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E-Mental health

Amy M Kilbourne, Michelle M Barbaresso, Zongshan Lai, Kristina M Nord, Margretta Bramlet, David E Goodrich, Edward P Post, Daniel Almirall, Mark S Bauer
OBJECTIVE: Persons with chronic mental disorders are disproportionately burdened with physical health conditions. We determined whether Life Goals Collaborative Care compared to usual care improves physical health in patients with mental disorders within 12 months. METHODS: This single-blind randomized controlled effectiveness study of a collaborative care model was conducted at a midwestern Veterans Affairs urban outpatient mental health clinic. Patients (N = 293 out of 474 eligible approached) with an ICD-9-CM diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder and at least 1 cardiovascular disease risk factor provided informed consent and were randomized (February 24, 2010, to April 29, 2015) to Life Goals (n = 146) or usual care (n = 147)...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Kelly B Filipkowski, Kristin E Heron, Joshua M Smyth
OBJECTIVE: This study cross-sectionally and prospectively examined the impact of adversity experienced prior to college on the health and well-being of students adjusting to their first college semester. METHODS: Two-hundred sixteen (216) first-year students completed measures of adverse life experiences, perceived stress, physical symptoms, and health-related behaviors during the first 2 weeks of college entry and again at the end of the first semester. RESULTS: Reported adversity prior to college predicted greater perceived stress and physical symptoms at college entry and an increase in physical symptoms over the semester; perceived stress mediated the prospective changes...
November 2016: American Journal of Health Behavior
P P T Jeurissen, B A Ravesteijn, R T J M Janssen, M A C Tanke
After a decade of robust growth in spending, Dutch mental healthcare is on a more stricter budgetary path since 2012. High prevalence of illness and limited spending, imply the need for efficient mental healthcare delivery.<br/> AIM: To advise how mental health care can be managed more efficiently. There will also have to be more differentiation between mild and serious psychiatric illnesses.<br/> METHOD: Review of academic articles and policy studies.<br/> RESULTS: With regard to the treatment of fairly common disorders, more attention needs to be given to integrated basic care and e-health...
2016: Tijdschrift Voor Psychiatrie
Ank E Nijhawan
The United States leads the world in incarceration, which disproportionately affects disadvantaged individuals, including those who are mentally ill, poor, homeless and racial minorities. Incarceration is disruptive to families and communities and contributes to health disparities in sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The objective of this grand rounds is to review (1) the epidemiology of incarceration in the United States, (2) the social factors which contribute to high rates of STIs in incarcerated individuals and (3) the HIV care cascade in incarcerated and recently released individuals...
October 2016: American Journal of the Medical Sciences
Brian E Lacy, Michael D Crowell, Carole Mathis, David Bauer, Leslie J Heinberg
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Gastroparesis (GP) patients suffer from recurrent symptoms of nausea, vomiting, early satiety, and abdominal pain. The impact of GP on quality of life (QoL), health care utilization and daily activities is not well understood. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Part 1: 398 adult patients (≥18 y) with documented GP (symptoms >6 mo) were surveyed to assess QoL and pain using the Short Form 36 and McGill pain questionnaires. Part 2: 491 adult GP patients were surveyed to evaluate employment status, work and daily activities, medication use, physician visits, diagnostic testing, emergency room visits, and hospitalizations related to their GP symptoms...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Peter de Jonge, Annelieke M Roest, Carmen C W Lim, Silvia E Florescu, Evelyn J Bromet, Dan J Stein, Meredith Harris, Vladimir Nakov, Jose Miguel Caldas-de-Almeida, Daphna Levinson, Ali O Al-Hamzawi, Josep Maria Haro, Maria Carmen Viana, Guilherme Borges, Siobhan O'Neill, Giovanni de Girolamo, Koen Demyttenaere, Oye Gureje, Noboru Iwata, Sing Lee, Chiyi Hu, Aimee Karam, Jacek Moskalewicz, Viviane Kovess-Masfety, Fernando Navarro-Mateu, Mark Oakley Browne, Marina Piazza, José Posada-Villa, Yolanda Torres, Margreet L Ten Have, Ronald C Kessler, Kate M Scott
CONTEXT: The scarcity of cross-national reports and the changes in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual version 5 (DSM-5) regarding panic disorder (PD) and panic attacks (PAs) call for new epidemiological data on PD and PAs and its subtypes in the general population. OBJECTIVE: To present representative data about the cross-national epidemiology of PD and PAs in accordance with DSM-5 definitions. DESIGN AND SETTING: Nationally representative cross-sectional surveys using the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview version 3...
October 24, 2016: Depression and Anxiety
Lisa Groshong, Sonja A Wilhelm Stanis, Andrew T Kaczynski, J Aaron Hipp, Gina M Besenvi
BACKGROUND: Public parks hold promise for promoting population-level PA, but studies show a significant portion of park use is sedentary. Past research has documented the effectiveness of message-based strategies for influencing diverse behaviors in park settings and for increasing PA in non-park contexts. Therefore, to inform message-based interventions (e.g., point-of-decision prompts) to increase park-based PA, the purpose of this study was to elicit insights about key attitudes, perceived norms, and personal agency that affect park use and park-based PA in low-income urban neighborhoods...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Physical Activity & Health
Matthew Blake, Joanna M Waloszek, Orli Schwartz, Monika Raniti, Julian G Simmons, Laura Blake, Greg Murray, Ronald E Dahl, Richard Bootzin, Paul Dudgeon, John Trinder, Nicholas B Allen
Objective: Sleep problems are a major risk factor for the emergence of mental health problems in adolescence. The aim of this study was to investigate the post intervention effects of a cognitive-behavioral/mindfulness-based group sleep intervention on sleep and mental health among at-risk adolescents. Method: A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted across High schools in Melbourne, Australia. One hundred forty-four adolescents (aged 12-17 years) with high levels of anxiety and sleeping difficulties, but without past or current depressive disorder, were randomized into either a sleep improvement intervention or an active control 'study skills' intervention...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
Ashley M Smith, Amanda Jensen-Doss
Improving mental health services for youth in usual care (UC) is one of the most critical issues in mental health services research. Identification of change groups in UC (e.g., recovery, improvement, no response, deterioration) can help researchers gain a richer understanding of UC and facilitate efforts to tailor UC to individuals who may not be responding well to treatment. This study used the reliable change index (RCI; Jacobson & Truax, 1991) to examine change groups within youth UC on two parent report outcome measures-symptom severity and functioning-using a large, naturalistic sample of youth (N = 672) treated in UC served at four clinics operating under a large county-wide public mental health authority...
October 24, 2016: Psychological Services
Y S Choi, E J Lee
: WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Panic disorder patients display various panic-related physical symptoms and catastrophic misinterpretation of bodily sensations, which lower their quality of life by interfering with daily activities. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a useful strategy for panic disorder patients to manage symptoms associated with inaccurate cognitive interpretation of situations resulting from the patient's cognitive vulnerability. In South Korea, however, despite the increasing prevalence of panic disorder, CBT is not a common element of nursing care plans for panic disorder patients...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
Allison R Love, Izumi Okado, Trina E Orimoto, Charles W Mueller
The present study used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to identify underlying latent factors affecting variation in community therapists' endorsement of treatment targets. As part of a statewide practice management program, therapist completed monthly reports of treatment targets (up to 10 per month) for a sample of youth (n = 790) receiving intensive in-home therapy. Nearly 75 % of youth were diagnosed with multiple co-occurring disorders. Five factors emerged: Disinhibition, Societal Rules Evasion, Social Engagement Deficits, Emotional Distress, and Management of Biodevelopmental Outcomes...
October 22, 2016: Administration and Policy in Mental Health
Stefanie Mache, Lisa Baresi, Monika Bernburg, Karin Vitzthum, David Groneberg
BACKGROUND: Dealing with work-related stress is highly prevalent for employees in Gynecology Medicine. Junior physicians, in particular, have to face high working demands and challenges while starting their medical career after graduation. Job resources (i.e., social support) and personal resources (coping skills) might reduce job strain. The evidence for supportive and effective mental health interventions for clinicians is limited. Offering psychosocial skill training for entrants in Gynecology Medicine is expected to be highly beneficial...
October 22, 2016: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics
Stephanie Agtarap, Adriel Boals, Pamela Holtz, Kenleigh Roden-Foreman, Evan E Rainey, Camilo Ruggero, Ann Marie Warren
BACKGROUND: Depression is a common mental health outcome after traumatic injury, negatively impacting physical outcomes and increasing the cost of care. Research shows that the presence and quality of support is a leading protective factor against depression post-injury; however, research is vague on the directional effects of both factors over the course of recovery. METHODS: 130 patients admitted to a Level I Trauma Center were recruited to a prospective study examining overall outcomes one-year after injury...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Affective Disorders
Sally Lindsay, Laura McAdam, Tania Mahendiran
BACKGROUND: Young men with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) live into adulthood and need specialized care. However, services for adults are fragmented. We know little about young men's experiences, their parents, and clinicians who support them as they transition to adult care. OBJECTIVE: To explore the enablers and barriers of clinicians, young men, and parents as they transition from an adult DMD clinic within a pediatric hospital to an adult health facility...
October 11, 2016: Disability and Health Journal
Wouter van Ballegooijen, Jeroen Ruwaard, Eirini Karyotaki, David D Ebert, Johannes H Smit, Heleen Riper
BACKGROUND: Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) of mental health symptoms may influence the symptoms that it measures, i.e. assessment reactivity. In the field of depression, EMA reactivity has received little attention. We aim to investigate whether EMA of depressive symptoms induces assessment reactivity. Reactivity will be operationalised as an effect of EMA on depressive symptoms measured by a retrospective questionnaire, and, secondly, as a change in response rate and variance of the EMA ratings...
October 21, 2016: BMC Psychiatry
Yaling Yang, Shantanu H Joshi, Neda Jahanshad, Paul M Thompson, Laura A Baker
Verbal and physical aggression begin early in life and steadily decline thereafter in normal development. As a result, elevated aggressive behavior in adolescence may signal atypical development and greater vulnerability for negative mental and health outcomes. Converging evidence suggests that brain disturbances in regions involved in impulse control, emotional regulation, and sensation seeking may contribute to heightened aggression. However, little is known regarding the neural mechanisms underlying subtypes of aggression (i...
October 21, 2016: Aggressive Behavior
Samuel R Chamberlain, Sarah A Redden, Jon E Grant
Excessive calorie intake constitutes a global public health concern, due to its associated range of untoward outcomes. Gambling is commonplace and gambling disorder is now considered a behavioral addiction in DSM-5. The relationships between calorie intake, gambling, and other types of putatively addictive and impulsive behaviors have received virtually no research attention. Two-hundred twenty-five young adults who gamble were recruited from two Mid-Western university communities in the United States using media advertisements...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Gambling Studies
Laila E van Lier, Jennifer Utter, Simon Denny, Mathijs Lucassen, Ben Dyson, Terryann Clark
BACKGROUND: The current article explores the associations between home gardening and dietary behaviors, physical activity, mental health, and social relationships among secondary school students in New Zealand. METHOD: Data were drawn from a national youth health and well-being survey, conducted in 2012. In total, 8,500 randomly selected students from 91 randomly selected secondary schools completed the survey. RESULTS: Two thirds of students had a vegetable garden at home and one quarter of all students participated in home gardening...
October 19, 2016: Health Promotion Practice
Shu-Min Chan, Bernadette Mazurek Melnyk, Angela Chia-Chen Chen
BACKGROUND: Taiwanese adolescents' unhealthy lifestyles (e.g., unhealthy eating and sedentary behavior) are associated with excess weight and obesity, which affect their physical and mental health (e.g., depression). Because adolescents' beliefs about healthy lifestyles predict their actual lifestyles, a valid and reliable tool to measure their beliefs about healthy lifestyles is needed. METHODS: The Healthy Lifestyle Behavior Scale (HLBS) was translated into Chinese based on recommended guidelines...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Nursing
Nan Sook Park, Yuri Jang, David A Chiriboga
OBJECTIVES: Despite a high prevalence of mental health problems, racial/ethnic minorities are often reluctant to seek mental health services. Their reluctance may be shaped by cultural beliefs and stigma about mental health. The present study examined how beliefs and stigma about depression (e.g. disbelief in depression as a health-related condition, perception of depression as a normal part of aging, and/or depression as a sign of personal weakness/family shame) pose barriers to older Korean Americans' willingness to use mental health counseling and antidepressants...
October 21, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
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