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calcium and kidney

Zengchun Ye, Qunzi Zhang, Yan Li, Cheng Wang, Jun Zhang, Xinxin Ma, Hui Peng, Tanqi Lou
Hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) is recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, the prevalence of HHcy and its role in association with target organ damage in patients with chronickidney disease (CKD) are not well understood. This cross-sectional study included 1042 CKD patients who were admitted to our hospital. Patients were divided into two groups: hyperhomocysteinemia and normohomocysteinemia. Multivariable linear regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between plasma homocysteine and renal/cardiovascular parameters...
October 20, 2016: Nutrients
Casey M Rebholz, Adrienne Tin, Yang Liu, Marie Fanelli Kuczmarski, Michele K Evans, Alan B Zonderman, Deidra C Crews
BACKGROUND: Prior studies suggest that certain aspects of the diet related to magnesium intake, such as dietary acid load, protein intake and dietary patterns rich in fruits and vegetables, may impact kidney disease risk. We hypothesized that lower dietary magnesium intake would be prospectively associated with more rapid kidney function decline. METHODS: Among participants in the Healthy Aging in Neighborhoods of Diversity across the Life Span study with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥60 ml/min/1...
October 22, 2016: American Journal of Nephrology
Muhammad Rafehi, Joachim C Burbiel, Isaac Y Attah, Aliaa Abdelrahman, Christa E Müller
The Gq protein-coupled, ATP- and UTP-activated P2Y2 receptor is a potential drug target for a range of different disorders, including tumor metastasis, inflammation, atherosclerosis, kidney disorders, and osteoporosis, but pharmacological studies are impeded by the limited availability of suitable antagonists. One of the most potent and selective antagonists is the thiouracil derivative AR-C118925. However, this compound was until recently not commercially available and little is known about its properties...
October 20, 2016: Purinergic Signalling
Giuseppe Dilorenzo, Michele Telegrafo, Giuseppe Marano, Michele De Ceglie, Amato Antonio Stabile Ianora, Giuseppe Angelelli, Marco Moschetta
Metastatic pulmonary calcification (MPC) is a rare pathological condition consisting of lung calcium salt deposits which commonly occurs in patients affected by chronic kidney disease probably for some abnormalities in calcium and phosphate metabolism. CT represents the technique of choice for detecting MPC findings including ground glass opacities and partially calcified nodules or consolidations. We present a case of MCP in a patient affected by hepato-renal autosomic-dominant polycystic disease; chest CT revealed extensive lobar-segmental parenchymal calcification with a peculiar cauliflower shape which we called "calcified cauliflower" sign...
2016: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports
Matthew C Ferroni, Kevin J Rycyna, Timothy D Averch, Michelle J Semins
PURPOSE: Vitamin D deficiency is often detected during metabolic evaluation in the nephrolithiasis population. Multiple vitamin D repletion protocols exist, however their differing impact on urinary stone formation risk factors is unclear. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with a history of calcium stones and vitamin D deficiency (<30ng/ml) were randomized to receive either 1,000 International Units (IU) daily or 50,000 IU weekly of vitamin D supplementation for 6 weeks...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Urology
Deliang Li, Jie Pi, Jianping Wang, Pengfei Zhu, Liuping Lei, Ting Zhang, Deming Liu
Discovering cost effective strategies to reduce cadmium (Cd) uptake is of great concern for consumer food safety in the aquaculture industry. This study investigated the protective effects of calcium (Ca) on Cd uptake in co-cultured silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and triangle sail mussel (Hyriopsis cumingii). The results show that Ca-depending on its applied concentration-caused a significant decrease in the Cd uptake into muscle (by 48 %-72 %), gills (by 51 %-57 %), liver (by 52 %-81 %) and kidney (by 54 %-81 %) of silver carp (p < 0...
October 19, 2016: Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
Hyun Jun Jung, Tae-Hwan Kwon
Kidney collecting duct is an important renal tubular segment for regulation of body water homeostasis and urine concentration. Water reabsorption in the collecting duct principal cells is controlled by vasopressin, a peptide hormone which induces the osmotic water transport across the collecting duct epithelia through regulation of water channel proteins aquaporin-2 (AQP2) and aquaporin-3 (AQP3). In particular, vasopressin induces both intracellular translocation of AQP2-bearing vesicles to the apical plasma membrane and transcription of Aqp2 gene to increase AQP2 protein abundance...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Renal Physiology
Mauro Boronat, Ángelo Santana, Elvira Bosch, Dionisio Lorenzo, Marta Riaño, César García-Cantón
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Different biochemical abnormalities of metabolic bone disease have been associated with anemia of chronic kidney disease (CKD), mainly in hemodialysis patients. However, all of these abnormalities are closely inter-related and their individual effect on the development of anemia is uncertain. This study was aimed to assess the relationship between anemia and a set of metabolic bone disease biomarkers in a cohort of adult patients with advanced non-dialysis-dependent CKD...
October 20, 2016: Nephron
Ravindra D Hiremath, Sunil S Jalalpure
OBJECTIVE: Aim of this study is to evaluate antiurolithiatic potential of whole plant hydro-alcoholic (30:70) extract of Vernonia cinerea Less. in accordance to its claims made in ancient literature and also being one of the ingredients of cystone, a marketed formulation widely used in the management of urolithiasis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: To induce urolithiasis, 0.75% v/v ethylene glycol was administered orally for 14 days. The curative dose of 400 mg/kg b.w. and preventive doses of 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg b...
July 2016: Indian Journal of Pharmacology
Johanne Tremblay, Carole G Campion, Thomas Verissimo, Suzanne Cossette, Hiroyuki Matsuda, Pavel Hamet
OBJECTIVE: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling plays a dual role in hypertension-induced kidney damage. EGFR is critically involved in angiotensin II-induced renal lesions and fibrosis but is also engaged in kidney tissue repair. Consequently, targeting EGFR in renal diseases is complex because even if inhibition of EGFR activity would be beneficial, a minimal EGFR activity is needed to recover from harmful insults. Our group has identified HCaRG (Hypertension-related, Calcium-Regulated Gene) whose expression is increased in kidneys of hypertensive rats and mice...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Chan Joo Lee, Jaewon Oh, Sang-Hak Lee, Seok-Min Kang, Donghoon Choi, Hyeon-Chang Kim, Sungha Park
OBJECTIVE: In most cases, the 5 first line drugs are recommended for management of hypertension without preference for one or the other. However, it is unclear whether different classes of anti-hypertensive agents have different effect on survival in low risk, uncomplicated hypertension. The aim of this study was to evaluate effects of 4 classes of first line anti-hypertensive agents on improving survival in patients with low risk, uncomplicated hypertension. DESIGN AND METHOD: Adult hypertensive patients without chronic kidney disease, end stage renal disease, diabetes mellitus, acute coronary syndrome, and heart failure in 2002 were selected from Korean National Health Insurance sample cohort consisting of one million subjects...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Daniel W Jones
Hypertension and Chronic Kidney Disease are both common. The vast majority of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have hypertension. Hypertension can be both a cause and a result of CKD. Many patients with CKD, both diabetic and non-diabetic have overt proteinuria (>300 mg/day). Patients with proteinuria are at higher risk for progression of kidney disease and for atherosclerosis. Because patients with CKD are often excluded from hypertension trials with hard outcomes, there has been until recently less data than ideal to consider in making decisions...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Shokei Kim-Mitsuyama
There is accumulating evidence that RAS inhibitors not only reduce blood pressure, but also exert pleiotropic effects, including a renoprotective effect, amelioration of insulin resistance, reduction in onset of diabetes, and suppression of cardiovascular remodelling,. However, the definite benefit of RAS inhibition in treatment of hypertension with CKD or DM is not conclusive. We previously performed the OlmeSartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study comparing the preventive effect of high-dose ARB therapy versus ARB plus CCB combination therapy on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in 1164 Japanese elderly hypertensive patients with baseline type 2 diabetes and/or CVD (Am J Med (2012))...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
David John Webb
Treatment-resistant hypertension (TRH) is defined as the failure to achieve an office BP target of <140/90 mmHg (<130/80 mmHg in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) or diabetes) in patients with hypertension (HT), despite adherence to at least 3 antihypertensive medications at optimal tolerated doses, ideally including a diuretic (Calhoun et al., Circulation 2008). TRH identifies patients with hard-to-treat HT, who might benefit from specialist investigation and treatment. Although some studies put the prevalence of TRH as >10%, these levels may be inflated by white-coat hypertension and poor adherence...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
William C Cushman
Beginning with the Veterans Administration (VA) Cooperative Hypertension Study of the 1960 s, blood pressure (BP) lowering with antihypertensive medications has been shown to reduce major cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, including coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure (HF) and CV and all-cause mortality in randomized controlled CV outcome trials. Multiple drugs were usually required in these trials to lower BP in treated participants. Medication regimens in the early trials, including the VA trial, included a thiazide-type diuretic (TTD) as initial therapy...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Franz Messerli
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the outcomes with use of renin angiotensin system (RAS) blockers compared with other antihypertensive agents in people with diabetes. DESIGN: Meta-analysis. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane central register of controlled trials databases for randomized trials of RAS blockers versus other antihypertensive agents in people with diabetes mellitus. Outcomes were death, cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, heart failure, revascularization, and end stage renal disease...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Solomon Kadiri
Hypertension prevalence rates in most urbanized areas of Africa range from 20-30%, with a recent systematic review reporting 16.2% for sub-Saharan Africa. These rates are lower than those in the West but the age standardized rates are higher than in other regions of the world. The attendant morbidity and mortality are disproportionately high. For example, failure of nocturnal dipping and microalbuminuria, predictive of vascular disease, occur relatively early in the course of hypertension and predispose to early vascular disease...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Fang-Fei Wei, Nadja E A Drummen, Lutgarde Thijs, Lotte Jacobs, Marjolein Herfs, Cynthia Van't Hoofd, Cees Vermeer, Jan A Staessen
Vitamin-K-dependent carboxylation of matrix Gla protein (MGP) protects the macrocirculation against calcification. We recently reported in a multiethnic population study that the estimated glomerular filtration rate, a microvascular trait, decreased and the risk of chronic kidney disease increased with higher circulating levels of inactive dephospho-uncarboxylated MGP, a marker of vitamin K deficiency. These findings highlighted the possibility that vitamin K might have a beneficial effect on the renal microcirculation...
September 2016: Pulse (Basel, Switzerland)
Sergio Mazzola Poli de Figueiredo, Andrea Olivares Magalhães, Patrícia Malafronte, José Ferraz de Souza, Yvoty Alves Santos Sens
High prevalence of hypovitaminosis D has been observed in patients with chronic kidney disease. However, there is not much data about its prevalence in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). The study included 83 adult KTRs at a single center to calculate the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D. Among the 83 patients, those with incomplete data were excluded leaving 22 patients available for study. The demographic and biochemical data were analyzed retrospectively. Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], parathyroid hormone (PTH), phosphorus, calcium, and creatinine were evaluated...
September 2016: Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
Dean G Assimos
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 2016: Journal of Urology
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