Read by QxMD icon Read

Antibiotic and fever in children

Yu Mi Seo, Seok Hwang-Bo, Seong Koo Kim, Seung Beom Han, Nack-Gyun Chung, Jin Han Kang
BACKGROUND: Although adenovirus (ADV) infection usually causes self-limiting respiratory disorders in immune competent children; severe and systemic ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy for leukemia has been continuously reported. Nevertheless, there has been no consensus on risk factors and treatment strategies for severe ADV infection in children undergoing chemotherapy. CASE SUMMARY: We report a case of a 15-year-old boy with a fatal systemic ADV infection...
October 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
Matthew P Lungren, Will S Lindquester, F Glen Seidel, Nishita Kothry, Eric J Monroe, Giri Shivaram, Anne E Gill, Matthew C Hawkins
PURPOSE: To describe and assess the technical success and safety of ultrasound guided liver biopsy with gelatin sponge pledget tract embolization technique in infants less than 10 kg across three tertiary pediatric hospitals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: There were 67 pediatric patients weighing less than 10 kg (36 males; 31 females; average age 202 days; average weight 6 kg, range 1.5 kg to 9.9 kg) referred for liver biopsy performed with ultrasound guidance and gelatin sponge pledget tract embolization during a two year period...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition
Karen Arane, Ran D Goldman
QUESTION: A 2-year-old patient in my practice with acute otitis media that has progressed to mastoiditis with a high fever returns with positive culture results for Fusobacterium What should I do next? ANSWER: Fusobacterium is a genus of anaerobic bacteria. Although Fusobacterium infections are rare, they can become severe if not treated promptly. Appropriate treatment is combination antibiotic therapy consisting of a β-lactam (penicillin, cephalosporin) and an anaerobic antimicrobial agent (metronidazole, clindamycin)...
October 2016: Canadian Family Physician Médecin de Famille Canadien
Samia Hamouda, Karima Chraiet, Fatma Khalsi, Imen Bel Hadj, Ines Brini, Hanen Smaoui, Sihem Barsaoui, Azza Samoud, Saida Ben Becher, Najla Ben Jaballah, Amel Kechrid, Faten Tinsa, Khadija Boussetta
Background Community-acquired pleuropneumonia (CPP) is a common complication of pneumonia in children. It is serious given its high morbidity and significant mortality. Aim To study clinical and paraclinical features of CPP in children and to establish a common therapeutic strategy. Methods Our retrospective study included patients who were hospitalized for CPP between 2004 and 2012. All data were collected from patients' medical files. Statistical analysis was made by Epi-Info 6. Results One hundred and sixty four patients were registered...
April 2016: La Tunisie Médicale
Kenneth A Michelson, Richard G Bachur, Jason A Levy
OBJECTIVES: The presence of critically ill patients may impact care for other ED patients. We sought to evaluate whether the presence of a critically ill child was associated with the time to (1) receipt of the first medication among other patients, and (2) administration of diagnosis-specific medications. METHODS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of all paediatric ED visits over 3 years. Patients were exposed if they arrived during the first hour of a critically ill patient's care...
September 28, 2016: Emergency Medicine Journal: EMJ
Yasuko Kamiya, Tadao Hasegawa, Yasuhiko Takegami, Kazuhiro Horiba, Shotaro Ando, Yuka Torii, Hiroyuki Kidokoro, Taichi Kato, Jun Natsume, Jun-Ich Kawada, Yoshinori Ito
Primary abscess of the iliopsoas muscle in children is uncommon, especially due to Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus: GAS), which causes a variety of diseases ranging from pharyngitis to invasive life-threatening infection. We present primary iliopsoas abscess in a nine-year-old boy presenting with fever, mild disturbance of consciousness, limp, and pain in the right loin. Magnetic resonance imaging and isolation of GAS from both blood and abscess samples led us to the confirmative diagnosis. The patient recovered after treatment comprising drainage and intravenous antibiotics...
September 27, 2016: Journal of Infection and Chemotherapy: Official Journal of the Japan Society of Chemotherapy
Mohannad Abu Omar, Emily Tylski, Mouhanna Abu Ghanimeh, Ashraf Gohar
Congenital pulmonary airway malformation (CPAM) is a rare congenital abnormality with unknown exact aetiology or clear genetic association. It is characterised by a failure of bronchial development and localised glandular overgrowth. Typically, it is diagnosed on prenatal ultrasound, only infrequently in children, and even less commonly in adults. We present a case of a 25-year-old man, with no previous lung diseases who presented with right-sided chest pain, fever and cough suggestive of pulmonary infection...
September 26, 2016: BMJ Case Reports
Öznur Küçük, Suat Biçer, Meltem Ugraş, Defne Çöl, Tuba Giray, Gülay Çiler Erdag, Yeşim Gürol, Gülden Yilmaz, Zerrin Yalvaç, Ayça Vitrinel, Çigdem Kaspar
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory data of children with acute gastroenteritis caused by non-typhoid Salmonella spp. infections. Clinical (demographic data, symptoms and findings) and laboratory data (stool microscopy, rapid antigen tests, culture, multiplex polymerase chain reaction and blood test results) of children with acute gastroenteritis caused by non-typhoid Salmonella spp. between January 2010 and October 2012 were evaluated. Differences between the groups for categorical variables were estimated with a chi-square or Fisher exact test; for continuous variables with two independent samples a t test was used...
September 1, 2016: Le Infezioni in Medicina
Mathias Rathe, Grith L Sorensen, Peder S Wehner, Uffe Holmskov, Per T Sangild, Kjeld Schmiegelow, Klaus Müller, Steffen Husby
BACKGROUND: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a host defense molecule of the innate immune system that enhances pathogen clearance and modulates inflammatory responses. We hypothesized that circulating SP-D levels are associated with chemotherapy-induced mucositis and infectious morbidity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). PROCEDURE: In a prospective study, 43 children receiving treatment for ALL were monitored for mucosal toxicity from diagnosis through the induction phase of treatment...
September 26, 2016: Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Nigus Zegeye, Daniel Asrat, Yimtubezinash Woldeamanuel, Abebe Habte, Etsegenet Gedlu, Tone Tønjum, Abraham Aseffa
BACKGROUND: Among children diagnosed to have chronic rheumatic valvular heart disease (RHD) in Ethiopia, many have been observed to develop recurrence of rheumatic fever (RF) despite secondary prophylaxis. This study determined the throat culture positivity rate and drug susceptibility pattern of beta hemolytic streptococci (BHS) isolated from children attending a specialized cardiac clinic in Ethiopia. METHODS: Throat swabs were collected from 233 children receiving benzathine penicillin injection as secondary prophylaxis for RHD and cultured...
September 23, 2016: BMC Infectious Diseases
M Le Hanneur, C Vidal, C Mallet, K Mazda, B Ilharreborde
A 32-month-old boy presented with febrile limping that had developed over 6days, associated with right lumbosacral inflammatory swelling. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed joint effusion of the right L5-S1 zygapophyseal joint, complicated by destructive osteomyelitis of the L5 articular process and paraspinal abscess. Surgery was decided to evacuate the fluid accumulation and rule out differential diagnoses. The diagnosis of septic arthritis of the facet joint was confirmed intraoperatively; real-time quantitative PCR analysis identified Kingella kingae...
September 14, 2016: Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Surgery & Research: OTSR
Mieke L van Driel, An Im De Sutter, Hilde Habraken, Sarah Thorning, Thierry Christiaens
BACKGROUND: Antibiotics provide only modest benefit in treating sore throat, although effectiveness increases in participants with positive throat swabs for group A beta-haemolytic streptococci (GABHS). It is unclear which antibiotic is the best choice if antibiotics are indicated. OBJECTIVES: To assess the evidence on the comparative efficacy of different antibiotics in: (a) alleviating symptoms (pain, fever); (b) shortening the duration of the illness; (c) preventing relapse; and (d) preventing complications (suppurative complications, acute rheumatic fever, post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis)...
September 11, 2016: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Norma E González, Silvia Álvarez Ponte, Mariela López, Pablo Fronti, Silvina Smith, Victor Pawluk
The secondary hemophagocytic syndrome is rare in children and even rarer associated with tuberculosis. e report the case of a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, disseminated tuberculosis and hemophagocytic syndrome. An 8-year-old girl, diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, was admitted due to fever, vomiting and abdominal pain. She presented abdominal distension, dehydration, tachypnea, crackles and wheezing in both lungs, anemia, thrombocytopenia and coagulopathy. She received broad-spectrum antibiotics and exploratory laparotomy was performed with appendectomy and lymph node biopsy...
October 1, 2016: Archivos Argentinos de Pediatría
Ana M Silva, Lauwence A Schmalbach
Psoas abscess is a common disease in children. It can have a nonspecific clinical presentation, insidious onset and sometimes fever. The most common type in children is the primary one; however, it can sometimes be of secondary origin and associated with severe infections such as osteomyelitis so a high index of suspicion is required to detect and treat it promptly. We present an unusual case of psoas abscess with infiltration of the vertebral body of L2 in a 14 year old male patient previously healthy with no history of trauma or fever on admission...
October 1, 2016: Archivos Argentinos de Pediatría
Anne G M Schilder, Tasnee Chonmaitree, Allan W Cripps, Richard M Rosenfeld, Margaretha L Casselbrant, Mark P Haggard, Roderick P Venekamp
Otitis media (OM) or middle ear inflammation is a spectrum of diseases, including acute otitis media (AOM), otitis media with effusion (OME; 'glue ear') and chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). OM is among the most common diseases in young children worldwide. Although OM may resolve spontaneously without complications, it can be associated with hearing loss and life-long sequelae. In developing countries, CSOM is a leading cause of hearing loss. OM can be of bacterial or viral origin; during 'colds', viruses can ascend through the Eustachian tube to the middle ear and pave the way for bacterial otopathogens that reside in the nasopharynx...
2016: Nature Reviews. Disease Primers
Alastair D Hay, Niamh M Redmond, Sophie Turnbull, Hannah Christensen, Hannah Thornton, Paul Little, Matthew Thompson, Brendan Delaney, Andrew M Lovering, Peter Muir, John P Leeming, Barry Vipond, Beth Stuart, Tim J Peters, Peter S Blair
BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial resistance is a serious threat to public health, with most antibiotics prescribed in primary care. General practitioners (GPs) report defensive antibiotic prescribing to mitigate perceived risk of future hospital admission in children with respiratory tract infections. We developed a clinical rule aimed to reduce clinical uncertainty by stratifying risk of future hospital admission. METHODS: 8394 children aged between 3 months and 16 years presenting with acute cough (for ≤28 days) and respiratory tract infection were recruited to a prognostic cohort study from 247 general practitioner practices in England...
September 1, 2016: Lancet Respiratory Medicine
Ching-Chia Kuo, Yu-Shin Lee, Ming-Ru Lin, Shao-Hsuan Hsia, Chih-Jung Chen, Cheng-Hsun Chiu, Mao-Sheng Hwang, Yhu-Chering Huang
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: Kawasaki disease (KD) is a febrile systemic vasculitis, and some patients may develop serious complications requiring intensive care. We aim to ascertain the clinical presentations and outcomes of these patients. METHODS: From October 2004 to October 2014, children with KD who had stayed in the pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) for acute stage treatment were defined as case patients; for each case, three age/sex-matched patients with KD but without ICU stay, if identified, were selected as control patients...
July 29, 2016: Journal of Microbiology, Immunology, and Infection, Wei Mian Yu Gan Ran za Zhi
Lubaba Shahrin, Mohammod Jobayer Chisti, Sayeeda Huq, Md Munirul Islam, Shafiqul Alam Sarker, Mahmuda Begum, Shukla Saha, Tahmeed Ahmed
INTRODUCTION: Streptococcus pneumonia is the most common and intimidating cause of childhood meningitis. Its delayed diagnosis may be associated with hyponatremia and hypernatremia with fatal outcome. CASE PRESENTATION: A previously healthy nine-month-old Bangladeshi female infant was diagnosed with diarrhea, pneumonia, and convulsion due to hypernatremia. Pneumonia was confirmed by respiratory distress and radiological findings. Routine cerebrospinal fluid study detected pneumococcal meningitis...
2016: Journal of Infection in Developing Countries
Mathilde Delebarre, Aude Tiphaine, Alain Martinot, François Dubos
BACKGROUND: In 2012, new international guidelines for children with chemotherapy-induced febrile neutropenia (FN) were issued, recommending reduced-intensity management strategy based on stratification of infectious risks. Some studies have highlighted practice disparities in different countries and within the same country. Our aim was to assess the current management strategies for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced FN in children in France. PROCEDURE: This survey of all French pediatric oncology-hematology reference centers (n = 30) in late 2012 and early 2013 sent a standardized questionnaire to each center inquiring about their definition of an FN episode, its initial empiric treatment and ongoing management, use of management stratified by risk, and any criteria used for the risk assessment...
August 28, 2016: Pediatric Blood & Cancer
Amaya L Bustinduy, Irina Chis Ster, Rebecca Shaw, Adam Irwin, Jaiganesh Thiagarajan, Rhys Beynon, Shamez Ladhani, Mike Sharland
OBJECTIVE: To explore the risk factors for ward and paediatric assessment unit (PAU) admissions from the emergency department (ED). DESIGN: Prospective observational study. SETTING AND PATIENTS: Febrile children attending a large tertiary care ED during the winter of 2014-2015. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Ward and PAU admissions, National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines classification, reattendance to the ED within 28 days and antibiotic use...
August 22, 2016: Archives of Disease in Childhood
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"