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Burn resuscitation

Nehemiah T Liu, José Salinas, Craig A Fenrich, Maria L Serio-Melvin, George C Kramer, Ian R Driscoll, Martin A Schreiber, Leopoldo C Cancio, Kevin K Chung
INTRODUCTION: The depth of burn has been an important factor often overlooked when estimating the total resuscitation fluid needed for early burn care. The goal of this study was to determine the degree to which full-thickness (FT) involvement affected overall 24-hour burn resuscitation volumes. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of patients admitted to our burn intensive care unit from December 2007 to April 2013, with significant burns that required resuscitation using our computerized decision support system for burn fluid resuscitation...
November 2016: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Benjamin Ziegler, Christoph Hirche, Johannes Horter, Jurij Kiefer, Paul Alfred Grützner, Thomas Kremer, Ulrich Kneser, Matthias Münzberg
INTRODUCTION: Initial therapy of severe burns in specialized burn trauma centers is a challenging task faced by the treating multi-professional and interdisciplinary team. A lack of consistent operating procedures and varying structural conditions was recently demonstrated in preliminary data of our group. These results raised the question on how specific treatment measures in acute burn care are met in the absence of standardized guidelines. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A specific questionnaire containing 57 multiple-choice questions was sent to all 22 major burn centers in Germany, Austria and Switzerland...
September 21, 2016: Burns: Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries
Janine M Duke, Sean M Randall, Mark W Fear, James H Boyd, Suzanne Rea, Fiona M Wood
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The systemic responses triggered by burns and resuscitative measures may cause pulmonary damage and edema in the acute phase. These effects may occur in the absence of inhalation injury. Currently, there is a paucity of data on the recovery of the respiratory system postburn. This study aimed to examine 10-year hospital service use for respiratory morbidity in children with cutaneous burns and no smoke inhalation injury. METHODS: A population-based longitudinal study with 10-year follow-up using linked hospital and death from Western Australia for children <5 years when hospitalized for a first burn injury (n = 5290) between 1980 and 2012 and a frequency matched noninjury comparison cohort, randomly selected from Western Australia's birth registrations (n = 27 061)...
September 23, 2016: Pediatrics
Cliff Reid, Ian Ferguson, Brian Burns, Karel Habig, Mohammed Shareef
BACKGROUND: Life-like end-tidal capnography (ETCO2) waveforms have been demonstrated in recently deceased and fresh-frozen cadavers following tracheal intubation, offering potential for high fidelity airway simulation training. As the mechanism for carbon dioxide production is not fully understood, it is possible that oesophageal intubation may also generate a capnograph. Our aim was to measure ETCO2 levels following (1) oesophageal and (2) tracheal intubation in fresh-frozen cadavers, and to observe the size, shape and duration of any capnographic waveform...
September 23, 2016: Emergency Medicine Journal: EMJ
Chih-Chun Chang, Chin-Chuan Yeh, Fang-Yeh Chu
The Formosa Fun Coast explosion, occurring in a recreational water park located in the Northern Taiwan on 27 June 2015, made 499 people burn-injured. For those who had severe burn trauma, surgical intervention and fluid resuscitation were necessary, and potential blood transfusion therapy could be initiated, especially during and after broad escharotomy. Here, we reviewed the literature regarding transfusion medicine and skin grafting as well as described the practicing experience of combined tissue and blood bank in the burn disaster in Taiwan...
October 2016: Transfusion and Apheresis Science
Sabri Soussi, Benjamin Deniau, Axelle Ferry, Charlotte Levé, Mourad Benyamina, Véronique Maurel, Maïté Chaussard, Brigitte Le Cam, Alice Blet, Maurice Mimoun, Jêrome Lambert, Marc Chaouat, Alexandre Mebazaa, Matthieu Legrand
BACKGROUND: Impact of early systemic hemodynamic alterations and fluid resuscitation on outcome in the modern burn care remains controversial. We investigate the association between acute-phase systemic hemodynamics, timing of fluid resuscitation and outcome in critically ill burn patients. METHODS: Retrospective, single-center cohort study was conducted in a university hospital. Forty critically ill burn patients with total body surface area (TBSA) burn-injured >20 % with invasive blood pressure and cardiac output monitoring (transpulmonary thermodilution technique) within 8 h from trauma were included...
December 2016: Annals of Intensive Care
Roberto Eljaiek, Christophe Heylbroeck, Marc-Jacques Dubois
OBJECTIVE: The objective was to systematically review the literature summarizing the effect on mortality of albumin compared to non-albumin solutions during the fluid resuscitation phase of burn injured patients. DATA SOURCES: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and CENTRAL and the content of two leading journals in burn care, Burns and Journal of Burn Care and Research. STUDY SELECTION: Two reviewers independently selected randomized controlled trials comparing albumin vs...
September 6, 2016: Burns: Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries
Samih Z Thalji, Anai N Kothari, Paul C Kuo, Michael J Mosier
OBJECTIVE: To examine the development of acute kidney injury (AKI) after burn injury as an independent risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality over initial hospitalization and 1-year follow-up. BACKGROUND: Variability in fluid resuscitation and difficulty recognizing early sepsis are major barriers to preventing AKI after burn injury. Expanding our understanding of the burden AKI has on the clinical course of burn patients would highlight the need for standardized protocols...
September 8, 2016: Annals of Surgery
Raymond Yost
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 11, 2016: Journal of Burn Care & Research: Official Publication of the American Burn Association
Kevin N Foster, Daniel M Caruso
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
Erica I Hodgman, Madhu Subramanian, Brett D Arnoldo, Herb A Phelan, Steven E Wolf
Since the 1940s, the resuscitation of burn patients has evolved with dramatic improvements in mortality. The most significant achievement remains the creation and adoption of formulae to calculate estimated fluid requirements to guide resuscitation. Modalities to attenuate the hypermetabolic phase of injury include pharmacologic agents, early enteral nutrition, and the aggressive approach of early excision of large injuries. Recent investigations into the genomic response to severe burns and the application of computer-based decision support tools will likely guide future resuscitation, with the goal of further reducing mortality and morbidity, and improving functional and quality of life outcomes...
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
Leopoldo C Cancio, Jose Salinas, George C Kramer
Fluid resuscitation of burn patients is commonly initiated using modified Brooke or Parkland formula. The fluid infusion rate is titrated up or down hourly to maintain adequate urine output and other endpoints. Over-resuscitation leads to morbid complications. Adherence to paper-based protocols, flow sheets, and clinical practice guidelines is associated with decreased fluid resuscitation volumes and complications. Computerized tools assist providers. Although completely autonomous closed-loop control of resuscitation has been demonstrated in animal models of burn shock, the major advantages of open-loop and decision-support systems are identifying trends, enhancing situational awareness, and encouraging burn team communication...
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
Jeffrey R Saffle
Fluid creep is the term applied to a burn resuscitation, which requires more fluid than predicted by standard formulas. Fluid creep is common today and is linked to several serious edema-related complications. Increased fluid requirements may accompany the appropriate resuscitation of massive injuries but dangerous fluid creep is also caused by overly permissive fluid infusion and the lack of colloid supplementation. Several strategies for recognizing and treating fluid creep are presented.
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
David T Harrington
More than 4 decades after the creation of the Brooke and Parkland formulas, burn practitioners still argue about which formula is the best. So it is no surprise that there is no consensus about how to resuscitate a thermally injured patient with a significant comorbidity such as heart failure or cirrhosis or how to resuscitate a patient after an electrical or inhalation injury or a patient whose resuscitation is complicated by renal failure. All of these scenarios share a common theme in that the standard rule book does not apply...
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
Elisha G Brownson, Tam N Pham, Kevin K Chung
Failed burn resuscitation can occur at various points. Early failed resuscitation will be largely caused by prehospital factors. During resuscitation, failure will present as a patient's nonresponse to adjunctive therapy. Late failure will occur in the setting of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Burn care providers must be vigilant during the resuscitation to identify a threatened resuscitation so that adjunctive therapies or rescue maneuvers can be used to convert to a successful resuscitation. However, when a patient's resuscitative course becomes unsalvageable, transition to comfort care should be taken to avoid prolongation of suffering...
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
Michael Peck, James Jeng, Amr Moghazy
Intravenous (IV) cannulation and sterile IV salt solutions may not be options in resource-limited settings (RLSs). This article presents recipes for fluid resuscitation in the aftermath of burns occurring in RLSs. Burns of 20% total body surface area (TBSA) can be resuscitated, and burns up to 40% TBSA can most likely be resuscitated, using oral resuscitation solutions (ORSs) with salt supplementation. Without IV therapy, fluid resuscitation for larger burns may only be possible with ORSs. Published global experience is limited, and the magnitude of burn injuries that successfully respond to World Health Organization ORSs is not well-described...
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
Tina L Palmieri
Children have unique physiologic, physical, psychological, and social needs compared with adults. Although adhering to the basic tenets of burn resuscitation, resuscitation of the burned child should be modified based on the child's age, physiology, and response to injury. This article outlines the unique characteristics of burned children and describes the fundamental principles of pediatric burn resuscitation in terms of airway, circulatory, neurologic, and cutaneous injury management.
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
Julie A Rizzo, Matthew P Rowan, Ian R Driscoll, Kevin K Chung, Bruce C Friedman
The inflammatory state after burn injury is characterized by an increase in capillary permeability that results in protein and fluid leakage into the interstitial space, increasing resuscitative requirements. Although the mechanisms underlying increased capillary permeability are complex, damage from reactive oxygen species plays a major role and has been successfully attenuated with antioxidant therapy in several disease processes. However, the utility of antioxidants in burn treatment remains unclear. Vitamin C is a promising antioxidant candidate that has been examined in burn resuscitation studies and shows efficacy in reducing the fluid requirements in the acute phase after burn injury...
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
Daniel M Caruso, Marc R Matthews
This article discusses commonly used methods of monitoring and determining the end points of resuscitation. Each end point of resuscitation is examined as it relates to use in critically ill burn patients. Published medical literature, clinical trials, consensus trials, and expert opinion regarding end points of resuscitation were gathered and reviewed. Specific goals were a detailed examination of each method in the critical care population and how this methodology can be used in the burn patient. Although burn resuscitation is monitored and administered using the methodology as seen in medical/surgical intensive care settings, special consideration for excessive edema formation, metabolic derangements, and frequent operative interventions must be considered...
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
Robert Cartotto, David Greenhalgh
Colloids have been used in varying capacities throughout the history of formula-based burn resuscitation. There is sound experimental evidence that demonstrates colloids' ability to improve intravascular colloid osmotic pressure, expand intravascular volume, reduce resuscitation requirements, and limit edema in unburned tissue following a major burn. Fresh frozen plasma appears to be a useful and effective immediate burn resuscitation fluid but its benefits must be weighed against its costs, and risks of viral transmission and acute lung injury...
October 2016: Critical Care Clinics
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