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Pelvic floor muscles

Ingrid Volløyhaug, Isabelle van Gruting, Kim van Delft, Abdul H Sultan, Ranee Thakar
AIMS: To study changes in bladder neck, urethral mobility and urinary incontinence (UI) from pregnancy to 4 years postpartum and demonstrate any association to mode of delivery or presence of levator ani muscle (LAM) injury. Secondly, we aimed to correlate bladder neck and urethral mobility to UI symptoms. METHODS: Prospective study of 180 women, recruited in their first pregnancy and followed up 1 and/or 4 years postpartum. UI symptoms were assessed with a validated questionnaire...
October 24, 2016: Neurourology and Urodynamics
Ryan E Stafford, Rafeef Aljuraifani, François Hug, Paul W Hodges
OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether increases in stiffness can be detected in the anatomical region associated with the striated urethral sphincter during voluntary activation using shear wave elastography; to identify the location and area of the stiffness increase relative to the point of greatest dorsal displacement of the mid urethra (i.e. striated urethral sphincter); and to determine the relationship between muscle stiffness and contraction intensity. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Ten healthy men participated...
October 18, 2016: BJU International
Liga Blyholder, Elizabeth Chumanov, Kathleen Carr, Bryan Heiderscheit
BACKGROUND: With a recent increase in running popularity, more women choose to run during and after pregnancy. Little research has examined exercise behaviors and postpartum health conditions of runners. HYPOTHESIS: Antenatal and postpartum exercise is beneficial in reducing certain postpartum health conditions. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 5. METHODS: A self-administered, online survey was developed that consisted of questions regarding antenatal and postpartum exercise behaviors, maternal history, and postpartum health conditions...
October 14, 2016: Sports Health
Diego Raimondo, Aly Youssef, Mohamed Mabrouk, Simona Del Forno, Valentina Martelli, Gianluigi Pilu, Nicola Rizzo, Letizia Zannoni, Roberto Paradisi, Renato Seracchioli
OBJECTIVE: Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) dysfunction seems to play an important role in the pathophysiology of pain in women with with pelvic pain syndromes, including deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE). The aim of the study was to evaluate static and dynamic morphometry of PFM in women affected by DIE, in comparison to asymptomatic control women, using three-dimensional (3D) and four-dimensional (4D) transperineal ultrasound. METHODS: A pilot, prospective study was conducted between March 2015 and November 2015, at our tertiary center...
October 8, 2016: Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology
Adil E Bharucha, Tae Hee Lee
Although pelvic pain is a symptom of several structural anorectal and pelvic disorders (eg, anal fissure, endometriosis, and pelvic inflammatory disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 3 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with pelvic pain: functional anorectal pain (ie, levator ani syndrome, unspecified anorectal pain, and proctalgia fugax), interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The first 2 conditions occur in both sexes, while the latter occurs only in men...
October 2016: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Mark S Cook, Laura Bou-Malham, Mary C Esparza, Marianna Alperin
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation is a widely utilized, but often challenging therapy for pelvic floor disorders, which are prevalent in older women. Regimens involving the use of appendicular muscles, such as the obturator internus (OI), have been developed for strengthening of the levator ani muscle (LAM). However, changes that lead to potential dysfunction of these alternative targets in older women are not well known. We hypothesized that aging negatively impacts OI architecture, the main determinant of muscle function, and intramuscular extracellular matrix (ECM), paralleling age-related alterations in LAM...
October 4, 2016: International Urogynecology Journal
M Sillem, I Juhasz-Böss, I Klausmeier, S Mechsner, F Siedentopf, E Solomayer
Introduction: Pelvic pain is a common problem in gynaecological practice. It is often unclear whether definite causality exists between reported symptoms and objective clinical findings of the female genital tract, and medical or operative treatments do not always achieve long-term resolution of symptoms. Methods: This pilot study investigated 28 patients (age 20-65, median 36.5 years) from a gynaecology practice whose only clinical finding was painful pelvic floor muscle tightness. Following standardised gynaecological and physiotherapist examination, all patients received osteopathic treatment...
September 2016: Geburtshilfe und Frauenheilkunde
Suriyan Ponnusamy, Ryan D Sullivan, Thirumagal Thiyagarajan, Heather Tillmann, Robert H Getzenberg, Ramesh Narayanan
OBJECTIVES: To evaluate two selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) (GTx-024 and GTx-027) in a post-menopausal animal model in order to determine their effect on pelvic floor muscles. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI), a prevalent condition, is represented by an involuntary leakage of urine that results, at least in part, from weakened or damaged pelvic floor muscles and is triggered by physical stress. Current treatment options are limited with no oral therapies available. The pelvic floor is rich in androgen receptor and molecules with anabolic activity including (SARMs) may serve as therapeutic options for individuals with SUI...
September 28, 2016: Journal of Cellular Biochemistry
Gena C Dunivan, Katherine E Lyons, Peter C Jeppson, Cara S Ninivaggio, Yuko M Komesu, Frances M Alba, Rebecca G Rogers
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to describe the relationship between genital hiatus (GH) and perineal body (PB) measurements with increasing pelvic organ prolapse (POP) stage in a large cohort of women referred to Urogynecology clinic for pelvic floor disorders. METHODS: Retrospective chart review of all new patients seen in an academic Urogynecology clinic between January 2007 and September 2011 was performed. Data were extracted from a standardized intake form. All patients underwent a Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POPQ) examination...
September 21, 2016: Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery
Marieke L van Engelenburg-van Lonkhuyzen, Esther M J Bols, Marc A Benninga, Wim A Verwijs, Rob A de Bie
BACKGROUND & AIMS: Functional constipation (FC) is a common childhood problem often related to pelvic floor muscle dysfunction. We compared the effectiveness of pelvic physiotherapy (PPT) vs standard medical care (SMC) in children with FC. METHODS: We performed a multicenter randomized controlled trial of 53 children (5-16 years old) with FC according to the Rome III criteria, at hospitals in The Netherlands from December 2009 to May 2014. Group allocation was concealed using a central computer system...
September 17, 2016: Gastroenterology
Aly Youssef, Marta Cavalera, Giuseppina Pacella, Ginevra Salsi, Giovanni Morganelli, Elisa Montaguti, Ilaria Cataneo, Gianluigi Pilu, Nicola Rizzo
OBJECTIVES: Caudal distension of female pelvic floor is common and results in perineal descent and a caudally curved hiatus (so called 'warping'). All the available ultrasound techniques to date however aim to reconstruct the pelvic floor using linear techniques (flat plane reconstruction). We aimed to evaluate the feasibility, reproducibility and potential usefulness of a new 3D technique, capable of reconstructing a curved plane of the levator hiatus. METHODS: We recruited a group of primiparous women to perform a 3D/4D transperineal ultrasound 3-6 months after delivery...
September 19, 2016: Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology
Louise T S Arenholt, Bodil Ginnerup Pedersen, Karin Glavind, Marianne Glavind-Kristensen, John O L DeLancey
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The paravaginal defect has been a topic of active discussion concerning what it is, how to diagnose it, its role in anterior vaginal wall prolapse, and if and how to repair it. The aim of this article was to review the existing literature on paravaginal defect and discuss its role in the anterior vaginal wall support system, with an emphasis on anatomy and imaging. METHODS: Articles related to paravaginal defects were identified through a PubMed search ending 1 July 2015...
September 17, 2016: International Urogynecology Journal
Shimon Segal, Abraham Morse, Purnima Sangal, Nathan Hirsch, Neeraj Kohli
OBJECTIVES: Pelvic floor muscle training can be effective in alleviating urinary incontinence; however, women need instruction, motivation, and feedback to gain optimal benefit from pelvic rehabilitation. The Food and Drug Administration-approved FemiScan Pelvic Floor Therapy System uses office electromyography and an in-home programmable device to provide training, motivation, and feedback between office visits. This study was undertaken to document the outcomes of women who completed an MD-supervised program using the FemiScan Pelvic Floor Therapy System...
September 16, 2016: Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery
Sivan Navot, Leonid Kalichman
Pelvic floor muscle assessment in situations of hip/groin pain in both male and female patients can be a key element in treatment success. We present herein, a 32 year old male professional cyclist, exhibiting right hip and groin pain during cycling and prolonged sitting. The pain commenced after the patient suffered a right hip severe contusion in 2013 causing a tear in the tensor fascia lata and gluteus medius muscle. The patient did not complain of pelvic floor dysfunctions. After receiving several series of conventional physical therapy for the hip/groin pain, the patient experienced partial pain relief and slight improvement of hip range of motion...
July 2016: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
In-Cheol Jeon, Oh-Yun Kwon, Jong-Hyuck Weon, Ui-Jae Hwang, Sung-Hoon Jung
CONTEXT: Prone hip extension has been recommended for strengthening the back and hip muscles. Previous studies have investigated prone hip extension conducted with subjects on the floor in the prone position. However, no study has compared three different table hip extension (THE) positions in terms of the activities of the back and hip joint muscles with lumbopelvic motion. OBJECTIVE: This study sought to identify more effective exercises for strengthening the gluteus maximus (GM) by comparing three different exercises [THE alone, THE with the abdominal drawing-in maneuver (THEA), and THEA with chair support under the knee (THEAC)] based on electromyographic muscle activity and pelvic compensation...
August 24, 2016: Journal of Sport Rehabilitation
Zsuzsanna Ilona Katalin Jármy-Di Bella, Edward Araujo Júnior, Claudinei Alves Rodrigues, Luiza Torelli, Wellington P Martins, Antonio Fernandes Moron, Manoel João Batista Castello Girão
AIM: To assess the reproducibility of pelvic floor biometric parameters by translabial three-dimensional ultrasound compared with the OmniView® reformatting technique. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study involving 47 nulliparous women without symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction. The hiatal area and right pubovisceral muscle width measurements were performed in the axial plane using both 3D ultrasound in the rendering mode and OmniView® techniques...
September 2016: Medical Ultrasonography
Cristina Ros Cerro, Eva Martínez Franco, Giulio Aniello Santoro, Maria José Palau, Pawel Wieczorek, Montserrat Espuña-Pons
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The aim was to analyze the correlation between residual anal sphincter (AS) defects and pelvic floor muscle (PFM) strength on anal incontinence (AI) in patients with a history of obstetric AS injuries (OASIS). METHODS: From September 2012 to February 2015, an observational study was conducted on a cohort of females who underwent repair of OASIS intrapartum. The degree of OASIS was scored intrapartum according to Sultan's classification...
September 9, 2016: International Urogynecology Journal
Luciana Laureano Paiva, Lia Ferla, Caroline Darski, Bruna Maciel Catarino, José Geraldo Lopes Ramos
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Urinary Incontinence (UI) in women is a condition that becomes more common with age. Pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is recommended as a first option of treatment for women with symptoms of stress urinary incontinence (SUI), mixed urinary incontinence (MUI), and for some with symptoms of urge urinary incontinence (UUI). PFMT can be performed in groups, individually, and at home, and there is no consensus as to which of the approaches is more efficient for the conservative treatment of UI...
September 9, 2016: International Urogynecology Journal
Ina Asklund, Emma Nyström, Malin Sjöström, Göran Umefjord, Hans Stenlund, Eva Samuelsson
AIMS: To evaluate the effect of a mobile app treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in women. METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, conducted 2013-2014 in Sweden. Community-dwelling adult women with ≥1 SUI episode/week recruited through our website and randomized to app treatment (n = 62) or control group (postponed treatment, n = 61). One participant from each group was lost to follow-up. Intervention was the mobile app Tät(®) with a treatment program focused on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), and information about SUI and lifestyle factors...
September 9, 2016: Neurourology and Urodynamics
Anna Lindgren, G Dunberger, A Enblom
PURPOSE: The purpose of the present study is to describe how gynaecological cancer survivors (GCS) experience incontinence in relation to quality of life, their possibilities for physical activity and exercise and their perceptions and experiences of pelvic floor muscle training. METHOD: This qualitative interview content analysis study included 13 women (48-82 age) with urinary (n = 10) or faecal (n = 3) incontinence after radiation therapy (n = 2), surgery (n = 5) and surgery and radiation therapy (n = 6) for gynaecological cancer, 0...
September 5, 2016: Supportive Care in Cancer: Official Journal of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer
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