FZD1, 2 and 7. TcdB competes with Wnt for binding to FZDs, and its binding blocks Wnt signalling. FZD1/2/7 triple-knockout cells are highly resistant to TcdB, and recombinant FZD2-CRD prevented TcdB binding to the colonic epithelium...
September 28, 2016: Nature
Christian Eckmann, Sue Lyon
26th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID), 9-12th April 2016, Amsterdam, The Netherlands The European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) is the annual scientific meeting of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology. ECCMID 2016, held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, was attended by over 11,600 clinical microbiologists and infectious disease physicians from more than 120 countries. The Congress offered an essential opportunity to learn more about the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of healthcare-associated infections, especially those caused by Clostridium difficile...
October 2016: Future Microbiology
Vanessa Arriola, Jessica Tischendorf, Jackson Musuuza, Anna Barker, Jeffrey W Rozelle, Nasia Safdar
BACKGROUND Clostridium difficile is the principal infectious cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea and accounts for 12% of hospital-acquired infections. Recent literature has shown an increased risk of C. difficile infection (CDI) with proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use. OBJECTIVE To conduct a systematic assessment of the risk of hospital-acquired CDI following exposure to PPI. METHODS We searched multiple databases for studies examining the relationship between PPI and hospital-acquired CDI. Pooled odds ratios were generated and assessment for heterogeneity performed...
September 28, 2016: Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
Christopher C Cooper, Robin L P Jump, Teena Chopra
Clostridium difficile is one of the foremost nosocomial pathogens. Preventing infection is particularly challenging. Effective prevention efforts typically require a multifaceted bundled approach. A variety of infection control procedures may be advantageous, including strict hand decontamination with soap and water, contact precautions, and using chlorine-containing decontamination agents. Additionally, risk factor reduction can help reduce the burden of disease. The risk factor modification is principally accomplished though antibiotic stewardship programs...
September 19, 2016: Infectious Disease Clinics of North America
Yaara Leibovici-Weissman, Alaa Atamna, Agata Schlesinger, Noa Eliakim-Raz, Jihad Bishara, Dafna Yahav
AIM: Most cases of Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) occur in patients aged 65 years and older. Older age is associated with increased mortality. Risk factors for mortality in patients aged 80 years and older are not well recognized. METHODS: We analyzed retrospective data including 184 patients aged 80 years and older hospitalized with CDI during 2009-2014. We aimed to delineate risk factors for short- and long-term mortality. RESULTS: The 30-day mortality was 33...
September 20, 2016: Geriatrics & Gerontology International
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