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vaccine DoE

Mark E Westman, Richard Malik, Evelyn Hall, Matthew Harris, Margaret J Hosie, Jacqueline M Norris
OBJECTIVES: Recently, two point-of-care (PoC) feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) antibody test kits (Witness and Anigen Rapid) were reported as being able to differentiate FIV-vaccinated from FIV-infected cats at a single time point, irrespective of the gap between testing and last vaccination (0-7 years). The aim of the current study was to investigate systematically anti-FIV antibody production over time in response to the recommended primary FIV vaccination series. METHODS: First, residual plasma from the original study was tested using a laboratory-based ELISA to determine whether negative results with PoC testing were due to reduced as opposed to absent antibodies to gp40...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery
Dana Whittemore, Lili Ding, Lea E Widdice, Darron A Brown, David I Bernstein, Eduardo L Franco, Jessica A Kahn
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated racial and ethnic differences in the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) types among adult women with cervical precancers. The aim of this study was to determine whether the distribution of vaccine-targeted HPV types varies by race/ethnicity among unvaccinated young women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A secondary analysis was performed using data from four studies of sexually experienced, unvaccinated, 13-26-year-old women...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Women's Health
Peter Aaby, Henrik Ravn, Christine S Benn
BACKGROUND: World Health Organization recently reviewed the possible nonspecific effects of diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccine. The results were considered inconsistent though most studies suggested deleterious effects. We examined whether inconsistencies in results reflected differences in effect of DTP or differences in the methodology used in different studies. METHODS: If children remain unvaccinated because they are frail or if children (including dead ones) with no information on vaccination status are classified as "unvaccinated," the mortality rate becomes unnaturally high among "unvaccinated" controls...
November 2016: Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Adelaide R Murray, Rosemary M Caron
BACKGROUND: The American College Health Association's, National College Health Assessment (ACHA's NCHA) estimates 46.1% of college students reported being vaccinated in the last year. OBJECTIVE: 1) To understand the college student's knowledge, attitude, and beliefs in regards to influenza vaccination; 2) To establish recommendations in a population where high risk transmission does not consistently translate into high vaccination rates. METHODS: Utilizing the health belief model (HBM), a cross-sectional study of college student perspectives of influenza vaccination was conducted...
October 14, 2016: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health
Rama Kandasamy, Merryn Voysey, Fiona McQuaid, Karlijn de Nie, Rebecca Ryan, Olivia Orr, Ulrike Uhlig, Charles Sande, Daniel O'Connor, Andrew J Pollard
OBJECTIVE:  To identify and characterise non-specific immunological effects after routine childhood vaccines against BCG, measles, diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus. DESIGN:  Systematic review of randomised controlled trials, cohort studies, and case-control studies. DATA SOURCES:  Embase, PubMed, Cochrane library, and Trip searched between 1947 and January 2014. Publications submitted by a panel of experts in the specialty were also included...
October 13, 2016: BMJ: British Medical Journal
Wilson Kwong, Thomas Krahn, Ann Cleland, Janet Gordon, Wendy Wobeser
BACKGROUND: Current Canadian guidelines suggest that neonatal Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccination does not result in false-positive tuberculosis (TB) skin tests, despite a growing body of evidence that interferon-γ release assays may be a more specific alternative in identifying latent tuberculosis infections in vaccinated populations. We set out to evaluate the relationship between TB skin tests and interferon-γ release assays in patients who previously received neonatal BCG vaccine...
July 2016: CMAJ Open
Pierre-Louis Hervé, Delphyne Descamps, Charlotte Deloizy, Véronique Dhelft, Daphné Laubreton, Edwige Bouguyon, Abdelhak Boukadiri, Catherine Dubuquoy, Thibaut Larcher, Pierre-Henri Benhamou, Jean-François Eléouët, Nicolas Bertho, Lucie Mondoulet, Sabine Riffault
To put a Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) vaccine onto the market, new vaccination strategies combining scientific and technical innovations need to be explored. Such a vaccine would also need to be adapted to the vaccination of young children that are the principal victims of acute RSV infection. In the present project, we describe the development and the preclinical evaluation of an original epicutaneous RSV vaccine that combines two technologies: Viaskin® epicutaneous patches as a delivery platform and RSV N-nanorings (N) as a subunit antigen...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Controlled Release: Official Journal of the Controlled Release Society
Bernadett Berecz Berecz, Helga Zelenyánszki, Sára Pólya, Cecília Tamás-Nyitrai, Mária Oszvald
Vaccines produced in plants have opened up new opportunities in vaccination. Among the various categories of vaccines, the recombinant vaccine is generally regarded as the most economical and safest type because it cannot cause disease and does not require large-scale cultivation of pathogens. Due to the low cost of their cultivation, plants may represent viable alternative platforms for producing subunit vaccines. Genetic engineering of plastids is the innovation of the last three decades and has numerous benefits when compared to nuclear transformation...
October 4, 2016: Mini Reviews in Medicinal Chemistry
Biniam Mathewos Tebeje, Marina Harvie, Hong You, Alex Loukas, Donald P McManus
Schistosomiasis, caused mainly by S. mansoni, S. haematobium and S. japonicum, continues to be a serious tropical disease and public health problem resulting in an unacceptably high level of morbidity in countries where it is endemic. Praziquantel, the only drug currently available for treatment, is unable to kill developing schistosomes, it does not prevent re-infection and its continued extensive use may result in the future emergence of drug-resistant parasites. This scenario provides impetus for the development and deployment of anti-schistosome vaccines to be used as part of an integrated approach for the prevention, control and eventual elimination of schistosomiasis...
September 30, 2016: Parasites & Vectors
Martin Feuchtenberger, Arne Schäfer, Axel Philipp Nigg, Michael Rupert Kraus
BACKGROUND: Only limited data are available on the prevalence of hepatitis B in patients with proven rheumatic diseases and thus the risk of reactivation under immunosuppressive therapy. OBJECTIVE: To analyse hepatitis B serology in patients with rheumatic diseases prior to therapy. METHOD: In total, 1,338 patient records were analysed for HBsAg, HBsAb and HBcAb in a cross-sectional, single-centre study between 2011 and 2015 at first presentation...
2016: Open Rheumatology Journal
Matthias Claus, Renate Kimbel, Klaus Schöne, Stephan Letzel, Dirk-Matthias Rose
This study aims to assess serostatus and vaccination status of hepatitis A and B among staff at schools for the handicapped. We also wanted to investigate factors associated with serostatus, number of infections with hepatitis A/hepatitis B at work, and factors influencing being vaccinated or not. The cross-sectional study was carried out between August 2010 and August 2012 at 13 German schools for severely handicapped. Data were analyzed using blood samples, vaccination documents, and questionnaires. A total of 395 persons participated in our study (response: 59...
October 3, 2016: Journal of Medical Virology
April M Killikelly, Masaru Kanekiyo, Barney S Graham
The lack of a licensed vaccine for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can be partly attributed to regulatory hurdles resulting from vaccine enhanced respiratory disease (ERD) subsequent to natural RSV infection that was observed in clinical trials of formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) in antigen-naïve infants. To develop an effective vaccine that does not enhance RSV illness, it is important to understand how formalin and heat inactivation affected the antigenicity and immunogenicity of FI-RSV compared to native virus...
September 29, 2016: Scientific Reports
S Bhattacharyya, M J Ferrari
Measles elimination goals have been adopted in a range of countries, sub-regions, and regions since the WHO declared an elimination goal by 2015 or 2020. All countries attempt to achieve and maintain high coverage through routine immunization programmes. This routine strategy, however, does not ensure the elimination goal of measles. Many developed countries, such as the United States, that have succeeded in interrupting measles transmission earlier, are now experiencing outbreaks with an increasing number of cases...
September 28, 2016: Epidemiology and Infection
Dorothee Kretschmer, Dennis Hanzelmann, Andreas Peschel
Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) is regarded as the major innate immunity sensor in infections caused by the Gram-positive bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. However, previous studies on the roles of TLR2 in S. aureus infections have been elusive and in part contradictory. It has remained particularly unclear if bacterial lipoproteins, the major TLR2 ligands, could serve as antigens with intrinsic adjuvant property for the development of protective vaccines. The study by Vu et al. published in this issue of Proteomics analyzed the antibody and T-cell responses in human sera against major S...
October 2016: Proteomics
Yaniv Hanoch, Jonathan J Rolison, Alexandra M Freund
Across adulthood, people face increasingly more risky medical problems and decisions. However, little is known about changes in medical risk taking across adulthood. Therefore, the current cross-sectional study investigated age-related differences in medical risk taking with N = 317 adults aged 20-77 years using newly developed scenarios to assess medical risk taking, and additional measures designed to evaluate risk-taking behavior in the medical domain. Greater expected benefits on the Domain-Specific Risk-Taking Scale-Medical (DOSPERT-M) predicted more active risk taking, whereas higher perceived risk predicted less active risk taking...
September 23, 2016: Risk Analysis: An Official Publication of the Society for Risk Analysis
T Lurthu Reetha, J Johnson Rajeswar, T J Harikrishnan, K Sukumar, P Srinivasan, J John Kirubakaran
AIM: To study the effect of Newcastle disease (ND) oral pellet vaccine in egg production and egg quality in desi chicken. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was conducted at Veterinary University Training and Research Centre, Tiruchirapalli, Tamil Nadu. A total of 48-day-old desi chicks obtained from a private hatchery in Namakkal, Tamil Nadu, were maintained under cage system of rearing up to 52 weeks of age as per standard management practices. All the 48 chicks were divided into six groups having eight chicks in each group were subjected to different treatment regimes...
August 2016: Veterinary World
Sina Brückner, Selidji Todagbe Agnandji, Johannes Elias, Stefan Berberich, Emmanuel Bache, José Fernandes, Marguerite Massinga Loembe, Johanna Hass, Bertrand Lell, Benjamin Mordmüller, Ayola Akim Adegnika, Peter Kremsner, Meral Esen
BACKGROUND: We recently described the effect of a single-dose antihelminthic treatment on vaccine immunogenicity to a seasonal influenza vaccine. Here we report the effect of antihelminthics on the immunogenicity of a meningococcal vaccine and a cholera vaccine in primary school children living in Lambaréné, Gabon. Since infection with helminths remains a major public health problem and the influence on cognitive and physical development as well as the immunomodulatory effects are well established, we investigated if a single-dose antihelminthic treatment prior to immunization positively influences antibody titers and vaccine-specific memory B-cells...
October 17, 2016: Vaccine
Nicole G Grün, Karin Strohmeier, Veronica Moreno-Viedma, Marie Le Bras, Christine Landlinger, Karina Zeyda, Bettina Wanko, Lukas Leitner, Günther Staffler, Maximilian Zeyda, Thomas M Stulnig
Obesity causes insulin resistance via a chronic low-grade inflammation. This inflammation is characterized by elevated pro-inflammatory markers and macrophage accumulation in the adipose tissue (AT). AT inflammation is a key factor causing insulin resistance and thus type 2 diabetes, both linked to atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Osteopontin (OPN), a well-known inflammatory cytokine, is involved in obesity-linked complications including AT inflammation, insulin resistance, atherosclerosis and CVD. During inflammation, OPN is proteolytically cleaved by matrix metalloproteinases or thrombin leading to increased OPN activity...
September 14, 2016: Immunology Letters
B Pomeroy, A Gurjar, A Sipka, S Klaessig, S Salmon, R Quesnell, Y H Schukken
The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of intramammary immunization with UV-killed Escherichia coli ECC-Z on prevention of intramammary colonization after a challenge with a dose of the homologous E. coli ECC-Z live bacteria. A total of 10 cows were included in a study to evaluate the efficacy of intramammary immunization. All 10 cows received an intramammary immunization of 100 cfu of UV-killed E. coli ECC-Z bacteria into one hind quarter at the time of dry off. Approximately 2 wk before the anticipated calving date, both hind quarters of all cows were challenged with 100 cfu of live E...
September 13, 2016: Journal of Dairy Science
J Reiczigel, J Singer, Zs Lang
The risk ratio quantifies the risk of disease in a study population relative to a reference population. Standard methods of estimation and testing assume a perfect diagnostic test having sensitivity and specificity of 100%. However, this assumption typically does not hold, and this may invalidate naive estimation and testing for the risk ratio. We propose procedures that control for sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic test, given the risks are measured by proportions, as it is in cross-sectional studies or studies with fixed follow-up times...
September 9, 2016: Epidemiology and Infection
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