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sleep pathology

Todd M Bishop, Kelsey V Simons, Deborah A King, Wilfred R Pigeon
Whether as a standalone disorder or as a symptom associated with existing pathology, the prevalence of sleep disturbance increases with age. Older adults also experience a myriad of risk factors for suicide, including depression, and have elevated rates of suicide. There is now significant evidence linking sleep disturbances to suicidal thoughts and behaviors. The use of pharmacologic means to treat insomnia (e.g., sedative hypnotics) is also commonplace among older cohorts and has been associated with suicide...
October 14, 2016: Clinical Therapeutics
Massimiliano de Zambotti, John Trinder, Harold Javitz, Ian M Colrain, Fiona C Baker
OBJECTIVE: Insomnia disorder is a risk factor for cardiovascular (CV) pathology. It is unknown whether insomnia that develops in the context of the menopausal transition (MT) impacts the CV system. We assessed nocturnal blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) profiles in women with insomnia disorder in the MT. METHODS: Twelve women meeting DSM-IV criteria for insomnia in the MT (age, mean ± SD: 50.5 ± 3.6 y) and 11 controls (age, mean ± SD: 49.0 ± 3...
October 3, 2016: Menopause: the Journal of the North American Menopause Society
Mohsen Yousefnezhad, Morteza Fotouhi, Kaveh Vejdani, Padideh Kamali-Zare
We present a universal model of brain tissue microstructure that dynamically links osmosis and diffusion with geometrical parameters of brain extracellular space (ECS). Our model robustly describes and predicts the nonlinear time dependency of tortuosity (λ=sqrt[D/D^{*}]) changes with very high precision in various media with uniform and nonuniform osmolarity distribution, as demonstrated by previously published experimental data (D = free diffusion coefficient, D^{*} = effective diffusion coefficient). To construct this model, we first developed a multiscale technique for computationally effective modeling of osmolarity in the brain tissue...
September 2016: Physical Review. E
A A Barbosa, M A L Miguel, S Tufik, F C Sabino, M S Cendoroglo, M Pedrazzoli
The objective of this study was to evaluate the alterations in sleep and circadian parameters during the aging process. The study sample comprises volunteers older than 18 up to 90 years of age that answered the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Horne and Östberg circadian preference questionnaire. We observed that the shift to morningness with increasing age is associated with a significant worsening in sleep quality. We discuss that this sleep profile characterized by morningness and worse sleep quality observed in elderly, when compared to younger people, reflects not necessarily a pathological state, but an expected profile for this age group...
October 10, 2016: Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research, Revista Brasileira de Pesquisas Médicas e Biológicas
Marco Dal Molin, Aaron Brant, Amanda L Blackford, James F Griffin, Koji Shindo, Thomas Barkley, Neda Rezaee, Ralph H Hruban, Christopher L Wolfgang, Michael Goggins
BACKGROUND: Prospective studies have identified obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as a risk factor for increased overall cancer incidence and mortality. The potential role of OSA in the risk or progression of specific cancers is not well known. We hypothesized that pathological differences in pancreatic cancers from OSA cases compared to non-OSA cases would implicate OSA in pancreatic cancer progression. METHODS: We reviewed the medical records of 1031 patients who underwent surgical resection without neoadjuvant therapy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) at Johns Hopkins Hospital between 2003 and 2014 and compared the TNM classification of their cancer and their overall survival by patient OSA status...
2016: PloS One
Shennan A Weiss, Iren Orosz, Noriko Salamon, Stephanie Moy, Linqing Wei, Maryse A Van't Klooster, Robert T Knight, Ronald M Harper, Anatol Bragin, Itzhak Fried, Jerome Engel, Richard J Staba
OBJECTIVE: Ripples (80-150 Hz) recorded from clinical macroelectrodes have been shown to be an accurate biomarker of epileptogenic brain tissue. We investigated coupling between epileptiform spike phase and ripple amplitude to better understand the mechanisms that generate this type of pathologic ripple (pRipple) event. METHODS: We quantified phase amplitude coupling (PAC) between epileptiform electroencephalography (EEG) spike phase and ripple amplitude recorded from intracranial depth macroelectrodes during episodes of sleep in 12 patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy...
October 10, 2016: Epilepsia
Xia Deng, Chun-Yan Tang, Jie Zhang, Lei Zhu, Zun-Chun Xie, Hong-Han Gong, Xiang-Zuo Xiao, Ren-Shi Xu
The cortical thickness has gained an extensive attention as a pathological alteration of sporadic Parkinson's disease (sPD), the alteration of pathological cortical thickness may distinctly contribute to the consistent clinical manifestations. Therefore, we investigated the cortical thickness correlates of clinical manifestations in the mid-stage sPD from the Han population of Chinese mainland (HPCM). A sample of 67 mid-stage sPD patients and 35 matched controls from HPCM were performed a corticometry of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the assessment of clinical manifestations including the demographic and disease-related characteristics, and underwent the final analysis of the cortical thickness correlates with the clinical manifestations...
October 6, 2016: Neuroscience Letters
David M Klyne, Mary F Barbe, Paul W Hodges
Systemic inflammation is linked with development and persistence of many pathological pain states. Although chronic phase inflammatory responses are well reported, the acute phase has received limited attention. Here we investigated circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines and C-reactive protein (CRP), and explored their relationships with symptom severity and other factors in acute low back pain (LBP). Ninety-nine individuals within two weeks of onset of acute LBP and 55 pain-free controls completed questionnaires related to their pain (visual analogue scale, VAS) and disability, behaviour, sleep quality and psychological status...
October 6, 2016: Brain, Behavior, and Immunity
Lonnele J Ball, Oxana Palesh, Lance J Kriegsfeld
Most physiological processes in the brain and body exhibit daily (circadian) rhythms coordinated by an endogenous master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus that are essential for normal health and functioning. Exposure to sunlight during the day and darkness at night optimally entrains biological rhythms to promote homeostasis and human health. Unfortunately, a major consequence of the modern lifestyle is increased exposure to sun-free environments during the day and artificial lighting at night...
October 2016: Endocrine Reviews
M Khalid-Raja, K Tzifa
OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate the activity of paediatric otolaryngology services required for children with Down's syndrome in a tertiary referral centre. METHODS: A review of the paediatric otolaryngology input for children with Down's syndrome was performed; data were obtained from the coding department for a two-year period and compared with other surgical specialties. RESULTS: Between June 2011 and May 2013, 106 otolaryngology procedures were performed on children with Down's syndrome...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Laryngology and Otology
Bradley A Edwards, Danny J Eckert, Amy S Jordan
Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a common disorder caused by not only an impaired upper airway anatomy (i.e. anatomically narrow/collapsible airway), but also by several non-anatomical factors. In this review, we summarise what is known about how each of the pathological factors that cause OSA vary according to disease severity as measured by the apnoea-hypopnoea index. Our synthesis of the available literature indicates that most of the key factors that cause OSA vary with disease severity. However, there is substantial heterogeneity such that the relative contribution of each of these traits varies both between patients and within different severities of disease...
October 4, 2016: Respirology: Official Journal of the Asian Pacific Society of Respirology
Jiali Pu, Baorong Zhang, Xinzhen Yin
Insulinoma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor. Hypersomnia as the first presentation in a patient with insulinoma is even more rare and may be easy to misdiagnose. We are herein reporting a case of insulinoma initially presenting with prolonged sleep time and extreme difficulty in waking. The abovementioned symptoms occurred every 2-3 months. Over the last 2 months, the attacks had become more frequent and severe. On computed tomography examination, a 12×9-mm cystic nodule was detected in the uncinate process of the pancreas, which was pathologically diagnosed as insulinoma...
October 2016: Molecular and Clinical Oncology
Wei-Wei Chen, Xia Zhang, Wen-Juan Huang
Pain and anxiety are the most common neurological responses to many harmful or noxious stimuli and their management clinically is often challenging. Many of the frequently used morphine-based drugs, non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and acetaminophen, while efficient for treating pain, lead to patients suffering from several unwanted side effects. Melatonin, produced from the pineal body is a hormone of darkness, is involved in the control of circadian rhythms, and exerts a number of pharmacological effects...
October 2016: Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine
Kazuko Kato, Seiko Miyata, Motoo Ando, Hiroki Matsuoka, Fumihiko Yasuma, Kunihiro Iwamoto, Naoko Kawano, Masahiro Banno, Norio Ozaki, Akiko Noda
AIMS: Short sleep duration is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Cerebral blood flow and its regulation are affected by pathological conditions commonly observed in the elderly population, such as dementia, atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, stroke and hypertension. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of sleep duration on cortical oxygenated hemoglobin (OxyHb) using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). METHODS: Seventy-three individuals (age, 70...
October 3, 2016: Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences
Magali Saint Martin, Emilia Sforza, Emilie Crawford-Achour, Lefèvre Pascal, Georges Lienard, Roche Frédéric
OBJECTIVE: Sleep breathing disorders (SBD) are the most common sleep disorders frequently under-diagnosed in elderly populations. However, it is it well known that this disorder may contribute to the age-related cognitive decline. In a cohort of healthy elderly subjects, we performed an 8-year longitudinal study to assess whether changes in cognitive function occur in untreated SBD elderly and the nocturnal factors implicated in these changes. MATERIAL/PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 559 participants of the community-based PROOF study aged 67years at the study entry and free from neurological disorders were examined...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Yuliya Boyko, Poul Jennum, Miki Nikolic, René Holst, Helle Oerding, Palle Toft
PURPOSE: To determine if improving intensive care unit (ICU) environment would enhance sleep quality, assessed by polysomnography (PSG), in critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, crossover design. The night intervention "quiet routine" protocol was directed toward improving ICU environment between 10pm and 6am. Noise levels during control and intervention nights were recorded. Patients on mechanical ventilation and able to give consent were eligible for the study...
September 10, 2016: Journal of Critical Care
Seong Hwan Kim
Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the concurrent use of three antihypertensive agents of different classes at optimal dosing, of which one should be a diuretic. Accordingly, it is not synonymous with uncontrolled hypertension. Among a variety of risk factors, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), which is a common type of sleep-disordered breathing, has been recognized a well-established risk factor for resistant hypertension. Indeed, both European and American guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension stated that OSA is a modifiable cause of resistant hypertension...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Danielle M Bartlett, Travis M Cruickshank, Anthony J Hannan, Peter R Eastwood, Alpar S Lazar, Mel R Ziman
Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by an extended polyglutamine tract in the huntingtin protein. Circadian, sleep and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis disturbances are observed in HD as early as 15 years before clinical disease onset. Disturbances in these key processes result in increased cortisol and altered melatonin release which may negatively impact on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression and contribute to documented neuropathological and clinical disease features...
September 13, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Magor L Lőrincz, Antoine R Adamantidis
Monoamines are key neuromodulators involved in a variety of physiological and pathological brain functions. Classical studies using physiological and pharmacological tools have revealed several essential aspects of monoaminergic involvement in regulating the sleep-wake cycle and influencing sensory responses but many features have remained elusive due to technical limitations. The application of optogenetic tools led to the ability of monitoring and controlling neuronal populations with unprecedented temporal precision and neurochemical specificity...
September 12, 2016: Progress in Neurobiology
Zhongxing Zhang, Maja Schneider, Marco Laures, Ming Qi, Ramin Khatami
Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS) with periodic limb movement during sleep (PLMS) are two sleep disorders characterized by repetitive respiratory or movement events associated with cortical arousals. We compared the cerebral hemodynamic changes linked to periodic apneas/hypopneas with arousals (AHA) in four OSA-patients with periodic limb movements (PLMA) with arousals in four patients with RLS-PLMS using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). AHA induced homogenous pattern of periodic fluctuations in oxygenated (HbO2) and deoxygenated (HHb) hemoglobin, i...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
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