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Clemens Feistritzer, Stefan Schmidt
During the 57(th) annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology 2015 in Orlando, Florida, various aspects in the field of hemostaseology were presented. The Choosing Wisely® campaign pointed out the importance of the critical use of diagnostic tools to rule out pulmonary embolism and questioned the relevance of thrombophilia testing in women undergoing routine infertility evaluation. Furthermore, the approval of idarucizumab, a specific antidote for the reversal of the anticoagulant effects of the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran, was highlighted...
2016: Memo
Marijke Peetermans, Peter Verhamme
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 14, 2016: Clinical Toxicology
Hervé Quintard, Delphine Viard, Milou-Daniel Drici, Caroline Ruetsch, Charles Marc Samama, Carole Ichai
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 13, 2016: Thrombosis and Haemostasis
Luke Miller, Jason A Ferreira, Calvin Tucker
BACKGROUND: The development of novel oral anticoagulants (NOACs) has revolutionized oral anticoagulation. Rapid incorporation of NOACs into general practice has heightened the demand for directed reversal agents. Idarucizumab is a targeted reversal agent that is approved for the urgent reversal of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran. While it is a welcome addition to reversal strategies of dabigatran, a number of clinical questions exist regarding its place in therapy. OBJECTIVE: We describe controversies regarding the use of idarucizumab therapy in patients with dabigatran-associated bleeding...
October 8, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Josh J Wang, Eric Villeneuve, Sophie Gosselin
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 6, 2016: Clinical Toxicology
Paul A Reilly, Joanne van Ryn, Oliver Grottke, Stephan Glund, Joachim Stangier
The direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) provide a number of clinical advantages over vitamin K antagonists for the treatment of thromboembolism, including improved efficacy and safety, as well as no need for regular monitoring of anticoagulant effect. However, as with all anticoagulants, bleeding complications may occur, and anticoagulant reversal may be required in specific clinical situations, such as in patients experiencing spontaneous or traumatic bleeds, or in anticoagulated patients requiring emergency surgery or other invasive procedures...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Jerrold H Levy
Patients taking direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) who then need an emergency invasive procedure require specialized management strategies. Appropriate patient evaluation includes assessment of the current anticoagulation state, including timing of the last dose. DOACs require particular coagulation assays to measure anticoagulation levels accurately, although standard coagulation screening tests may provide qualitative guidance. Specialty societies have endorsed general recommendations for patient management to promote hemostasis in anticoagulated patients requiring surgery or other invasive procedures...
September 29, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Menno V Huisman, John Fanikos
As expected with all antithrombotic agents, there is a risk of bleeding complications in patients receiving direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) because of the DOAC itself, acute trauma, invasive procedures, or underlying comorbidities. For many bleeding events, a prudent course of action will be to withdraw the DOAC, then "wait and support" the patient, with the expectation that the bleeding event should resolve with time. Likewise, DOAC therapy may be interrupted ahead of a planned procedure, the stopping time being dependent on the agent involved and the patient's renal function...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Charles V Pollack
Idarucizumab is a monoclonal antibody fragment specifically targeted to dabigatran. It has demonstrated prompt and durable reversal of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran in animal studies and phase 1 studies of young, elderly, and renally impaired volunteers. Although elective invasive procedures and most bleeding complications in dabigatran-treated patients can be managed by temporarily stopping dabigatran therapy and using supportive measures, there are rare clinical situations that require urgent reversal of the anticoagulant effect of dabigatran...
September 28, 2016: American Journal of Emergency Medicine
Frederik Uttenthal Larsen, Anne-Mette Hvas, Erik Lerkevang Grove
Non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are alternatives to vitamin K antagonists and provide consistent anticoagulation with equal or better clinical outcome and no need for routine monitoring. Bleeding is a feared complication of anticoagulants. Until recently, no specific agent has been available for reversal of NOACs. Idarucizumab binds dabigatran for rapid reversal of its activity without procoagulant effects. Andexanet alpha (expected release in 2016) and PER977 are antidotes under clinical development...
October 3, 2016: Ugeskrift for Laeger
Supreet Kaur, Abhishek Kumar, Robert G Lerner, Wilbert S Aronow
The newer non-vitamin K dependent anticoagulants (NOACs) have provided a new tool in the armamentarium of physicians treating nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and thromboembolism. Slowly, but steadily, there has been an increased preference of NOACs over vitamin K antagonists. However, the major limiting factor and the concern that precluded their use was lack of reversal in emergent situations. With the advent of reversal agents such as idarucizumab, andexanet alfa and PER977, this gap is also being filled...
October 1, 2016: Archives of Medical Science: AMS
H C Diener, R Bernstein, K Butcher, B Campbell, G Cloud, A Davalos, S Davis, J M Ferro, M Grond, D Krieger, G Ntaios, A Slowik, E Touzé
Systemic thrombolysis with rt-PA is contraindicated in patients with acute ischemic stroke anticoagulated with dabigatran. This expert opinion provides guidance on the use of the specific reversal agent idarucizumab followed by rt-PA and/or thrombectomy in patients with ischemic stroke pre-treated with dabigatran. The use of idarucizumab followed by rt-PA is covered by the label of both drugs.
September 30, 2016: International Journal of Stroke: Official Journal of the International Stroke Society
Annemarie Gawehn, Yassine Ayari, Christian Heuschkel, Matthias Kaste, Pawel Kermer
BACKGROUND: Effective anticoagulation routinely precludes patients from receiving intravenous thrombolysis with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator to reverse severe symptoms of ischemic stroke. We report what we believe to be the first case of ischemic stroke successfully treated with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator after antagonizing dabigatran with the monoclonal antibody idarucizumab, recently approved worldwide. CASE PRESENTATION: A 75-year-old Caucasian man presented to our hospital with severe aphasia and mild hemiparesis...
September 29, 2016: Journal of Medical Case Reports
Benilde Cosmi
Anticoagulants such as heparins and vitamin K antagonists (VKA) are effective for thrombosis prevention and treatment, but are associated with the risk of bleeding and other limitations, spurring the search for improved drugs. Areas covered: to evaluate the newer anticoagulants, focusing on those tested in phase III clinical trials such as direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) and warfarin analogues. DOACs such as dabigatran, rivaroxaban, apixaban and edoxaban are licensed for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation and treatment of venous thromboembolism, dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban for postoperative thromboprophylaxis in patients undergoing elective hip or knee arthroplasty and rivaroxaban for secondary prevention of acute coronary syndromes...
October 12, 2016: Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy
Stefan Hofer, Christoph Philipsenburg, Markus A Weigand, Thorsten Brenner
Dabigatran etexilate is a direct oral anticoagulant used for the prevention of stroke in atrial fibrillation. Idarucizumab is a recently approved specific antidote that reverses the effect of dabigatran within minutes. We report the case of an 82-year-old patient with traumatic retroperitoneal arterial bleeding under anticoagulation with dabigatran etexilate. By administration of idarucizumab, we successfully normalized coagulation and saved the patient from an operation. In the course of the disease, a slight reincrease in dabigatran etexilate plasma levels was observed 2 days after the reversal, which could lead to a new onset of bleeding...
September 23, 2016: A & A Case Reports
Karen S Brown, Hamim Zahir, Michael A Grosso, Hans J Lanz, Michele F Mercuri, Jerrold H Levy
BACKGROUND: Four nonvitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are approved for the prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and for the treatment of venous thromboembolism. These include the direct thrombin inhibitor dabigatran and the direct factor Xa inhibitors rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban. Bleeding is a complication for all anticoagulants and concerns regarding bleeding risk and the suitability of effective reversal strategies may be a barrier to their prescription...
September 23, 2016: Critical Care: the Official Journal of the Critical Care Forum
N G Khorev, A P Momot, V O Kon'kova
During the last 10 years, several novel direct oral anticoagulants (NOACs) have entered the clinical arena and were registered in the Russian Federation for use in patients presenting with atrial fibrillation, venous thrombosis, and pulmonary artery thromboembolism. NOACs are classified into two groups: direct thrombin inhibitor (notably dabigatran) and factor Xa inhibitors (including rivaroxaban, apixaban, and edoxaban). Their disadvantage is lack of specific antidotes in case of an emergency situation (injury, infarction, stroke requiring thrombolysis, urgent operation)...
2016: Angiologii︠a︡ i Sosudistai︠a︡ Khirurgii︠a︡, Angiology and Vascular Surgery
Bethany T Samuelson, Adam Cuker
Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) offer noninferior efficacy and improved safety compared to vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) for the prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism and for the prevention of stroke and systemic embolism in nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Unlike VKAs, DOACs do not require routine laboratory monitoring of anticoagulant effect and dose adjustment. In certain situations, however, laboratory assessment of anticoagulant effect may be desirable. Here we review the utility of currently available assays for assessment of DOAC effect and recommend an optimal assessment strategy for each drug, including calibrated dilute thrombin time or ecarin-based assays for dabigatran and calibrated anti-Xa activity assays for the factor Xa inhibitors...
September 2, 2016: Blood Reviews
Kaylee K Marino, Raul A Santiago, Richard B Dew, Nancy Berliner, Jean M Connors, Nathan T Connell, John Kevin Tucker
Vitamin K antagonists have been a mainstay of treatment for patients requiring anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, but direct oral anticoagulants, such as dabigatran, have become increasingly prescribed. Compared with warfarin, dabigatran has a significantly lower risk of life-threatening bleeding; however, bleeding events can still occur, supporting the need for effective reversal strategies. Idarucizumab was recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to reverse the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran when life-threatening bleeding occurs or an urgent need for an invasive medical procedure exists...
October 2016: Pharmacotherapy
Peter Pommer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 8, 2016: Deutsches Ärzteblatt International
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