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Chen Wang, Chengcheng Xu, Jinxin Xia, Zhendong Qian
OBJECTIVES: This paper aims to model fault in e-bike fatal crashes in a county-level city in China. METHOD: Three-year crash data are retrieved from the crash reports (2012-2014) from the Taixing Police Department. A mixed logit models is introduced to explore significant factors associated with fault assignment, as well as accounting for similarity among fault assignment and heterogeneity within unobserved variables. RESULTS: The modeling results indicate some interesting new findings...
October 20, 2016: Traffic Injury Prevention
Anne T McCartt, Wen Hu
OBJECTIVES: During the past two decades, there have been large increases in mean horsepower and the mean horsepower-to-vehicle-weight ratio for all types of new passenger vehicles in the United States. This study examined the relationship between travel speeds and vehicle power, defined as horsepower per 100 pounds of vehicle weight. METHODS: Speed cameras measured travel speeds and photographed license plates and drivers of passenger vehicles traveling on roadways in Northern Virginia during daytime off-peak hours in spring 2013...
October 18, 2016: Traffic Injury Prevention
Lynn Babcock, Cody S Olsen, David M Jaffe, Julie C Leonard
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to ascertain potential factors associated with cervical spine injuries in children injured during sports and recreational activities. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis of a multicenter retrospective case-control study involving children younger than 16 years who presented to emergency departments after blunt trauma and underwent cervical spine radiography. Cases had cervical spine injury from sports or recreational activities (n = 179)...
September 30, 2016: Pediatric Emergency Care
Jagnoor Jagnoor, Annelies De Wolf, Michael Nicholas, Chris G Maher, Petrina Casey, Fiona Blyth, Ian A Harris, Ian D Cameron
BACKGROUND: We sought to identify the role of pre-injury socio-demographic and health characteristics, and injury severity in determining health-related quality-of-life outcomes for mild to moderate injuries 2 months after a motor vehicle crash in a compensable setting. METHODS: People aged 17 years and older, injured with a New Injury Severity Score of 8 or less, in a motor vehicle crash in New South Wales and who had registered a claim with the Compulsory Third Party Insurance scheme from March to December 2010 were contacted to participate in the study...
December 2015: Injury Epidemiology
Eli Raneses, Joyce C Pressley
BACKGROUND: Recent efforts to pass rear seat belt laws for adults have been hampered by large gaps in the scientific literature. This study examines driver, vehicle, crash, and passenger characteristics associated with mortality in rear-seated adult passengers. METHODS: The Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) 2010 to 2011 was used to examine motor vehicle occupant mortality in rear-seated adult passengers 18 years and older. Side crash vehicle safety ratings were assessed in a subset analysis of vehicles struck on the same side as the rear-seated passenger...
December 2015: Injury Epidemiology
Chang Liu, Joyce C Pressley
BACKGROUND: Most studies of rear-seated occupants have focused on or included pediatric occupants which may not translate to adults. This study examines passenger, driver, vehicle and crash characteristics for rear-seated adult occupants involved in side crashes. METHODS: The National Automotive Sampling System General Estimates System (NASS/GES) for calendar years 2011-2014 was used with accompanying weights to examine the occupant, vehicle and crash characteristics associated with injury in rear-seated adults (n = 395,504) involved in a side crash...
December 2016: Injury Epidemiology
Victor Puac-Polanco, Katherine M Keyes, Guohua Li
BACKGROUND: Motorcyclists are known to be at substantially higher risk per mile traveled of dying from crashes than car occupants. In 2014, motorcycling made up less than 1 % of person-miles traveled but 13 % of the total mortality from motor-vehicle crashes in the United States. We assessed the cohort effect of the baby-boomers (i.e., those born between 1946 and 1964) in motorcycle crash mortality from 1975 to 2014 in the United States. METHODS: Using mortality data for motorcycle occupants from the Fatality Analysis Reporting System, we performed an age-period-cohort analysis using the multiphase method and the intrinsic estimator method...
December 2016: Injury Epidemiology
Chang Liu, Yanlan Huang, Joyce C Pressley
BACKGROUND: While driving impaired is a well-recognized risk factor for motor vehicle (MV) crash, recent trends in recreational drug use and abuse may pose increased threats to occupant safety. This study examines mechanisms through which drug and/or alcohol combinations contribute to fatal MV crash. METHODS: The Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) for 2008-2013 was used to examine drugs, alcohol, driver restraint use, driver violations/errors and other behaviors of drivers of passenger vehicles who were tested for both alcohol and drugs (n = 79,932)...
December 2016: Injury Epidemiology
Cody S Olsen, Andrea M Thomas, Michael Singleton, Anna M Gaichas, Tracy J Smith, Gary A Smith, Justin Peng, Michael J Bauer, Ming Qu, Denise Yeager, Timothy Kerns, Cynthia Burch, Lawrence J Cook
BACKGROUND: Despite evidence that motorcycle helmets reduce morbidity and mortality, helmet laws and rates of helmet use vary by state in the U.S. METHODS: We pooled data from eleven states: five with universal laws requiring all motorcyclists to wear a helmet, and six with partial laws requiring only a subset of motorcyclists to wear a helmet. Data were combined in the Crash Outcome Data Evaluation System's General Use Model and included motorcycle crash records probabilistically linked to emergency department and inpatient discharges for years 2005-2008...
December 2016: Injury Epidemiology
Regan W Bergmark, Emily Gliklich, Rong Guo, Richard E Gliklich
BACKGROUND: Texting while driving and other cell-phone reading and writing activities are high-risk activities associated with motor vehicle collisions and mortality. This paper describes the development and preliminary evaluation of the Distracted Driving Survey (DDS) and score. METHODS: Survey questions were developed by a research team using semi-structured interviews, pilot-tested, and evaluated in young drivers for validity and reliability. Questions focused on texting while driving and use of email, social media, and maps on cellular phones with specific questions about the driving speeds at which these activities are performed...
December 2016: Injury Epidemiology
Allison E Curry, Melissa R Pfeiffer, Michael R Elliott
INTRODUCTION: Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) is the most effective strategy to reduce the burden of young driver crashes, but the extent to which young intermediate (newly licensed) drivers comply with, and police enforce, important GDL passenger and night-time restrictions is largely unknown. Population-level rates of intermediate drivers' compliance were estimated as well as police enforcement among crash-involved drivers who were noncompliant. METHODS: New Jersey's statewide driver licensing and crash databases were individually linked...
October 5, 2016: American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Yusuke Yamani, William J Horrey, Yulan Liang, Donald L Fisher
Older drivers are at increased risk of intersection crashes. Previous work found that older drivers execute less frequent glances for detecting potential threats at intersections than middle-aged drivers. Yet, earlier work has also shown that an active training program doubled the frequency of these glances among older drivers, suggesting that these effects are not necessarily due to age-related functional declines. In light of findings, the current study sought to explore the ability of older drivers to coordinate their head and eye movements while simultaneously steering the vehicle as well as their glance behavior at intersections...
2016: PloS One
Juliana Nichterwitz Scherer, Roberta Silvestrin, Felipe Ornell, Vinícius Roglio, Tanara Rosangela Vieira Sousa
BACKGROUND: Substance use disorders are associated with the increased risk of driving under the influence (DUI), but little is known about crack-cocaine and its relationship with road traffic crashes (RTC). METHOD: A multicenter sample of 765 crack-cocaine users was recruited in six Brazilian capitals in order to estimate the prevalence of DUI and RTC involvement. Legal, psychiatric, and drug-use aspects related with traffic safety were evaluated using the Addiction Severity Index - 6th version (ASI-6) and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview...
October 1, 2016: Drug and Alcohol Dependence
Bamini Gopinath, Jagnoor Jagnoor, Ian A Harris, Michael Nicholas, Petrina Casey, Fiona Blyth, Christopher G Maher, Ian D Cameron
OBJECTIVES: A better understanding of the long-term factors that independently predict poorer quality of life following mild to moderate musculoskeletal injuries is needed. We aimed to establish the predictors of quality of life (including, socio-demographic, health, psychosocial and pre-injury factors), 24 months after a non-catastrophic road-traffic injury. METHODS: Prospective cohort study of 252 participants with mild/ moderate injury sustained in a road traffic crash, had quality of life measured 24 months following baseline survey...
October 13, 2016: Traffic Injury Prevention
Meike J Wittmann, Hanna Stuis, Dirk Metzler
1.It is now widely accepted that genetic processes such as inbreeding depression and loss of genetic variation can increase the extinction risk of small populations. However, it is generally unclear whether extinction risk from genetic causes gradually increases with decreasing population size or whether there is a sharp transition around a specific threshold population size. In the ecological literature, such threshold phenomena are called "strong Allee effects" and they can arise for example from mate limitation in small populations...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Animal Ecology
Samantha L Schoell, Andrea N Doud, Ashley A Weaver, Jennifer W Talton, Ryan T Barnard, James E Winslow, Joel D Stitzel
BACKGROUND: Occult injuries are not easily detected and can be potentially life-threatening. The purpose of this study was to quantify the perceived occultness of the most frequent motor vehicle crash injuries according to emergency medical services (EMS) professionals. STUDY DESIGN: An electronic survey was distributed to 1,125 EMS professionals who were asked to quantify the likelihood that first responders would miss symptoms related to a particular injury on a 5-point Likert scale...
October 7, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Rashmi P Payyanadan, Adam Maus, Fabrizzio A Sanchez, John D Lee, Lillian Miossi, Amsale Abera, Jacob Melvin, Xufan Wang
To reduce exposure to risky and challenging driving situations and prolong mobility and independence, older drivers self-regulate their driving behavior. But self-regulation can be challenging because it depends on drivers' ability to assess their limitations. Studies using self-reports, survey data, and hazard and risk perception tests have shown that driving behavior feedback can help older drivers assess their limitations and adjust their driving behavior. But only limited work has been conducted in developing feedback technology interventions tailored to meet the information needs of older drivers, and the impact these interventions have in helping older drivers self-monitor their driving behavior and risk outcomes...
October 6, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Courtney Coughenour, Sheila Clark, Ashok Singh, Eudora Claw, James Abelar, Joshua Huebner
INTRODUCTION: In the US people of color are disproportionately affected by pedestrian crashes. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential for racial bias in driver yielding behaviors at midblock crosswalks in low and high income neighborhoods located in the sprawling metropolitan area of Las Vegas, NV. METHODS: Participants (1 white, 1 black female) crossed at a midblock crosswalk on a multilane road in a low income and a high income neighborhood. Trained observers recorded (1) number of cars that passed in the nearest lane before yielding while the pedestrian waited near the crosswalk at the curb (2) number of cars that passed through the crosswalk with the pedestrian in the same half of the roadway...
October 4, 2016: Accident; Analysis and Prevention
Ali Khorshidi, Elaheh Ainy, Seyed Saeed Hashemi Nazari, Hamid Soori
BACKGROUND: Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are the main causes of death and disability in Iran. However, very few studies about the temporal variations of RTIs have been published to date. OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to investigate the temporal pattern of RTIs in Iran in 2012. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All road traffic accidents (RTAs) reported to traffic police during a one-year period (March 21, 2012 through March 21, 2013) were investigated after obtaining permission from the law enforcement force of the Islamic Republic of Iran...
June 2016: Archives of Trauma Research
M Kit Delgado, Kathryn J Wanner, Catherine McDonald
Motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of death in adolescents, and drivers aged 16-19 are the most likely to die in distracted driving crashes. This paper provides an overview of the literature on adolescent cellphone use while driving, focusing on the crash risk, incidence, risk factors for engagement, and the effectiveness of current mitigation strategies. We conclude by discussing promising future approaches to prevent crashes related to cellphone use in adolescents. Handheld manipulation of the phone while driving has been shown to have a 3 to 4-fold increased risk of a near crash or crash, and eye glance duration greater than 2 seconds increases crash risk exponentially...
June 16, 2016: Media Commun
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