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Medical policy

Mohan Paudel, Sara Javanparast, Gouranga Dasvarma, Lareen Newman
OBJECTIVE AND THE CONTEXT: This paper examines the beliefs and experiences of women and their families in remote mountain villages of Nepal about perinatal sickness and death and considers the implications of these beliefs for future healthcare provision. METHODS: Two mountain villages were chosen for this qualitative study to provide diversity of context within a highly disadvantaged region. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted with 42 women of childbearing age and their family members, 15 health service providers, and 5 stakeholders...
2018: PloS One
Yuyan Gao, Li Li, David C Schwebel, Peishan Ning, Peixia Cheng, Guoqing Hu
Social medical insurance schemes are crucial for realizing universal health coverage and health equity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether and how reimbursement for injury-induced medical expenses is addressed in Chinese legislative documents relevant to social medical insurance. We retrieved legislative documents from the China National Knowledge Infrastructure and the Lawyee databases. Four types of social medical insurance schemes were included: urban employee basic medical insurance, urban resident basic medical insurance, new rural cooperative medical system, and urban and rural resident medical insurance...
2018: PloS One
Daniel Isacson, Karl Andreasson, Maziar Nikberg, Kenneth Smedh, Abbas Chabok
PURPOSE: Outpatient management without antibiotics has been shown to be safe for selected patients diagnosed with acute uncomplicated diverticulitis (AUD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on admissions, complication rates and health-care costs of the policy of outpatient treatment without using antibiotics. METHODS: The medical records of all patients diagnosed with AUD in the year before (2011) and after (2014) the implementation of outpatient management without antibiotics in Västmanland County were reviewed...
March 15, 2018: Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
Fariha Hasan, Mohammad O Khan, Mukarram Ali
Introduction Pakistan is extremely susceptible to an influenza outbreak, as it shares borders with the most affected countries, namely China and India. The medical and dental students come into direct contact with the affected population and should be aware of the risk factors and signs and symptoms pertaining to swine influenza virus (SIV). Hence, this survey was conducted to assess the knowledge, perceptions and self-care practices of the medical and dental students with regards to this pandemic. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the swine flu-related knowledge, attitudes and practices of the medical and dental students at various institutions in Karachi, Pakistan...
January 9, 2018: Curēus
Catriona Crossan, Hakim-Moulay Dehbi, Hilarie Williams, Neil Poulter, Anthony Rodgers, Stephen Jan, Simon Thom, Joanne Lord
INTRODUCTION: The 'Use of a Multi-drug Pill in Reducing cardiovascular Events' (UMPIRE) trial was a randomised controlled clinical trial evaluating the impact of a polypill strategy on adherence to indicated medication in a population with established cardiovascular disease (CVD) of or at high risk thereof. The aim of Researching the UMPIRE Processes for Economic Evaluation in the National Health Service (RUPEE NHS) is to estimate the potential health economic impact of a polypill strategy for CVD prevention within the NHS using UMPIRE trial and other relevant data...
March 14, 2018: BMJ Open
Sarah Jane Holcombe
Unsafe abortion is one of the three leading causes of maternal mortality in low-income countries; however, few countries have reformed their laws to permit safer, legal abortion, and professional medical associations have not tended to spearhead this type of reform. Support from a professional association typically carries more weight than does that from an individual medical professional. However, theory predicts and the empirical record largely reveals that medical associations shy from engagement in conflictual policymaking such as on abortion, except when professional autonomy or income is at stake...
March 12, 2018: Health Policy and Planning
Makoto Hasegawa, Michio Murakami, Yoshitake Takebayashi, Satoshi Suzuki, Hitoshi Ohto
After the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident in 2011, there was a strong demand to promote disaster preparedness approaches and health checkups for the prevention of lifestyle diseases. This study examined the yearly change in the percentage of those who prepared for disasters and who utilized health checkups in Fukushima Prefecture, and identified the factors governing disaster preparedness and utilization of health checkups. We used the public opinion survey from 2011 to 2015 ( n = 677-779 each year) on prefectural policies that is conducted every year by the Fukushima Prefecture government Public Consultation Unit...
March 14, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Jong-In Kim, Hee-Jung Kim, Jung Ju Lee, Ji Hee Jun, Tae-Young Choi, Myeong Soo Lee
BACKGROUND: The ability of acupuncture to successfully control pain has been reported in the past. However, currently no systematic reviews exist regarding the effect of acupuncture on trigeminal neuralgia (TN). This proposed review aims to evaluate the current evidence on the efficacy of acupuncture for the management of pain in TN. METHODS: A total of 11 databases were searched from their inception. These include MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, 6 Korean medical databases, and 1 Chinese Medical Database...
March 2018: Medicine (Baltimore)
Carl D Stevens
The sudden, dramatic collapse of the seven-year struggle in Congress to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act holds important lessons for all would-be reformers, including those advocating fundamental changes in medical education. In this Invited Commentary, the author draws parallels between reform initiatives in health policy and those in medical education, highlighting that, in both settings, stakeholders rarely support "repeal" in the absence of a superior replacement, even when they view the status quo as deeply flawed...
March 13, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Saad Chahine, Kulamakan Mahan Kulasegaram, Sarah Wright, Sandra Monteiro, Lawrence E M Grierson, Cassandra Barber, Stefanie S Sebok-Syer, Meghan McConnell, Wendy Yen, Andre De Champlain, Claire Touchie
There exists an assumption that improving medical education will improve patient care. While seemingly logical, this premise has rarely been investigated. In this Invited Commentary, the authors propose the use of big data to test this assumption. The authors present a few example research studies linking education and patient care outcomes and argue that using big data may more easily facilitate the process needed to investigate this assumption. The authors also propose that collaboration is needed to link educational and health care data...
March 13, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
Katherine Rouleau, Monique Bourget, Patrick Chege, Francois Couturier, Paula Godoy-Ruiz, Paul H Grand'Maison, Melanie Henry, Kerling Israel, Videsh Kapoor, Hendra Kurniawan, Louella Lobo, Mahamane Maiga, Samantha Pereira Franca, Lynda Redwood-Campbell, Jamie Rodas, Raman Sohal, Dawit Wondimagegn, Robert Woolard
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There is a limited evidentiary base on the development of family medicine in different contexts and countries. The lack of evidence impedes our ability to compare and characterize family medicine models and identify areas of success that have led to the effective provision of care. This paper offers a comparative compilation and analysis of the development of family medicine training programs in seven countries: Brazil, Canada, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Kenya, and Mali...
March 8, 2018: Family Medicine
Irene Papanicolas, Liana R Woskie, Ashish K Jha
Importance: Health care spending in the United States is a major concern and is higher than in other high-income countries, but there is little evidence that efforts to reform US health care delivery have had a meaningful influence on controlling health care spending and costs. Objective: To compare potential drivers of spending, such as structural capacity and utilization, in the United States with those of 10 of the highest-income countries (United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Australia, Japan, Sweden, France, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Denmark) to gain insight into what the United States can learn from these nations...
March 13, 2018: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
Lisa Hochstrasser, Alexander Voulgaris, Julian Möller, Tatjana Zimmermann, Regine Steinauer, Stefan Borgwardt, Undine E Lang, Christian G Huber
Background: Implementing an open door policy is a complex intervention comprising changes in therapeutic stance, team processes, and a change from locked to open doors. Recent studies show that it can lead to a reduction of seclusion and forced medication, but the role of the physical change of door status is still unclear. Aims: The aims of this study is to examine the transition from closed to predominantly open doors on a psychiatric intensive care unit (PICU) and its associations with the frequency of seclusion and forced medication...
2018: Frontiers in Psychiatry
Lisa D DiMartino, Sarah A Birken, Laura C Hanson, Justin G Trogdon, Alecia S Clary, Morris Weinberger, Katherine Reeder-Hayes, Bryan J Weiner
BACKGROUND: The implementation science literature has contributed important insights regarding the influence of formal policies and practices on health care innovation implementation, whereas informal implementation policies and practices have garnered little attention. The broader literature suggests that informal implementation policies and practices could also influence innovation use. PURPOSE: We used the Organizational Theory of Innovation Implementation to further understand the role of formal and informal implementation policies and practices as determinants of implementation effectiveness...
March 12, 2018: Health Care Management Review
Marta Trapero-Bertran, Celia Muñoz, Kathryn Coyle, Doug Coyle, Adam Lester-George, Reiner Leidl, Bertalan Németh, Kei-Long Cheung, Subhash Pokhrel, Ángel Lopez-Nicolás
AIMS: To assess the cost-effectiveness of alternative smoking cessation scenarios from the perspective of the Spanish National Health Service (NHS). DESIGN: We used the European study on Quantifying Utility of Investment in Protection from Tobacco model (EQUIPTMOD), a Markov-based state transition economic model, to estimate the return on investment (ROI) of: (a) the current provision of smoking cessation services (brief physician advice and printed self-helped material + smoking ban and tobacco duty at current levels); and (b) four alternative scenarios to complement the current provision: coverage of proactive telephone calls; nicotine replacement therapy (mono and combo) [prescription nicotine replacement therapy (Rx NRT)]; varenicline (standard duration); or bupropion...
March 13, 2018: Addiction
Marta Trapero-Bertran, Reiner Leidl, Celia Muñoz, Puttarin Kulchaitanaroaj, Kathryn Coyle, Maximilian Präger, Judit Józwiak-Hagymásy, Kei Long Cheung, Mickael Hiligsmann, Subhash Pokhrel
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Modelling return on investment (ROI) from smoking cessation interventions requires estimates of their costs and benefits. This paper describes a standardized method developed to source both economic costs of tobacco smoking and costs of implementing cessation interventions for a Europe-wide ROI model [European study on Quantifying Utility of Investment in Protection from Tobacco model (EQUIPTMOD)]. DESIGN: Focused search of administrative and published data...
March 13, 2018: Addiction
Adam Martin, Rupert Payne, Edward Cf Wilson
BACKGROUND: The National Health Service (NHS) in England spends over £9 billion on prescription medicines dispensed in primary care, of which over two-thirds is accounted for by repeat prescriptions. Recently, GPs in England have been urged to limit the duration of repeat prescriptions, where clinically appropriate, to 28 days to reduce wastage and hence contain costs. However, shorter prescriptions will increase transaction costs and thus may not be cost saving. Furthermore, there is evidence to suggest that shorter prescriptions are associated with lower adherence, which would be expected to lead to lower clinical benefit...
March 12, 2018: Applied Health Economics and Health Policy
Sanjay Chauhan, Sayeed Unisa, Beena Joshi, Ragini Kulkarni, Amarjeet Singh, Thilakavathi Subramanian, Ramendra Narayan Chaudhuri, A C Baishya, Shalini Bharat, Anushree Patil, Achhelal Pasi, Dinesh Agarwal
Background: Infertility is a neglected service component in the public health-care system in India. Objectives: This study aims to assess the availability and practices on prevention and management services for infertility in the district health system. Methodology: A cross-sectional survey of selected health facilities and the staff from 12 district hospitals (DHs), 24 community health centers (CHCs), 48 primary health centers (PHCs), and 48 subcenters was conducted using qualitative and quantitative methods...
January 2018: Indian Journal of Community Medicine
Gillian Marion Scanlan, Jennifer Cleland, Peter Johnston, Kim Walker, Nicolas Krucien, Diane Skåtun
OBJECTIVES: Multiple personal and work-related factors influence medical trainees' career decision-making. The relative value of these diverse factors is under-researched, yet this intelligence is crucially important for informing medical workforce planning and retention and recruitment policies. Our aim was to investigate the relative value of UK doctors' preferences for different training post characteristics during the time period when they either apply for specialty or core training or take time out...
March 12, 2018: BMJ Open
Aaron B Klassen, S Brent Core, Christine M Lohse, Matthew D Sztajnkrycer
Study Objectives Law enforcement is increasingly viewed as a key component in the out-of-hospital chain of survival, with expanded roles in cardiac arrest, narcotic overdose, and traumatic bleeding. Little is known about the nature of care provided by law enforcement prior to the arrival of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) assets. The purpose of the current study was to perform a descriptive analysis of events reported to a national EMS database. METHODS: This study was a descriptive analysis of the 2014 National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) public release research data set, containing EMS emergency response data from 41 states...
March 13, 2018: Prehospital and Disaster Medicine
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