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Definition of brain death

Sami Al Kasab, Michael J Lynn, Tanya N Turan, Colin P Derdeyn, David Fiorella, Bethany F Lane, L Scott Janis, Marc I Chimowitz
BACKGROUND: An American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA) writing committee has recently recommended that tissue evidence of cerebral infarction associated with temporary symptoms (CITS) lasting <24 hours should be considered a stroke. We analyzed the impact of considering CITS as equivalent to stroke on the results of the Stenting and Aggressive Medical Management for Preventing Recurrent Stroke in Intracranial Stenosis (SAMMPRIS) trial. METHODS: We compared outcomes in the medical (n = 227) and stenting (n = 224) groups in SAMMPRIS using the following primary end point (new components in bold): any stroke, CITS, or death within 30 days after enrollment or within 30 days after a revascularization procedure for the qualifying lesion during follow-up; or ischemic stroke or CITS in the territory of the qualifying artery beyond 30 days...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases: the Official Journal of National Stroke Association
Shokei Kim-Mitsuyama
There is accumulating evidence that RAS inhibitors not only reduce blood pressure, but also exert pleiotropic effects, including a renoprotective effect, amelioration of insulin resistance, reduction in onset of diabetes, and suppression of cardiovascular remodelling,. However, the definite benefit of RAS inhibition in treatment of hypertension with CKD or DM is not conclusive. We previously performed the OlmeSartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study comparing the preventive effect of high-dose ARB therapy versus ARB plus CCB combination therapy on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in 1164 Japanese elderly hypertensive patients with baseline type 2 diabetes and/or CVD (Am J Med (2012))...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Salvatore Grosso, Maria Alessandra Carluccio, Elena Cardaioli, Alfonso Cerase, Alessandro Malandrini, Chiara Romano, Antonio Federico, Maria Teresa Dotti
BACKGROUND: Complex I deficiency is the most common energy generation disorder which may clinically present at any age with a wide spectrum of symptoms and signs. The T10158C mutation ND3 gene is rare and occurs in patients showing an early rapid neurological deterioration invariably leading to death after a few months. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a 9year-old boy with a mtDNA T10158C mutation showing a mild MELAS-like phenotype and brain MRI features congruent with both MELAS and Leigh syndrome...
October 11, 2016: Brain & Development
M Yoshikawa, K Yoshinaga, Y Imamura, T Hayashi, T Osako, K Takahashi, M Kaneko, M Fujisawa, S Kamidono
BACKGROUND: The organ donation rate in Japan is much lower than that in other developed countries for several reasons. An advanced educational program for in-hospital procurement coordinators is a possible solution for this. We introduced a Transplant Procurement Management (TPM) educational program at Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. METHODS: Ten healthcare professionals at Hyogo Prefecture participated in the Advanced International TPM course to educate themselves on TPM and held 2 TPM Model Organ Procurement Training Workshops at Hyogo Prefecture for in-hospital procurement coordinators...
September 2016: Transplantation Proceedings
Osamu Muramoto
BACKGROUND: This essay provides an ethical and conceptual argument for the use of informed consent prior to the diagnosis of brain death. It is meant to enable the family to make critical end-of-life decisions, particularly withdrawal of life support system and organ donation, before brain death is diagnosed, as opposed to the current practice of making such decisions after the diagnosis of death. The recent tragic case of a 13-year-old brain-dead patient in California who was maintained on a ventilator for over 2 years illustrates how such a consent would have made a crucial difference...
October 13, 2016: Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine: PEHM
Paul G Ince, Thais Minett, Gill Forster, Carol Brayne, Stephen B Wharton
INTRODUCTION: Microinfarcts, small ischaemic foci common in ageing brain, are associated with dementia and gait dysfunction. We determined their relationship to dementia, mobility and cerebrovascular disease in an older population-representative brain donor cohort. These data on microinfarcts were evaluated in relation to pathological assessments of clinically significant cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). METHODS: Microinfarcts were assessed in the MRC Cognitive Function and Ageing Study (n=331)...
September 24, 2016: Neuropathology and Applied Neurobiology
Shokei Kim-Mitsuyama
There is accumulating evidence that RAS inhibitors not only reduce blood pressure, but also exert pleiotropic effects, including a renoprotective effect, amelioration of insulin resistance, reduction in onset of diabetes, and suppression of cardiovascular remodelling,. However, the definite benefit of RAS inhibition in treatment of hypertension with CKD or DM is not conclusive. We previously performed the OlmeSartan and Calcium Antagonists Randomized (OSCAR) study comparing the preventive effect of high-dose ARB therapy versus ARB plus CCB combination therapy on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in 1164 Japanese elderly hypertensive patients with baseline type 2 diabetes and/or CVD (Am J Med (2012))...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
E O Talbott, A M Malek, D Lacomis
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common motor neuron disease in adults and is characterized by neurodegeneration of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. The incidence of ALS is approximately 1-2.6 cases per 100 000 persons annually, whereas the prevalence is approximately 6 cases per 100 000. The average age of onset of ALS is currently 58-60 years and the average survival from onset to death is 3-4 years. Between October 19, 2010 and December 31, 2011, there were an estimated 12 187 prevalent cases diagnosed with definite ALS in the USA alone...
2016: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
Joan K Morris, Judith Rankin, Ester Garne, Maria Loane, Ruth Greenlees, Marie-Claude Addor, Larraitz Arriola, Ingeborg Barisic, Jorieke E H Bergman, Melinda Csaky-Szunyogh, Carlos Dias, Elizabeth S Draper, Miriam Gatt, Babak Khoshnood, Kari Klungsoyr, Jennifer J Kurinczuk, Catherine Lynch, Robert McDonnell, Vera Nelen, Amanda J Neville, Mary T O'Mahony, Anna Pierini, Hanitra Randrianaivo, Anke Rissmann, David Tucker, Christine Verellen-Dumoulin, Hermien E K de Walle, Diana Wellesley, Awi Wiesel, Helen Dolk
OBJECTIVES:  To provide contemporary estimates of the prevalence of microcephaly in Europe, determine if the diagnosis of microcephaly is consistent across Europe, and evaluate whether changes in prevalence would be detected using the current European surveillance performed by EUROCAT (the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies). DESIGN:  Questionnaire and population based observational study. SETTING:  24 EUROCAT registries covering 570 000 births annually in 15 countries...
2016: BMJ: British Medical Journal
Takashi Ohnishi, Yuka Nakamura, Toru Tanaka, Takuya Tanaka, Noriaki Hashimoto, Hideaki Haneishi, Tracy T Batchelor, Elizabeth R Gerstner, Jennie W Taylor, Matija Snuderl, Yukako Yagi
Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging have been widely used for visualizing the inside of the human body. However, in many cases, pathological diagnosis is conducted through a biopsy or resection of an organ to evaluate the condition of tissues as definitive diagnosis. To provide more advanced information onto CT or MR image, it is necessary to reveal the relationship between tissue information and image signals. We propose a registration scheme for a set of PT images of divided specimens and a 3D-MR image by reference to an optical macro image (OM image) captured by an optical camera...
August 2, 2016: Pathology, Research and Practice
William M Jackson, Christy D B Gray, Danye Jiang, Michele L Schaefer, Caroline Connor, Cyrus D Mintz
Data from epidemiologic studies and animal models have raised a concern that exposure to anesthetic agents during early postnatal life may cause lasting impairments in cognitive function. It is hypothesized that this is due to disruptions in brain development, but the mechanism underlying this toxic effect remains unknown. Ongoing research, particularly in rodents, has begun to address this question. In this review we examine currently postulated molecular mechanisms of anesthetic toxicity in the developing brain, including effects on cell death pathways, growth factor signaling systems, NMDA and GABA receptors, mitochondria, and epigenetic factors...
October 2016: Journal of Neurosurgical Anesthesiology
Aldo Bonaventura, Fabrizio Montecucco, Franco Dallegri
INTRODUCTION: Acute ischemic stroke (AIS) represents a major cause of death and disability all over the world. The recommended therapy aims at dissolving the clot to re-establish quickly the blood flow to the brain and reduce neuronal injury. Intravenous administration of recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is clinically used with this goal. AREAS COVERED: A description of beneficial and detrimental effects of rt-PA treatment is addressed. An overview of new therapies against AIS, such as new thrombolytics, sonolysis and sonothrombolysis, endovascular procedures, and association therapies is provided...
November 2016: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy
Björn Nashan, Mario Abbud-Filho, Franco Citterio
Delayed graft function (DGF) remains a major barrier to improved outcomes after kidney transplantation. High-risk transplant recipients can be identified, but no definitive prediction model exists. Novel biomarkers to predict DGF in the first hours post-transplant, such as neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), are under investigation. Donor management to minimize the profound physiological consequences of brain death is highly complex. A hormonal resuscitation package to manage the catecholamine "storm" that follows brain death is recommended...
October 2016: Clinical Transplantation
Catherine E Creeley
The fetal and neonatal periods are critical and sensitive periods for neurodevelopment, and involve rapid brain growth in addition to natural programmed cell death (i.e., apoptosis) and synaptic pruning. Apoptosis is an important process for neurodevelopment, preventing redundant, faulty, or unused neurons from cluttering the developing brain. However, animal studies have shown massive neuronal cell death by apoptosis can also be caused by exposure to several classes of drugs, namely gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists that are commonly used in pediatric anesthesia...
August 16, 2016: Brain Sciences
Eduardo Maria Normando, Benjamin Michael Davis, Lies De Groef, Shereen Nizari, Lisa A Turner, Nivedita Ravindran, Milena Pahlitzsch, Jonathan Brenton, Giulia Malaguarnera, Li Guo, Satyanarayana Somavarapu, Maria Francesca Cordeiro
Parkinson's Disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease worldwide, affecting 1 % of the population over 65 years of age. Dopaminergic cell death in the substantia nigra and accumulation of Lewy bodies are the defining neuropathological hallmarks of the disease. Neuronal death and dysfunction have been reported in other central nervous system regions, including the retina. Symptoms of PD typically manifest only when more than 70 % of dopaminergic cells are lost, and the definitive diagnosis of PD can only be made histologically at post-mortem, with few biomarkers available...
2016: Acta Neuropathologica Communications
E Nowak, R Pfitzner, P Przybyłowski
INTRODUCTION: The Polish definition of brain death originated from the original Harvard criteria and has been revised several times. Practitioners worldwide are required to regularly update their national guidelines on the definition of brain death to fit the latest international research concerning this topic. AIMS: (1) Compare current Polish guidelines on diagnosing brain death in adults with the American, British, Australian, and New Zealand recommendations; and (2) evaluate existing differences for the purposes of updating the Polish guidelines...
June 2016: Transplantation Proceedings
Sivabalan Manivannan, Victoria K Baxter, Kimberly L W Schultz, Barbara S Slusher, Diane E Griffin
UNLABELLED: Inflammation is a necessary part of the response to infection but can also cause neuronal injury in both infectious and autoimmune diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). A neurovirulent strain of Sindbis virus (NSV) causes fatal paralysis in adult C57BL/6 mice during clearance of infectious virus from the CNS, and the virus-specific immune response is implicated as a mediator of neuronal damage. Previous studies have shown that survival is improved in T-cell-deficient mice and in mice with pharmacological inhibition of the inflammatory response and glutamate excitotoxicity...
October 15, 2016: Journal of Virology
Jung Ae Lee, Nam Kwon Lee, Won Sup Yoon, Dae Sik Yang, Chul Yong Kim, Se Ryun Lee, Hwa Jeong Seong
AIM: Our study analyzed the frequency and causes of treatment interruption among patients undergoing radiation therapy (RT). METHODS: A total of 1637 RT courses in 1500 patients were reviewed from September 2009 to October 2013. A continuous break over 7 days or a discontinuous break over 14 days was regarded as a temporary break and RT under 80% of planned treatment was regarded as incomplete. RESULTS: Two-hundred and twenty courses (13...
August 4, 2016: Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology
A Dulamea, E Solomon
OBJECTIVE: Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is a human prion disease, rapidly progressive and fatal, characterized by spongiform encephalopathy. The characteristic triad of signs - rapidly progressive dementia, myoclonus and periodic sharp wave complexes (PSWC) on electroencephalography (EEG) - usually appear in the late stages of the disease. The clinical diagnosis of CJD ante-mortem involves the exclusion of the rapidly progressive non-prionic dementias, the definitive diagnosis requiring brain tissue confirmation...
April 2016: Journal of Medicine and Life
Asuka Araki, Noriyoshi Ishikawa, Saki Takami, Nahoko Ishikawa, Chika Amano, Haruo Takeshita, Riruke Maruyama
PURPOSE: Postmortem computed tomography (PMCT) has recently become important to clarify the cause of death in forensic medicine. It has also been proven to be useful for in-hospital deaths to a certain extent when interpreted by radiologists. However, accuracy of the interpretations of PMCT by non-radiologists remains to be elucidated. Nevertheless, they are often required to write death certificates based on the findings of PMCT in the absence of radiologists in Japan. We compared the interpretations of postmortem head CT (PMCT-H) by non-radiologists with the autopsy findings...
2016: SpringerPlus
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