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Affective neurophysiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27926742/modeling-deficits-from-early-auditory-information-processing-to-psychosocial-functioning-in-schizophrenia
#1
Michael L Thomas, Michael F Green, Gerhard Hellemann, Catherine A Sugar, Melissa Tarasenko, Monica E Calkins, Tiffany A Greenwood, Raquel E Gur, Ruben C Gur, Laura C Lazzeroni, Keith H Nuechterlein, Allen D Radant, Larry J Seidman, Alexandra L Shiluk, Larry J Siever, Jeremy M Silverman, Joyce Sprock, William S Stone, Neal R Swerdlow, Debby W Tsuang, Ming T Tsuang, Bruce I Turetsky, David L Braff, Gregory A Light
Importance: Neurophysiologic measures of early auditory information processing (EAP) are used as endophenotypes in genomic studies and biomarkers in clinical intervention studies. Research in schizophrenia has established correlations among measures of EAP, cognition, clinical symptoms, and functional outcome. Clarifying these associations by determining the pathways through which deficits in EAP affect functioning would suggest when and where to therapeutically intervene. Objectives: To characterize the pathways from EAP to outcome and to estimate the extent to which enhancement of basic information processing might improve cognition and psychosocial functioning in schizophrenia...
December 7, 2016: JAMA Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27925475/reorganization-of-the-primary-motor-cortex-following-lower-limb-amputation-for-vascular-disease-a-pre-post-amputation-comparison
#2
Brenton Hordacre, Lynley V Bradnam, Maria Crotty
PURPOSE: This study compared bilateral corticomotor and intracortical excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1), pre- and post-unilateral transtibial amputation. METHOD: Three males aged 45, 55, and 48 years respectively who were scheduled for elective amputation and thirteen (10 male, 3 female) healthy control participants aged 58.9 (SD 9.8) were recruited. Transcranial magnetic stimulation assessed corticomotor and intracortical excitability of M1 bilaterally...
December 7, 2016: Disability and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27919795/current-and-novel-insights-into-the-neurophysiology-of-migraine-and-its-implications-for-therapeutics
#3
REVIEW
Simon Akerman, Marcela Romero-Reyes, Philip R Holland
Migraine headache and its associated symptoms have plagued humans for two millennia. It is manifest throughout the world, and affects more than 1/6 of the global population. It is the most common brain disorder, and is characterized by moderate to severe unilateral headache that is accompanied by vomiting, nausea, photophobia, phonophobia, and other hypersensitive symptoms of the senses. While there is still a clear lack of understanding of its neurophysiology, it is beginning to be understood, and it seems to suggest migraine is a disorder of brain sensory processing, characterized by a generalized neuronal hyperexcitability...
December 2, 2016: Pharmacology & Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913408/neurophysiological-mechanisms-of-cortical-plasticity-impairments-in-schizophrenia-and-modulation-by-the-nmda-receptor-agonist-d-serine
#4
Joshua T Kantrowitz, Michael L Epstein, Odeta Beggel, Stephanie Rohrig, Jonathan M Lehrfeld, Nadine Revheim, Nayla P Lehrfeld, Jacob Reep, Emily Parker, Gail Silipo, Merav Ahissar, Daniel C Javitt
Schizophrenia is associated with deficits in cortical plasticity that affect sensory brain regions and lead to impaired cognitive performance. Here we examined underlying neural mechanisms of auditory plasticity deficits using combined behavioural and neurophysiological assessment, along with neuropharmacological manipulation targeted at the N-methyl-D-aspartate type glutamate receptor (NMDAR). Cortical plasticity was assessed in a cohort of 40 schizophrenia/schizoaffective patients relative to 42 healthy control subjects using a fixed reference tone auditory plasticity task...
December 2016: Brain: a Journal of Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909072/the-mirror-illusion-increases-motor-cortex-excitability-in-children-with-and-without-hemiparesis
#5
Sebastian Grunt, Christopher J Newman, Stefanie Saxer, Maja Steinlin, Christian Weisstanner, Alain Kaelin-Lang
Background Mirror therapy provides a visual illusion of a normal moving limb by using the mirror reflection of the unaffected arm instead of viewing the paretic limb and is used in rehabilitation to improve hand function. Little is known about the mechanism underlying its effect in children with hemiparesis. Objective To investigate the effect of the mirror illusion (MI) on the excitability of the primary motor cortex (M1) in children and adolescents. Methods Twelve patients with hemiparesis (10-20 years) and 8 typically developing subjects (8-17 years) participated...
November 30, 2016: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899888/neurophysiological-characterization-of-subacute-stroke-patients-a-longitudinal-study
#6
Giuseppe Lamola, Chiara Fanciullacci, Giada Sgherri, Federica Bertolucci, Alessandro Panarese, Silvestro Micera, Bruno Rossi, Carmelo Chisari
Various degrees of neural reorganization may occur in affected and unaffected hemispheres in the early phase after stroke and several months later. Recent literature suggests to apply a stratification based on lesion location and to consider patients with cortico-subcortical and subcortical strokes separately: different lesion location may also influence therapeutic response. In this study we used a longitudinal approach to perform TMS assessment (Motor Evoked Potentials, MEP, and Silent Period, SP) and clinical evaluations (Barthel Index, Fugl-Meyer Assessment for upper limb motor function and Wolf Motor Function Test) in 10 cortical-subcortical and 10 subcortical ischemic stroke patients...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893013/proton-chemical-shift-imaging-of-the-brain-in-pediatric-and-adult-developmental-stuttering
#7
Joseph O'Neill, Zhengchao Dong, Ravi Bansal, Iliyan Ivanov, Xuejun Hao, Jay Desai, Elena Pozzi, Bradley S Peterson
Importance: Developmental stuttering is a neuropsychiatric condition of incompletely understood brain origin. Our recent functional magnetic resonance imaging study indicates a possible partial basis of stuttering in circuits enacting self-regulation of motor activity, attention, and emotion. Objective: To further characterize the neurophysiology of stuttering through in vivo assay of neurometabolites in suspect brain regions. Design, Setting, and Participants: Proton chemical shift imaging of the brain was performed in a case-control study of children and adults with and without stuttering...
November 23, 2016: JAMA Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27890531/short-term-effects-of-diabetes-on-neurosteroidogenesis-in-the-rat-hippocampus
#8
Simone Romano, Nico Mitro, Silvia Diviccaro, Roberto Spezzano, Matteo Audano, Luis Miguel Garcia-Segura, Donatella Caruso, Roberto Cosimo Melcangi
Diabetes may induce neurophysiological and structural changes in the central nervous system (i.e., diabetic encephalopathy). We here explored whether the levels of neuroactive steroids (i.e., neuroprotective agents) in the hippocampus may be altered by short-term diabetes (i.e., one month). To this aim, by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry we observed that in the experimental model of the rat raised diabetic by streptozotocin injection, one month of pathology induced changes in the levels of several neuroactive steroids, such as pregnenolone, progesterone and its metabolites (i...
November 23, 2016: Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27887564/the-drosophila-transcriptional-network-is-structured-by-microbiota
#9
Adam J Dobson, John M Chaston, Angela E Douglas
BACKGROUND: Resident microorganisms (microbiota) have far-reaching effects on the biology of their animal hosts, with major consequences for the host's health and fitness. A full understanding of microbiota-dependent gene regulation requires analysis of the overall architecture of the host transcriptome, by identifying suites of genes that are expressed synchronously. In this study, we investigated the impact of the microbiota on gene coexpression in Drosophila. RESULTS: Our transcriptomic analysis, of 17 lines representative of the global genetic diversity of Drosophila, yielded a total of 11 transcriptional modules of co-expressed genes...
November 25, 2016: BMC Genomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885162/contralesional-corticomotor-neurophysiology-in-hemiparetic-children-with-perinatal-stroke-developmental-plasticity-and-clinical-function
#10
Ephrem Zewdie, Omar Damji, Patrick Ciechanski, Trevor Seeger, Adam Kirton
Background Perinatal stroke causes most hemiparetic cerebral palsy. Ipsilateral connections from nonlesioned hemisphere to affected hand are common. The nonlesioned primary motor cortex (M1) determines function and is a potential therapeutic target but its neurophysiology is poorly understood. Objective We aimed to characterize the neurophysiological properties of the nonlesioned M1 in children with perinatal stroke and their relationship to clinical function. Methods Fifty-two participants with hemiparetic cerebral palsy and magnetic resonance imaging-confirmed perinatal stroke and 40 controls aged 8 to 18 years completed the same transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol...
November 23, 2016: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27877103/neural-underpinnings-of-decision-strategy-selection-a-review-and-a-theoretical-model
#11
Szymon Wichary, Tomasz Smolen
In multi-attribute choice, decision makers use decision strategies to arrive at the final choice. What are the neural mechanisms underlying decision strategy selection? The first goal of this paper is to provide a literature review on the neural underpinnings and cognitive models of decision strategy selection and thus set the stage for a neurocognitive model of this process. The second goal is to outline such a unifying, mechanistic model that can explain the impact of noncognitive factors (e.g., affect, stress) on strategy selection...
2016: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27870941/nonverbal-behaviors-are-associated-with-increased-vagal-activity-in-major-depressive-disorder-implications-for-the-polyvagal-theory
#12
Raquel A Fernandes, Juliana T Fiquer, Clarice Gorenstein, Lais Boralli Razza, Renério Fraguas, Lucas Borrione, Isabela M Benseñor, Paulo A Lotufo, Eduardo Miranda Dantas, Andre F Carvalho, André R Brunoni
BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with impairments in nonverbal behaviors (NVBs) and vagal activity. The polyvagal theory proposes that vagal activity regulates heart rate and NVBs by modulating a common anatomically and neurophysiologically discrete social engagement system. However, the association between these putative endophenotypes has not yet been explored. We hypothesize that in MDD, NVBs indicating positive affects and social interest and those indicating negative feelings and social disinterest could be associated with different patterns of vagal activity...
November 16, 2016: Journal of Affective Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27867415/prior-acute-mental-exertion-in-exercise-and-sport
#13
REVIEW
Fernando Lopes E Silva-Júnior, Patrick Emanuel, Jordan Sousa, Matheus Silva, Silmar Teixeira, Flávio Pires, Sérgio Machado, Oscar Arias-Carrion
INTRODUCTION: Mental exertion is a psychophysiological state caused by sustained and prolonged cognitive activity. The understanding of the possible effects of acute mental exertion on physical performance, and their physiological and psychological responses are of great importance for the performance of different occupations, such as military, construction workers, athletes (professional or recreational) or simply practicing regular exercise, since these occupations often combine physical and mental tasks while performing their activities...
2016: Clinical Practice and Epidemiology in Mental Health: CP & EMH
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27861703/short-and-long-term-perinatal-outcome-in-twin-pregnancies-affected-by-weight-discordance
#14
Cathrine Vedel, Anna Oldenburg, Katharina Worda, Helle Larsen, Anni Holmskov, Kirsten Riis Andreasen, Niels Uldbjerg, Jan Ramb, Birgit Bødker, Lillian Skibsted, Lene Sperling, Stefan Hinterberger, Lone Krebs, Helle Zingenberg, Eva-Christine Weiss, Isolde Strobl, Lone Laursen, Jeanette Tranberg Christensen, Vibeke Ersbak, Inger Stornes, Elisabeth Krampl-Bettelheim, Ann Tabor, Line Rode
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between chorionicity-specific intertwin birthweight (BW) discordance and adverse outcomes including long-term follow-up at 6, 18, and 48-60 months after term via Ages and Stages Questionnaire (ASQ). MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this secondary analysis of a cohort study (Oldenburg et al,n=1688) and a randomized controlled trial (PREDICT study,n=1045) twin pairs were divided into three groups according to chorionicity-specific BW discordance; <75(th) -percentile, 75(th) -90(th) -percentile and >90(th) -percentile...
November 18, 2016: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27859864/l-dopa-induced-dyskinesia-and-neuroinflammation-do-microglia-and-astrocytes-play-a-role
#15
REVIEW
Anna R Carta, Giovanna Mulas, Mariza Bortolanza, Terence Duarte, Elisabetta Pillai, Gilberto Fisone, Rita Raisman Vozari, Elaine Del-Bel
In Parkinson's disease (PD), l-DOPA therapy leads to the emergence of motor complications including l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). LID relies on a sequence of pre- and postsynaptic neuronal events, leading to abnormal corticostriatal neurotransmission and maladaptive changes in striatal projection neurons. In recent years, additional non-neuronal mechanisms have been proposed to contribute to LID. Among these mechanisms, considerable attention has been focused on l-DOPA-induced inflammatory responses. Microglia and astrocytes are the main actors in neuroinflammatory responses, and their double role at the interface between immune and neurophysiological responses is starting to be elucidated...
November 17, 2016: European Journal of Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27855282/amygdala-and-auditory-cortex-exhibit-distinct-sensitivity-to-relevant-acoustic-features-of-auditory-emotions
#16
Alessia Pannese, Didier Grandjean, Sascha Frühholz
Discriminating between auditory signals of different affective value is critical to successful social interaction. It is commonly held that acoustic decoding of such signals occurs in the auditory system, whereas affective decoding occurs in the amygdala. However, given that the amygdala receives direct subcortical projections that bypass the auditory cortex, it is possible that some acoustic decoding occurs in the amygdala as well, when the acoustic features are relevant for affective discrimination. We tested this hypothesis by combining functional neuroimaging with the neurophysiological phenomena of repetition suppression (RS) and repetition enhancement (RE) in human listeners...
October 31, 2016: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27853424/physical-features-of-visual-images-affect-macaque-monkey-s-preference-for-these-images
#17
Shintaro Funahashi
Animals exhibit different degrees of preference toward various visual stimuli. In addition, it has been shown that strongly preferred stimuli can often act as a reward. The aim of the present study was to determine what features determine the strength of the preference for visual stimuli in order to examine neural mechanisms of preference judgment. We used 50 color photographs obtained from the Flickr Material Database (FMD) as original stimuli. Four macaque monkeys performed a simple choice task, in which two stimuli selected randomly from among the 50 stimuli were simultaneously presented on a monitor and monkeys were required to choose either stimulus by eye movements...
2016: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27844061/lithium-responsive-seizure-like-hyperexcitability-is-caused-by-a-mutation-in-the-drosophila-voltage-gated-sodium-channel-gene-paralytic
#18
Garrett A Kaas, Junko Kasuya, Patrick Lansdon, Atsushi Ueda, Atulya Iyengar, Chun-Fang Wu, Toshihiro Kitamoto
Shudderer (Shu) is an X-linked dominant mutation in Drosophila melanogaster identified more than 40 years ago. A previous study showed that Shu caused spontaneous tremors and defects in reactive climbing behavior, and that these phenotypes were significantly suppressed when mutants were fed food containing lithium, a mood stabilizer used in the treatment of bipolar disorder (Williamson, 1982). This unique observation suggested that the Shu mutation affects genes involved in lithium-responsive neurobiological processes...
September 2016: ENeuro
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27843937/assessment-of-optimized-electrode-configuration-for-electrical-impedance-myography-using-genetic-algorithm-via-finite-element-model
#19
Somen Baidya, Mohammad A Ahad
Electrical Impedance Myography (EIM) is a noninvasive neurophysiologic technique to diagnose muscle health. Besides muscle properties, the EIM measurements vary significantly with the change of some other anatomic and nonanatomic factors such as skin fat thickness, shape and thickness of muscle, and electrode size and spacing due to its noninvasive nature of measurement. In this study, genetic algorithm was applied along with finite element model of EIM as an optimization tool in order to figure out an optimized EIM electrode setup, which is less affected by these factors, specifically muscle thickness variation, but does not compromise EIM's ability to detect muscle diseases...
2016: Journal of Medical Engineering
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27833542/adaptive-automation-triggered-by-eeg-based-mental-workload-index-a-passive-brain-computer-interface-application-in-realistic-air-traffic-control-environment
#20
Pietro Aricò, Gianluca Borghini, Gianluca Di Flumeri, Alfredo Colosimo, Stefano Bonelli, Alessia Golfetti, Simone Pozzi, Jean-Paul Imbert, Géraud Granger, Raïlane Benhacene, Fabio Babiloni
Adaptive Automation (AA) is a promising approach to keep the task workload demand within appropriate levels in order to avoid both the under- and over-load conditions, hence enhancing the overall performance and safety of the human-machine system. The main issue on the use of AA is how to trigger the AA solutions without affecting the operative task. In this regard, passive Brain-Computer Interface (pBCI) systems are a good candidate to activate automation, since they are able to gather information about the covert behavior (e...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
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