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Procedural memory

Rufin Vogels
New research published in Neuron describes assignment of cortical layer to single neurons recorded in awake monkeys. Applying the procedure to perirhinal cortex, Koyano et al. (2016) found marked and unsuspected differences among layers in the coding of associative memory signals.
October 19, 2016: Neuron
Kathleen A Puntillo, Adeline Max, Marine Chaize, Gerald Chanques, Elie Azoulay
OBJECTIVE: To assess patients' recollections of in-ICU procedural pain and its impact on post-ICU burden. DESIGN: Prospective longitudinal study of patients who underwent ICU procedures. SETTING: Thirty-four ICUs in France and Belgium. PATIENTS: Two hundred thirty-six patients who had undergone ICU procedures. INTERVENTION: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Patients were interviewed 3-16 months after hospitalization about: 1) recall of procedural pain intensity and pain distress (on 0-10 numeric rating scale); 2) current pain; that is, having pain in the past week that was not present before hospitalization; and 3) presence of traumatic stress (Impact of Events Scale)...
November 2016: Critical Care Medicine
David S Xu, Francisco Ponce
High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a neurosurgical procedure that was introduced in the late 1980s for the treatment of movement disorders. It is a reversible, adjustable, and non-ablative therapy that has been used in over 100,000 people worldwide. The surgical procedure used to implant the DBS system, as well as the effects of chronic electrical stimulation, have been shown to be safe and effective through many clinical trials. The ability to therapeutically modulate the motor circuits of the brain in this manner has resulted in consideration of use of this surgical strategy for other neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders involving non-motor circuits, including appetite, mood, and cognition...
October 14, 2016: Current Alzheimer Research
Mary Ellen McCann, Jurgen de Graaff
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Numerous preclinical studies have shown that general anesthetics adversely influence on the development of young brains. These adverse effects are dose-dependent occurring in specific stages of brain development. Histologic examinations show increased apoptosis, pathological neurogenesis and dendritic formation after exposure of infant animals to virtually all general anesthetics at a clinically effective dose which are associated with memory and behavioral changes at adulthood...
October 15, 2016: Current Opinion in Urology
Susana Vacas, Vincent Degos, Mervyn Maze
BACKGROUND: Sleep is integral to biologic function, and sleep disruption can result in both physiological and psychologic dysfunction including cognitive decline. Surgery activates the innate immune system, inducing neuroinflammatory changes that interfere with cognition. Because surgical patients with sleep disorders have an increased likelihood of exhibiting postoperative delirium, an acute form of cognitive decline, we investigated the contribution of perioperative sleep fragmentation (SF) to the neuroinflammatory and cognitive responses of surgery...
October 11, 2016: Anesthesia and Analgesia
Karen Tustin, Harlene Hayne
In two experiments, 3-year-old children were tested using an operant train procedure based on one originally developed by Carolyn Rovee-Collier. Children's behavioral and verbal recall of the event was assessed after a 24 hr (Experiment 1) and a 1-year delay (Experiment 2). After the 1-year delay, their mothers' verbal recall of the same event was also assessed. After both delays, children exhibited excellent nonverbal memory. Children also exhibited verbal, episodic memory of the same event, but their verbal reports were lean relative to those of their mothers, suggesting that the memories may be more vulnerable to forgetting over the long term...
November 2016: Developmental Psychobiology
Michael J Armson, Hervé Abdi, Brian Levine
Autobiographical memory tests provide a naturalistic counterpoint to the artificiality of laboratory research methods, yet autobiographical events are uncontrolled and, in most cases, unverifiable. In this study, we capitalised on a scripted, complex naturalistic event - the mask fit test (MFT), a standardised procedure required of hospital employees - to bridge the gap between naturalistic and laboratory memory assessment. We created a test of recognition memory for the MFT and administered it to 135 hospital employees who had undertaken the MFT at various points over the past five years...
October 17, 2016: Memory
Mark Galizio, Brooke April, Melissa Deal, Andrew Hawkey, Danielle Panoz-Brown, Ashley Prichard, Katherine Bruce
The Odor Span Task is an incrementing non-matching-to-sample procedure that permits the study of behavior under the control of multiple stimuli. Rats are exposed to a series of odor stimuli and selection of new stimuli is reinforced. Successful performance thus requires remembering which stimuli have previously been presented during a given session. This procedure has been frequently used in neurobiological studies as a rodent model of working memory; however, only a few studies have examined the effects of drugs on performance in this task...
October 17, 2016: Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior
François Osiurak, Emanuelle Reynaud, Jordan Navarro, Mathieu Lesourd
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
Stefan Elmer
Until now, several branches of research have fundamentally contributed to a better understanding of the ramifications of bilingualism, multilingualism, and language expertise on psycholinguistic-, cognitive-, and neural implications. In this context, it is noteworthy to mention that from a cognitive perspective, there is a strong convergence of data pointing to an influence of multilingual speech competence on a variety of cognitive functions, including attention, short-term- and working memory, set shifting, switching, and inhibition...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
L H Dünnweber, R Rödl, G Gosheger, F M Schiedel
Although clear advances have been made during the last 5 years, practical difficulties persist for patients and surgeons in procedures for intramedullary lengthening of long bones. In particular, precise adjustment of the desired amount of lengthening and technically reliable checking of the length actually achieved are problematic. An intramedullary nail with a new type of drive that exploits the shape memory effect has been constructed. The drive technology and the behavior of the intramedullary nail in situ were evaluated in a cadaver experiment...
October 10, 2016: Medical Engineering & Physics
Kathleen B McDermott, Adrian W Gilmore, Steven M Nelson, Jason M Watson, Jeffrey G Ojemann
Neuroimaging investigations of human memory encoding and retrieval have revealed that multiple regions of parietal cortex contribute to memory. Recently, a sparse network of regions within parietal cortex has been identified using resting state functional connectivity (MRI techniques). The regions within this network exhibit consistent task-related responses during memory formation and retrieval, leading to its being called the parietal memory network (PMN). Among its signature patterns are: deactivation during initial experience with an item (e...
September 24, 2016: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
Valérie Camos, Prune Lagner, Vanessa M Loaiza
Although verbal recall of item and order information is well-researched in short-term memory paradigms, there is relatively little research concerning item and order recall from working memory. The following study examined whether manipulating the opportunity for attentional refreshing and articulatory rehearsal in a complex span task differently affected the recall of item- and order-specific information of the memoranda. Five experiments varied the opportunity for articulatory rehearsal and attentional refreshing in a complex span task, but the type of recall was manipulated between experiments (item and order, order only, and item only recall)...
October 17, 2016: Memory
Dakota R B Lindsey, Claus Bundesen, Søren Kyllingsbæk, Anders Petersen, Gordon D Logan
In the partial-report task, subjects are asked to report only a portion of the items presented. Selective attention chooses which objects to represent in short-term memory (STM) on the basis of their relevance. Because STM is limited in capacity, one must sometimes choose which objects are removed from memory in light of new relevant information. We tested the hypothesis that the choices among newly presented information and old information in STM involve the same process-that both are acts of selective attention...
October 14, 2016: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
Wei-Chen Lin, Chen-Wang Chang, Cheng-Hsin Chu
Emergency cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis (AC) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates in elderly patients with significant comorbidities. The aim of this study was to evaluate percutaneous cholecystostomy for AC in elderly patients with various coexisting diseases. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 4311 patients with AC treated in Mackay Memorial Hospital between the years 2000 and 2015. The clinical course of AC was compared between nonelderly (age ≤70 years) and elderly patients (age>70 years)...
October 2016: Kaohsiung Journal of Medical Sciences
Marie Geurten, Steve Majerus, Caroline Lejeune, Corinne Catale
We present a new measure of everyday memory, the Questionnaire of Memory (Q-MEM), which is specifically adapted for the ecological assessment of memory disorders in school-age children and constructed with four sections tapping effortful/intentional learning, automatic/procedural learning, prospective memory/organization, and working memory. Confirmatory Factor Analyses supported the Q-MEM's four-factor structure in 700 five-to twelve-year-old children. The analyses also revealed a good internal reliability and a good test-retest fidelity...
October 11, 2016: Applied Neuropsychology. Child
Jens G Klinzing, Björn Rasch, Jan Born, Susanne Diekelmann
Sleep is known to support the consolidation of newly encoded and initially labile memories. Once consolidated, remote memories can return to a labile state upon reactivation and need to become reconsolidated in order to persist. Here we asked whether sleep also benefits the reconsolidation of remote memories after their reactivation and how reconsolidation during sleep compares to sleep-dependent consolidation processes. In three groups, participants were trained on a visuo-spatial learning task in the presence of a contextual odor...
October 6, 2016: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
A Gómez, B Rodríguez-Expósito, E Durán, I Martín-Monzón, C Broglio, C Salas, F Rodríguez
The presence of multiple memory systems supported by different neural substrata has been demonstrated in animal and human studies. In mammals, two variants of eyeblink classical conditioning, differing only in the temporal relationships between the conditioned stimulus (CS) and the unconditioned stimulus (US), have been widely used to study the neural substrata of these different memory systems. Delay conditioning, in which both stimuli coincide in time, depends on a non-relational memory system supported by the cerebellum and associated brainstem circuits...
October 6, 2016: Physiology & Behavior
Kenji W Koyano, Masaki Takeda, Teppei Matsui, Toshiyuki Hirabayashi, Yohei Ohashi, Yasushi Miyashita
The cerebral cortex computes through the canonical microcircuit that connects six stacked layers; however, how cortical processing streams operate in vivo, particularly in the higher association cortex, remains elusive. By developing a novel MRI-assisted procedure that reliably localizes recorded single neurons at resolution of six individual layers in monkey temporal cortex, we show that transformation of representations from a cued object to a to-be-recalled object occurs at the infragranular layer in a visual cued-recall task...
September 27, 2016: Neuron
Ricardo A Minervino, Valeria Olguín, Máximo Trench
Research on analogical thinking has devised several ways of promoting an abstract encoding of base analogs, thus rendering them more retrievable during later encounters with similar situations lacking surface similarities. Recent studies have begun to explore ways of facilitating transfer at retrieval time, which could facilitate the retrieval of distant analogs learned within contexts that were not specially directed to emphasize their abstract structure. Such studies demonstrate that comparing a target problem to an analogous problem helps students retrieve base analogs that lack surface similarities...
October 7, 2016: Memory & Cognition
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