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Central nervous system recovery

Lili Zhang, Zhaomin Fan, Yuechen Han, Lei Xu, Wenwen Liu, Xiaohui Bai, Meijuan Zhou, Jianfeng Li, Haibo Wang
Valproic acid (VPA), a medication primarily used to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder, has been applied to the repair of central and peripheral nervous system injury. The present study investigated the effect of VPA on functional recovery, survival of facial motor neurons (FMNs), and expression of proteins in rats after facial nerve trunk transection by functional measurement, Nissl staining, TUNEL, immunofluorescence, and Western blot. Following facial nerve injury, all rats in group VPA showed a better functional recovery, which was significant at the given time, compared with group NS...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience: MN
Seokjo Kang, Jayoung Byun, Sung Min Son, Inhee Mook-Jung
Alzheimer's disease (AD) is often characterized by the impairment of mitochondrial function caused by excessive mitochondrial fragmentation. Thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), which is primarily secreted from astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS), has been suggested to play a role in synaptogenesis, spine morphology, and synaptic density of neurons. In this study, we investigate the protective role of TSP-1 in the recovery of mitochondrial morphology and function in amyloid β (Aβ)-treated mouse hippocampal neuroblastoma cells (HT22)...
December 2018: Cell Death Discovery
Karen K Ling, Michaela Jackson, Duah Alkam, Dawei Liu, Norm Allaire, Chao Sun, Mahmoud Kiaei, Alexander McCampbell, Frank Rigo
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal adult onset motor neuron disease characterized by progressive denervation and subsequent motor impairment. EphA4, a negative regulator of axonal growth, was recently identified as a genetic modifier in fish and rodent models of ALS. To evaluate the therapeutic potential of EphA4 for ALS, we examined the effect of CNS-directed EphA4 reduction in preclinical mouse models of ALS, and assessed if the levels of EPHA4 mRNA in blood correlate with disease onset and progression in human ALS patients...
March 6, 2018: Neurobiology of Disease
Fernando Peixoto Ferraz de Campos, Marcia Yoshie Kanegae, Vera Demarchi Aiello, Pedro José Dos Santos, Tatiane Carneiro Gratão, Erasmo Simão Silva
Central nervous system (CNS) ischemic events, besides being a common and devastating disease, are accompanied by severe disability and other morbidities. The cause of such events is not always that simple to diagnose, and among the young, a broad spectrum of possibilities should be considered. We present the case of a young man who presented two episodes of CNS ischemia with a 1 year gap between them, which occurred in the same situation while he was walking and carrying a heavy backpack. The second event first presented as a transient ischemic attack followed by a stroke the day after...
January 2018: Autopsy & Case Reports
Ying Yu, Peicai Fu, Zhiyuan Yu, Minjie Xie, Wei Wang, Xiang Luo
Cerebral white matter is vulnerable to ischemic condition. However, no effective treatment to alleviate or restore the myelin damage caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion has been found. Na+ -K+ -Cl- cotransporter 1 (NKCC1), a Na+ -K+ -Cl- cotransporter widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), involves in regulation of cell swelling, EAA release, cell apoptosis, and proliferation. Nevertheless, the role of NKCC1 in chronic hypoperfusion-induced white matter lesions (WMLs) has not been explored...
March 3, 2018: Journal of Molecular Neuroscience: MN
Bhuvaneshwar Vaidya, Ali Ehsan Sifat, Vardan T Karamyan, Thomas J Abbruscato
Novel neuroprotective therapies are desperately needed to improve neuronal recovery after ischemic stroke and extend the therapeutic window or offset some of the adverse effects of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA). These advances could provide a more effective and safe therapeutic regimen for patients with ischemic stroke. The opioid system has gained intense interest over the past fw years and is currently being investigated as a viable target for the pharmacological treatment of stroke. In this review, we focus on different opioid receptors (ORs) and their distribution in the central nervous system (CNS), and the effect of ischemic stroke on their redistribution...
March 1, 2018: Drug Discovery Today
Poornima Venkat, Michael Chopp, Jieli Chen
Stroke is a global health concern and it is imperative that therapeutic strategies with wide treatment time frames be developed to improve neurological outcome in patients. Patients with diabetes mellitus who suffer a stroke have worse neurological outcomes and long-term functional recovery than nondiabetic stroke patients. Diabetes induced vascular damage and enhanced inflammatory milieu likely contributes to worse post stroke outcomes. Diabetic stroke patients have an aggravated pathological cascade, and treatments that benefit nondiabetic stroke patients do not necessarily translate to diabetic stroke patients...
March 2, 2018: Stem Cells Translational Medicine
Mikhail E Sokolov, Farid V Bashirov, Vage A Markosyan, Tatyana V Povysheva, Filip O Fadeev, Andrey A Izmailov, Maxim S Kuztetsov, Zufar Z Safiullov, Maxim M Shmarov, Boris S Naroditskyi, András Palotás, Rustem R Islamov
Natural brain repair after stroke is extremely limited, and current therapeutic options are even more scarce with no clinical break-through in sight. Despite restricted regeneration in the central nervous system, we have previously proved that human umbilical cord blood mono-nuclear cells (UCB-MC) transduced with adenoviral vectors carrying genes encoding vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) successfully rescued neurons in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury...
2018: Frontiers in Pharmacology
Maja Vulovic, Nevena Divac, Igor Jakovcevski
The nervous system is a notable exception to the rule that the cell is the structural and functional unit of tissue systems and organs. The functional unit of the nervous system is the synapse, the contact between two nerve cells. As such, synapses are the foci of investigations of nervous system organization and function, as well as a potential readout for the progression of various disorders of the nervous system. In the past decade the development of antibodies specific to presynaptic terminals has enabled us to assess, at the optical, laser scanning microscopy level, these subcellular structures, and has provided a simple method for the quantification of various synapses...
2018: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy
Bonfiglio Tommaso, Vergassola Matteo, Guendalina Olivero, Anna Pittaluga
BACKGROUND: Aging is an unavoidable, physiological process that reduces the complexity and the plasticity of the synaptic contacts in central nervous system (CNS), having profound implications for human wellbeing. The term "cognitive reserve" refers to central cellular adaptations that augment the resilience of human brain to damage and aging. The term "Cognitive training" indicates the cultural, social and physical stimulations proposed as add-on therapy for the cure of central neurological diseases...
February 28, 2018: Current Medicinal Chemistry
Feng Yang, Fabricio Saucedo, Mu Qiao
The purpose of this pilot study was to establish the efficacy and feasibility of a single-session treadmill-based stance-slip perturbation program on preventing slip-related falls while walking over the ground among young adults. Two groups (training vs. control) of healthy young participants were respectively exposed to a treadmill-based stance-slip perturbation training protocol and a placebo training protocol. Post training, both groups experienced an unexpected overground gait-slip. Our results indicated that 28...
February 21, 2018: Journal of Biomechanics
Igor Manzhulo, Anna Tyrtyshnaia, Yuliya Kipryushina, Inessa Dyuizen, Ekaterina Ermolenko, Olga Manzhulo
The present study demonstrates that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3) injected subcutaneously leads to recovery of locomotor functions observed within 5 weeks after traumatic spinal cord injury. This activity is confirmed by improving of BBB locomotor rating scale indicators. We assume that this activity is related to (1) enhancement of remyelination process, (2) proliferative activity, (3) antioxidant activity, (4) increase in GFAP staining and (5) enhancement of vimentin expression. In general, the results of the study show that DHA has a complex effect on post-traumatic central nervous system recovery, indicating its high therapeutic potential...
February 17, 2018: Neuroscience Letters
Tali Capua, Amir Klivitsky, Efraim Bilavsky, Liat Ashkenazi-Hoffnung, Jonathan Roth, Shlomi Constantini, Galia Grisaru-Soen
Group A Streptococcus (GAS) is a rare cause of central nervous system infections. We describe 3 new cases of GAS brain abscess in previously healthy children treated by us between 2015-2016 and review the 5 cases reported in the literature since 1988. All 8 children received early empiric antibiotic therapy and surgical intervention, and 5 made a full recovery. GAS brain abscess is a rare infection; however its incidence may be rising. We suggest that if patients show symptoms such as fever, vomiting, and lethargy, with contiguous infection such as otitis media, mastoiditis, sinusitis, or meningitis, GAS brain abscess should be suspected...
February 16, 2018: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
J Dai, L-J Xu, G-D Han, H-L Sun, G-T Zhu, H-T Jiang, G-Y Yu, X-M Tang
OBJECTIVE: Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a severe trauma to the central nervous system. Long non-coding RNAs have been reported to play essential roles in spinal cord injury. This study mainly explored the role of micro-125 in the regulation of spinal cord injury by regulating STAT3. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The stable mouse model of cervical spinal cord contusion was established by Infinite Horizon spinal cord striker, and the model mice' motor function was analyzed...
February 2018: European Review for Medical and Pharmacological Sciences
Maria K Perwein, John A Smestad, Arthur E Warrington, Robin M Heider, Mark W Kaczor, Louis J Maher, Bharath Wootla, Ahmad Kunbaz, Moses Rodriguez
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory demyelinating disease of the human central nervous system (CNS) and is the most common disabling neurological condition in young adults, resulting in severe neurological defects. No curative or long-term progression-inhibiting therapy has yet been developed. However, recent investigation has revealed potential strategies that do not merely modulate potentially pathogenic autoimmune responses, but stimulate remyelination within CNS lesions. Areas Covered: We discuss the history and development of natural human IgM-isotype immunoglobulins (HIgMs) and recently-identified aptamer-conjugates that have been shown to enhance endogenous myelin repair in animal models of demyelination by acting on myelin-producing oligodendrocytes (OLs) or oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) within CNS lesions...
February 20, 2018: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy
Russell E Thompson, Jennifer Pardieck, Laura Smith, Peter Kenny, Lindsay Crawford, Molly Shoichet, Shelly Sakiyama-Elbert
One reason for the lack of regeneration, and poor clinical outcomes, following central nervous system (CNS) injury is the formation of a glial scar that inhibits new axon growth. In addition to forming the glial scar, astrocytes have been shown to be important for spontaneous SCI recovery in rodents, suggesting some astrocyte populations are pro-regenerative, while others are inhibitory following injury. In this work, the effect of implanting hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogels containing extracellular matrix (ECM) harvested from mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC)-derived astrocytes on histologic outcomes following SCI in rats was explored...
February 6, 2018: Biomaterials
Zachary R Gallaher, Oswald Steward
Axons within the peripheral nervous system are capable of regeneration, but full functional recovery is rare. Recent work has shown that conditional deletion of two key signaling inhibitors of the PI3K and Jak/Stat pathways-phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3), respectively-promotes regeneration of normally non-regenerative central nervous system axons. Moreover, in studies of optic nerve regeneration, co-deletion of both PTEN and SOCS3 has an even greater effect...
February 16, 2018: Experimental Neurology
Jin-Shan Yang, Hui-Xing Wei, Ping-Ping Chen, Gang Wu
Multiple cellular components are involved in the complex pathological process following central nervous system (CNS) injury, including neurons, glial cells and endothelial cells. Previous studies and neurotherapeutic clinical trials have assessed the molecular mechanisms that underlie neuronal cell death following CNS injury. However, this approach has largely failed to reduce CNS damage or improve the functional recovery of patients. Erythropoietin-producing human hepatocellular (Eph) receptors and ephrin ligands have attracted considerable attention since their discovery, due to their extensive distribution and unique bidirectional signaling between astrocytes and neurons...
March 2018: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Keita Takahashi, Hideyuki Takeuchi, Yuji Kurihara, Hiroshi Doi, Misako Kunii, Kenichi Tanaka, Haruko Nakamura, Ryoko Fukai, Atsuko Tomita-Katsumoto, Mikiko Tada, Yuichi Higashiyama, Hideto Joki, Shigeru Koyano, Kohtaro Takei, Fumiaki Tanaka
BACKGROUND: Although inflammation in the central nervous system is responsible for multiple neurological diseases, the lack of appropriate biomarkers makes it difficult to evaluate inflammatory activities in these diseases. Therefore, a new biomarker reflecting neuroinflammation is required for accurate diagnosis, appropriate therapy, and comprehension of pathogenesis of these neurological disorders. We previously reported that the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentration of lateral olfactory tract usher substance (LOTUS), which promotes axonal growth as a Nogo receptor 1 antagonist, negatively correlates with disease activity in multiple sclerosis, suggesting that variation in LOTUS reflects the inflammatory activities and is a useful biomarker to evaluate the disease activity...
February 17, 2018: Journal of Neuroinflammation
M H Kuizenga, P J Colin, K M E M Reyntjens, D J Touw, H Nalbat, F H Knotnerus, H E M Vereecke, M M R F Struys
BACKGROUND: Neural inertia is defined as the tendency of the central nervous system to resist transitions between arousal states. This phenomenon has been observed in mice and Drosophila anaesthetized with volatile anaesthetics: the effect-site concentration required to induce anaesthesia in 50% of the population (C50 ) was significantly higher than the effect-site concentration for 50% of the population to recover from anaesthesia. We evaluated this phenomenon in humans using propofol or sevoflurane (both with or without remifentanil) as anaesthetic agents...
March 2018: British Journal of Anaesthesia
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