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"Exercise recovery"

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29776562/the-pattern-of-a-broken-heart-can-circulating-mirs-help-to-distinguish-cardiac-pathologies-from-normal-post-exercise-recovery
#1
EDITORIAL
Martin Bahls, Nicolle Kränkel
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 1, 2018: International Journal of Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29761414/spatially-resolved-kinetics-of-skeletal-muscle-exercise-response-and-recovery-with-multiple-echo-diffusion-tensor-imaging-mediti-a-feasibility-study
#2
E E Sigmund, S H Baete, K Patel, D Wang, D Stoffel, R Otazo, P Parasoglou, J Bencardino
OBJECTIVES: We describe measurement of skeletal muscle kinetics with multiple echo diffusion tensor imaging (MEDITI). This approach allows characterization of the microstructural dynamics in healthy and pathologic muscle. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a Siemens 3-T Skyra scanner, MEDITI was used to collect dynamic DTI with a combination of rapid diffusion encoding, radial imaging, and compressed sensing reconstruction in a multi-compartment agarose gel rotation phantom and within in vivo calf muscle...
May 14, 2018: Magma
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29755363/an-evidence-based-approach-for-choosing-post-exercise-recovery-techniques-to-reduce-markers-of-muscle-damage-soreness-fatigue-and-inflammation-a-systematic-review-with-meta-analysis
#3
Olivier Dupuy, Wafa Douzi, Dimitri Theurot, Laurent Bosquet, Benoit Dugué
Introduction: The aim of the present work was to perform a meta-analysis evaluating the impact of recovery techniques on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), perceived fatigue, muscle damage, and inflammatory markers after physical exercise. Method: Three databases including PubMed, Embase , and Web-of-Science were searched using the following terms: ("recovery" or "active recovery" or "cooling" or "massage" or "compression garment" or "electrostimulation" or "stretching" or "immersion" or "cryotherapy") and ("DOMS" or "perceived fatigue" or "CK" or "CRP" or "IL-6") and ("after exercise" or "post-exercise") for randomized controlled trials, crossover trials, and repeated-measure studies...
2018: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29740332/metabolic-and-fatigue-profiles-are-comparable-between-prepubertal-children-and-well-trained-adult-endurance-athletes
#4
Anthony Birat, Pierre Bourdier, Enzo Piponnier, Anthony J Blazevich, Hugo Maciejewski, Pascale Duché, Sébastien Ratel
The aim of this study was to determine whether prepubertal children are metabolically comparable to well-trained adult endurance athletes and if this translates into similar fatigue rates during high-intensity exercise in both populations. On two different occasions, 12 prepubertal boys (10.5 ± 1.1 y), 12 untrained men (21.2 ± 1.5 y), and 13 endurance male athletes (21.5 ± 2.7 y) completed an incremental test to determine the power output at VO2max (PVO2max ) and a Wingate test to evaluate the maximal anaerobic power (Pmax ) and relative decrement in power output (i...
2018: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29663142/do-we-need-a-cool-down-after-exercise-a-narrative-review-of-the-psychophysiological-effects-and-the-effects-on-performance-injuries-and-the-long-term-adaptive-response
#5
REVIEW
Bas Van Hooren, Jonathan M Peake
It is widely believed that an active cool-down is more effective for promoting post-exercise recovery than a passive cool-down involving no activity. However, research on this topic has never been synthesized and it therefore remains largely unknown whether this belief is correct. This review compares the effects of various types of active cool-downs with passive cool-downs on sports performance, injuries, long-term adaptive responses, and psychophysiological markers of post-exercise recovery. An active cool-down is largely ineffective with respect to enhancing same-day and next-day(s) sports performance, but some beneficial effects on next-day(s) performance have been reported...
April 16, 2018: Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29656052/autologous-serum-collected-1h-post-exercise-enhances-natural-killer-cell-cytotoxicity
#6
Priti Gupta, Austin B Bigley, Melissa Markofski, Mitzi Laughlin, Emily C LaVoy
Natural Killer cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes that recognize and eliminate tumor cells. Exercise enhances NK cell cytotoxic activity (NKCA), yet the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Exercise-induced shifts in NK-cell subsets has been proposed as one mechanism. Alternatively, exercise alters stress hormone and cytokine levels, which are also known to affect NKCA. AIM: Determine the role(s) of exercise-induced shifts in the proportions of NK-cell subsets found in the blood, and changes in serum IL-2, IL-6, IL-12, IFN-γ, TNF-α and cortisol, on exercise-induced changes in NKCA...
April 12, 2018: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29643061/supplemental-oxygen-improves-in-vivo-mitochondrial-oxidative-phosphorylation-flux-in-sedentary-obese-adults-with-type-2-diabetes
#7
Melanie Cree-Green, Rebecca L Scalzo, Kylie Harrall, Bradley R Newcomer, Irene E Schauer, Amy G Huebschmann, Shawna McMillin, Mark S Brown, David Orlicky, Leslie Knaub, Kristen J Nadeau, P Mason Mcclatchey, Timothy A Bauer, Judith G Regensteiner, Jane E B Reusch
Type 2 diabetes is associated with impaired exercise capacity. Alterations in both muscle perfusion and mitochondrial function can contribute to exercise impairment. We hypothesized that impaired muscle mitochondrial function in type 2 diabetes is mediated, in part, by decreased tissue oxygen delivery and would improve with oxygen supplementation. Ex vivo muscle mitochondrial content and respiration assessed from biopsy samples demonstrated expected differences in obese individuals with (N=18) and without (N=17) diabetes...
April 11, 2018: Diabetes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29599872/responsiveness-of-the-countermovement-jump-and-handgrip-strength-to-an-incremental-running-test-in-endurance-athletes-influence-of-sex
#8
Felipe García-Pinillos, Pedro Delgado-Floody, Cristian Martínez-Salazar, Pedro Á Latorre-Román
The present study analyzed the acute effects of an incremental running test on countermovement jump (CMJ) and handgrip strength performance in endurance athletes, considering the effect of post-exercise recovery time and sex. Thirty-three recreationally trained long-distance runners, 20 men and 13 women, participated voluntarily in this study. The participants performed the Léger test, moreover, the CMJ and handgrip strength tests were carried out before and after the running test and during different stages of recovery (at the 1st min of recovery (posttest1), 5th min of recovery (posttest2), and 10th min of recovery (posttest3))...
March 2018: Journal of Human Kinetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29566543/beetroot-based-gel-supplementation-improves-handgrip-strength-forearm-muscle-o2-saturation-but-not-exercise-tolerance-and-blood-volume-in-jiu-jitsu-athletes
#9
Gustavo Vieira de Oliveira, Luiz Nascimento, Mônica Volino-Souza, Jacilene Mesquita, Thiago Alvares
The ergogenic effect of beetroot on the exercise performance of trained cyclists, runners, kayakers, and swimmers has been demonstrated. However, whether or not beetroot supplementation presents a beneficial effect on the exercise performance of jiu-jitsu athletes (JJA) remains inconclusive. Therefore, present study assessed the effect of beetroot-based gel (BG) supplementation on maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), exercise time until fatigue (ETF), muscle O2 saturation (SmO2), blood volume (tHb), and plasma nitrate and lactate in response to handgrip isotonic exercise (HIE) in JJA...
March 22, 2018: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, Physiologie Appliquée, Nutrition et Métabolisme
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29546639/beetroot-supplementation-improves-the-physiological-responses-to-incline-walking
#10
Mark Waldron, Luke Waldron, Craig Lawlor, Adrian Gray, Jamie Highton
PURPOSE: We investigated the effects of an acute 24-h nitrate-rich beetroot juice supplement (BR) on the energy cost, exercise efficiency and blood pressure responses to intermittent walking at different gradients. METHODS: In a double-blind, cross-over design, eight participants were provided with a total of 350 ml of nitrate-rich (~ 20.5 mmol nitrate) BR or placebo (PLA) across 24 h before completing intermittent walking at 3 km/h on treadmill at gradients of 1, 5, 10, 15 and 20%...
March 15, 2018: European Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29541131/oxygen-delivery-is-not-a-limiting-factor-during-post-exercise-recovery-in-healthy-young-adults
#11
Robert T Mankowski, Victor M Niemeijer, Jasper P Jansen, Lotte Spraakman, Henk J Stam, Stephan F E Praet
Purpose: It is still equivocal whether oxygen uptake recovery kinetics are limited by oxygen delivery and can be improved by supplementary oxygen. The present study aimed to investigate whether measurements of muscle and pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics can be used to assess oxygen delivery limitations in healthy subjects. Methods: Sixteen healthy young adults performed three sub-maximal exercise tests (6 min at 40% Wmax ) under hypoxic (14%O2 ), normoxic (21%O2 ) and hyperoxic (35%O2 ) conditions on separate days in randomized order...
June 2017: Journal of Exercise Science and Fitness
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29534444/protein-supplementation-during-or-following-a-marathon-run-influences-post-exercise-recovery
#12
Michael J Saunders, Nicholas D Luden, Cash R DeWitt, Melinda C Gross, Amanda Dillon Rios
The effects of protein supplementation on the ratings of energy/fatigue, muscle soreness [ascending (A) and descending (D) stairs], and serum creatine kinase levels following a marathon run were examined. Variables were compared between recreational male and female runners ingesting carbohydrate + protein (CP) during the run (CPDuring , n = 8) versus those that were consuming carbohydrate (CHODuring, n = 8). In a second study, outcomes were compared between subjects who consumed CP or CHO immediately following exercise [CPPost ( n = 4) versus CHOPost ( n = 4)]...
March 10, 2018: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29525331/-recovering-the-recognition-for-vo-2-kinetics-during-exercise-recovery-in-heart-failure-a-good-practice-in-need-of-more-exercise
#13
EDITORIAL
Marco Guazzi
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2018: JACC. Heart Failure
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29473893/restoration-of-muscle-glycogen-and-functional-capacity-role-of-post-exercise-carbohydrate-and-protein-co-ingestion
#14
Abdullah F Alghannam, Javier T Gonzalez, James A Betts
The importance of post-exercise recovery nutrition has been well described in recent years, leading to its incorporation as an integral part of training regimes in both athletes and active individuals. Muscle glycogen depletion during an initial prolonged exercise bout is a main factor in the onset of fatigue and so the replenishment of glycogen stores may be important for recovery of functional capacity. Nevertheless, nutritional considerations for optimal short-term (3-6 h) recovery remain incompletely elucidated, particularly surrounding the precise amount of specific types of nutrients required...
February 23, 2018: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29470824/turning-up-the-heat-an-evaluation-of-the-evidence-for-heating-to-promote-exercise-recovery-muscle-rehabilitation-and-adaptation
#15
REVIEW
Hamish McGorm, Llion A Roberts, Jeff S Coombes, Jonathan M Peake
Historically, heat has been used in various clinical and sports rehabilitation settings to treat soft tissue injuries. More recently, interest has emerged in using heat to pre-condition muscle against injury. The aim of this narrative review was to collate information on different types of heat therapy, explain the physiological rationale for heat therapy, and to summarise and evaluate the effects of heat therapy before, during and after muscle injury, immobilisation and strength training. Studies on skeletal muscle cells demonstrate that heat attenuates cellular damage and protein degradation (following in vitro challenges/insults to the cells)...
June 2018: Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29466686/divergent-effects-of-cold-water-immersion-versus-active-recovery-on-skeletal-muscle-fiber-type-and-angiogenesis-in-young-men
#16
Randall F D'Souza, Nina Zeng, James F Markworth, Vandre Casagrande Figueiredo, Llion Arwyn Roberts, Truls Raastad, Jeff S Coombes, Jonathan M Peake, David Cameron-Smith, Cameron J Mitchell
Resistance training (RT) increases muscle fiber size and induces angiogenesis to maintain capillary density. Cold water immersion (CWI), a common post-exercise recovery modality may improve acute recovery, but it attenuates muscle hypertrophy compared with active recovery (ACT). It is unknown if CWI following RT alters muscle fiber type expression or angiogenesis. Twenty-one men strength trained for 12 weeks, with either 10 min of CWI (n=11) or ACT (n=10) performed following each session. Vastus lateralis biopsies were collected at rest before and after training...
February 21, 2018: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29466090/enhanced-external-counterpulsation-and-short-term-recovery-from-high-intensity-interval-training
#17
Pedro L Valenzuela, Guillermo Sánchez-Martínez, Elaia Torrentegi, Zigor Montalvo, Alejandro Lucia, Pedro de la Villa
PURPOSE: The use of enhanced external counter-pulsation (EECP) as a recovery strategy has increased in recent years owing to its benefits in the clinical setting. However, its claimed effectiveness for the enhancement of exercise recovery has not been analyzed in athletes. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of EECP on short-term recovery after a fatiguing exercise bout. METHODS: 12 elite junior triathletes (16 ± 2 years) participated in this cross-over counterbalanced study...
February 21, 2018: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29462969/milk-an-effective-recovery-drink-for-female-athletes
#18
Paula Rankin, Adrian Landy, Emma Stevenson, Emma Cockburn
Milk has become a popular post-exercise recovery drink. Yet the evidence for its use in this regard comes from a limited number of investigations utilising very specific exercise protocols, and mostly with male participants. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of post-exercise milk consumption on recovery from a sprinting and jumping protocol in female team-sport athletes. Eighteen females participated in an independent-groups design. Upon completion of the protocol participants consumed 500 mL of milk (MILK) or 500 mL of an energy-matched carbohydrate (CHO) drink...
February 17, 2018: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29462924/achieving-optimal-post-exercise-muscle-protein-remodeling-in-physically-active-adults-through-whole-food-consumption
#19
REVIEW
Stephan van Vliet, Joseph W Beals, Isabel G Martinez, Sarah K Skinner, Nicholas A Burd
Dietary protein ingestion is critical to maintaining the quality and quantity of skeletal muscle mass throughout adult life. The performance of acute exercise enhances muscle protein remodeling by stimulating protein synthesis rates for several hours after each bout, which can be optimized by consuming protein during the post-exercise recovery period. To date, the majority of the evidence regarding protein intake to optimize post-exercise muscle protein synthesis rates is limited to isolated protein sources...
February 16, 2018: Nutrients
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29449080/influence-of-exercise-modality-on-cardiac-parasympathetic-and-sympathetic-indices-during-post-exercise-recovery
#20
Scott Michael, Ollie Jay, Kenneth S Graham, Glen M Davis
OBJECTIVES: This study investigated indirect measures of post-exercise parasympathetic reactivation (using heart-rate-variability, HRV) and sympathetic withdrawal (using systolic-time-intervals, STI) following upper- and lower-body exercise. DESIGN: Randomized, counter-balanced, crossover. METHODS: 13 males (age 26.4±4.7years) performed maximal arm-cranking (MAX-ARM) and leg-cycling (MAX-LEG). Subsequently, participants undertook separate 8-min bouts of submaximal HR-matched exercise of each mode (ARM and LEG)...
February 12, 2018: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
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