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jama medicine

Rita F Redberg
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 12, 2018: JAMA Internal Medicine
Mark L Wieland, Jason H Szostek, Majken T Wingo, Jason A Post, Karen F Mauck
Clinicians are challenged to identify new practice changing articles in the medical literature. To identify the practice-changing articles published in 2017 most relevant to outpatient general internal medicine, five internists reviewed the following sources: 1) titles and abstracts from internal medicine journals with the 7 highest impact factors, including New England Journal of Medicine, Lancet, Journal of the American Medical Association, British Medical Journal, Public Library of Science Medicine, Annals of Internal Medicine, and JAMA-Internal Medicine; 2) synopses and syntheses of individual studies, including collections in American College of Physicians Journal Club, Journal Watch, and Evidence-Based Medicine; 3) databases of synthesis, including Evidence Updates and the Cochrane Library...
February 26, 2018: American Journal of Medicine
Lars H Breimer, Torbjörn K Nilsson, Michael E Breimer
Declaration of conflicts of interest (COI, understood mainly as financial) in medical publications is long established. Most journals refer only to the guidelines of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) but not to those of the WAME (World Association of Medical Editors). We surveyed 17 journals and found only one (BJOG), which explicitly mentioned "religious interest" as an example of a possible COI and one other journal included "personal belief" (Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of India) as a COI...
February 7, 2018: Indian Journal of Medical Ethics
Daniel J Niven, T Jared McCormick, Sharon E Straus, Brenda R Hemmelgarn, Lianne Jeffs, Tavish R M Barnes, Henry T Stelfox
BACKGROUND: The ability to reproduce experiments is a defining principle of science. Reproducibility of clinical research has received relatively little scientific attention. However, it is important as it may inform clinical practice, research agendas, and the design of future studies. METHODS: We used scoping review methods to examine reproducibility within a cohort of randomized trials examining clinical critical care research and published in the top general medical and critical care journals...
February 21, 2018: BMC Medicine
Robert K Jackler, Noel F Ayoub
BACKGROUND AND AIM: During the mid-20th century tobacco companies placed advertisements in medical journals to entice physicians to smoke their brand and, more importantly, to recommend it to their patients. They have been little studied, in part because advertising sections in medical journals are almost universally discarded before binding. This study aimed to define the themes and techniques used in doctor-targeted tobacco advertisements that appeared in American medical journals in the mid-20th century and determine the motivations and tactics of the tobacco industry in engaging the medical profession in this way...
February 7, 2018: Addiction
Victoria Kaestner, Jonathan B Edmiston, Vinay Prasad
BACKGROUND: Despite the abundant research on financial conflict of interest regarding provider behaviour and the interpretation and results of research, little is known about the relation between these conflicts in academia and the trajectory of one's academic career. We performed a study to examine whether the presence of financial ties to drug makers among academics is associated with research productivity. METHODS: We hand-searched 3 high-impact general medical journals (New England Journal of Medicine, JAMA and The Lancet) and 3 high-impact oncology journals that publish original science (The Lancet Oncology, Journal of Clinical Oncology and Journal of the National Cancer Institute) to identify physicians based in the United States who were first or last authors on original papers on hematologic or oncologic topics that appeared in 2015...
January 30, 2018: CMAJ Open
Olga Solomon, Mary C Lawlor
Research on autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and on Alzheimer's Disease (AD) and other types of dementia describes a behaviour called 'wandering', a term that denotes movement through space lacking intention or exact destination, as when a person is disoriented or not self-aware. In the U.S., 'wandering' in both ASD and AD has been examined mostly from a management and prevention perspective. It prioritizes safety while primarily overlooking personal experiences of those who 'wander' and their families, thus limiting the range of potentially effective strategies to address this issue...
January 24, 2018: Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry
Meryl Dahan, Caroline Scemama, Raphael Porcher, David J Biau
BACKGROUND: This article corresponds to a literature review and analyze how heterogeneity of treatment (HTE) is reported and addressed in cohort studies and to evaluate the use of the different measures to HTE analysis. METHODS: prospective cohort studies, in English language, measuring the effect of a treatment (pharmacological, interventional, or other) published among 119 core clinical journals (defined by the National Library of Medicine) in the last 16 years were selected in the following data source: Medline...
January 12, 2018: BMC Medical Research Methodology
Julie De Meulemeester, Mark Fedyk, Lucas Jurkovic, Michael Reaume, Dar Dowlatshahi, Grant Stotts, Michel Shamy
OBJECTIVE: We have proposed that three scientific criteria are important to the ethical justification of RCTs: (1) they should be designed around a clear hypothesis; (2) uncertainty should exist around that hypothesis; (3) that uncertainty should be as established through a systematic review. We hypothesized that the majority of a sample of recently-published RCTs would not explicitly incorporate these criteria, therefore rendering them potentially unjustified on scientific grounds. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional analysis of all RCTs published in the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) and the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) in 2015...
January 3, 2018: Journal of Clinical Epidemiology
Ferrán Catalá-López, Adolfo Alonso-Arroyo, Matthew J Page, Brian Hutton, Rafael Tabarés-Seisdedos, Rafael Aleixandre-Benavent
BACKGROUND: The management of comorbidity and multimorbidity poses major challenges to health services around the world. Analysis of scientific research in comorbidity and multimorbidity is limited in the biomedical literature. This study aimed to map global scientific research in comorbidity and multimorbidity to understand the maturity and growth of the area during the past decades. METHODS AND FINDINGS: This was a cross-sectional analysis of the Web of Science...
2018: PloS One
Fei Liang, Xinmei Guo, Sheng Zhang, Hongxi Xue, Qiang Chen, Xichun Hu
Background: Decisions by leading journals to require trial registration and to make protocols of phase III randomized clinical trials (RCTs) publicly accessible were landmark events in clinical trial reporting. Materials and Methods: We identified phase III cancer RCTs published between 2013 and 2015 in New England Journal of Medicine ( NEJM ), The Lancet, The lancet Oncology, JAMA and Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO). Results: We identified 345 reports of phase III RCTs of which 217 (62...
November 14, 2017: Oncotarget
Chang-Zhen Gong, Wei Liu
Ten acupuncture-related articles were published in The Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) between 1998 and 2017. Five studies showed positive results in terms of the effectiveness of acupuncture/Chinese medicine (CM); five studies showed negative results. This article summarizes the acupuncturerelated clinical trials published over the last 20 years in JAMA, and addresses what seems to be a fundamental ambivalence in Western medical journals regarding the scientific validity of acupuncture/CM...
November 2017: Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine
Nadia Arif, Pietro Ghezzi
Offering breast cancer patients treatment choice has become a priority as the involvement of patients in the decision-making process is associated with improved physical and psychological outcomes. As the Internet is increasingly being used by patients as a source of medical information, it is important to evaluate the quality of information relating to breast cancer on the Internet. We analysed 200 websites returned by searching "breast cancer treatment options" in terms of their typology and treatment options described...
October 14, 2017: Breast: Official Journal of the European Society of Mastology
Michael Fishman, Wadsworth A Williams, Denise M Goodman, Lainie Friedman Ross
OBJECTIVES: To examine the gender of authors of original research in 3 high-impact pediatric journals between 2001 and 2016, given the importance of publishing on academic promotion, and to compare authorship gender with the percentage of women on editorial boards and with academic faculty composition. STUDY DESIGN: We assessed the prevalence of female first and senior (last-listed) authorship of original research articles published in 3 pediatric-focused journals Pediatrics, JAMA Pediatrics (entitled Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine until 2013), and The Journal of Pediatrics...
December 2017: Journal of Pediatrics
Ronald E Delanois, Chukwuweike U Gwam, Nicolas S Piuzzi, Morad Chughtai, Arthur L Malkani, Peter M Bonutti, Michael A Mont
BACKGROUND: Healthcare policy is often determined by well-designed studies most often published in high-impact medical journals. However, concern about the presence of publication bias against lower-extremity arthroplasty-related studies has called into question some of the validity of certain reports. There are only a few studies investigating the presence of the bias in high-impact medical journals against lower-extremity arthroplasty intervention, particularly in the Journal of American Medical Association (JAMA), New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), and the Lancet...
September 19, 2017: Journal of Arthroplasty
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 1, 2017: JAMA Internal Medicine
Carrie H Colla, Valerie A Lewis, Lee-Sien Kao, A James O'Malley, Chiang-Hua Chang, Elliott S Fisher
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 1, 2017: JAMA Internal Medicine
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 1, 2017: JAMA Internal Medicine
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 1, 2017: JAMA Internal Medicine
Jennifer S Gewandter, Michael P McDermott, Rachel A Kitt, Jenna Chaudari, James G Koch, Scott R Evans, Robert A Gross, John D Markman, Dennis C Turk, Robert H Dworkin
OBJECTIVES: Interpretation of CIs in randomised clinical trials (RCTs) with treatment effects that are not statistically significant can distinguish between results that are 'negative' (the data are not consistent with a clinically meaningful treatment effect) or 'inconclusive' (the data remain consistent with the possibility of a clinically meaningful treatment effect). This interpretation is important to ensure that potentially beneficial treatments are not prematurely abandoned in future research or clinical practice based on invalid conclusions...
July 18, 2017: BMJ Open
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