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Gene mental retardation

Li Ou, Michael J Przybilla, Chester B Whitley
Mucopolysaccharidosis type I (MPS I) is due to deficiency of α-l-iduronidase (IDUA) and subsequent storage of undegraded glycosaminoglycans (GAG). The severe form of the disease, known as Hurler syndrome, is characterized by mental retardation and neurodegeneration of unknown etiology. To identify potential biomarkers and unveil the neuropathology mechanism of MPS I disease, two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) were applied to compare proteome profiling of brains from MPS I and control mice (5-month old)...
October 11, 2016: Molecular Genetics and Metabolism
Annie L Shelton, Kim Cornish, Meaghan Clough, Sanuji Gajamange, Scott Kolbe, Joanne Fielding
Executive dysfunction has been demonstrated among premutation (PM) carriers (55-199 CGG repeats) of the Fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Further, alterations to neural activation patterns have been reported during memory and comparison based functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) tasks in these carriers. For the first time, the relationships between fMRI neural activation during an interleaved ocular motor prosaccade/antisaccade paradigm, and concurrent task performance (saccade measures of latency, accuracy and error rate) in PM females were examined...
October 14, 2016: Human Brain Mapping
S Hossein Fatemi, Timothy D Folsom, Stephanie B Liesch, Rachel E Kneeland, Mahtab Karkhane Yousefi, Paul D Thuras
Prenatal viral infection has been identified as a potential risk factor for the development of neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. Additionally, dysfunction in gamma-aminobutyric acid, Reelin, and fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP)-metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 signaling systems has also been demonstrated in these two disorders. In the current report, we have characterized the developmental profiles of selected markers for these systems in cerebella of mice born to pregnant mice infected with human influenza (H1N1) virus on embryonic day 16 or sham-infected controls using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting techniques and evaluated the presence of abnormalities in the above-mentioned markers during brain development...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Research
Ping Lu, Xiaolong Chen, Yun Feng, Qiao Zeng, Cizhong Jiang, Xianmin Zhu, Guoping Fan, Zhigang Xue
Fragile X syndrome (FXS) patients carry the expansion of over 200 CGG repeats at the promoter of fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1), leading to decreased or absent expression of its encoded fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). However, the global transcriptional alteration by FMRP deficiency has not been well characterized at single nucleotide resolution, i.e., RNA-seq. Here, we performed in-vitro neuronal differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that were derived from fibroblasts of a FXS patient (FXS-iPSC)...
October 11, 2016: Science China. Life Sciences
Yasser Vega, Sergio Arias, Irene Paradisi
Martin-Bell syndrome is mainly caused by the expansion of CGG trinucleotide repeats (>200 CGG) in the first exon of the FMR1 gene, leading to hypermethylation of the promoter region and silencing of the FMR1 protein expression. These changes are responsible for a phenotype with varying degrees of mental retardation, a long face with large and protruding ears, macroorchidism and autistic behavior. There may also be, however, patients who exhibit typical features of the syndrome without any expansion in the FMR1 gene; thus, other mechanisms affecting the expression of the FMR1 gene were assessed in 25 out of 29 ascertained patients with the typical phenotype without full mutation...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Human Genetics
W Panmontha, P Amarinthnukrowh, P Damrongphol, T Desudchit, K Suphapeetiporn, V Shotelersuk
Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Its estimated frequency is below 1 in 200,000 live births. Its clinical phenotypes include progressive neurological and mental deterioration, coarse facial features, growth retardation, visceromegaly, angiokeratomas, and seizures. The disease is caused by mutations in the FUCA1 gene that lead to deficiency of a-L-fucosidase. Here, we describe the clinical and molecular features of a Thai boy with fucosidosis. Whole exome sequencing and array-based comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed that the patient was compound heterozygous for a single base-pair deletion (c...
September 16, 2016: Genetics and Molecular Research: GMR
Samy L Habib, Noor Y Al-Obaidi, Maciej Nowacki, Katarzyna Pietkun, Barbara Zegarska, Tomasz Kloskowski, Wojciech Zegarski, Tomasz Drewa, Edward A Medina, Zhenze Zhao, Sitai Liang
Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant and multi-system genetic disorder in humans. TSC affects around 25,000 to 40,000 individuals in the United States and about 1 to 2 million individuals worldwide, with an estimated prevalence of one in 6,000 newborns. TSC occurs in all races and ethnic groups, and in both genders. TSC is caused by defects or mutations in two genes, TSC1 and TSC2. Loss of TSC1/TSC2 leads to dysregulation of mTOR, resulting in aberrant cell differentiation and development, and abnormal enlargement of cells...
2016: Journal of Cancer
Yunhui Peng, Emil Alexov
The KDM5C gene (also known as JARID1C and SMCX) is located on the X chromosome and encodes a ubiquitously expressed 1560-aa protein, which plays an important role in lysine methylation (specifically reverses tri- and di-methylation of Lys4 of histone H3). Currently, 13 missense mutations in KDM5C have been linked to X-linked mental retardation. However, the molecular mechanism of disease is currently unknown due to the experimental difficulties in expressing such large protein and the lack of experimental 3D structure...
October 1, 2016: Proteins
Hagar Mor-Shaked, Rachel Eiges
Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common heritable form of cognitive impairment. It results from a loss-of-function mutation by a CGG repeat expansion at the 5' untranslated region of the X-linked fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene. Expansion of the CGG repeats beyond 200 copies results in protein deficiency by leading to aberrant methylation of the FMR1 promoter and the switch from active to repressive histone modifications. Additionally, the CGGs become increasingly unstable, resulting in high degree of variation in expansion size between and within tissues of affected individuals...
2016: Genes
Junpei Koge, Shintaro Hayashi, Hiroo Yamaguchi, Takahisa Tateishi, Hiroyuki Murai, Jun-Ichi Kira
A 37-old-male with a history of early childhood mental retardation was admitted to our hospital. He experienced recurrent syncopes at 23 years old, and at age 35 gait disturbance and hearing impairment developed gradually and worsened over time. His grandparents were in a consanguineous marriage. He was of short stature and absent of tendon xanthomas. Neurological examinations revealed scanning speech, dysphagia, right sensorineural hearing loss, spasticity in both upper and lower extremities, and spastic gait...
September 28, 2016: Rinshō Shinkeigaku, Clinical Neurology
Andrew Ligsay, Randi J Hagerman
Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of intellectual disability, and is the leading single-gene cause of autism spectrum disorders. It is due to a loss of the fragile X mental retardation protein, which leads to molecular, behavioral, and cognitive deficits in these patients. Improvements in our understanding of its pathophysiology have led to the development of numerous targeted treatments in FXS as highlighted by metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists and gamma-Aminobutyric acid receptor modulators...
August 2016: Intractable & Rare Diseases Research
Reymundo Lozano, Atoosa Azarang, Tanaporn Wilaisakditipakorn, Randi J Hagerman
The fragile X mental retardation 1 gene, which codes for the fragile X mental retardation 1 protein, usually has 5 to 40 CGG repeats in the 5' untranslated promoter. The full mutation is the almost always the cause of fragile X syndrome (FXS). The prevalence of FXS is about 1 in 4,000 to 1 in 7,000 in the general population although the prevalence varies in different regions of the world. FXS is the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism. The understanding of the neurobiology of FXS has led to many targeted treatments, but none have cured this disorder...
August 2016: Intractable & Rare Diseases Research
Semiha Kurt, Betul Cevik, Durdane Aksoy, E Irmak Sahbaz, Aslı Gundogdu Eken, A Nazli Basak
Here, we describe the clinical features of several members of the same family diagnosed with Friedreich ataxia (FRDA) and cerebral lesions, demyelinating neuropathy, and late-age onset without a significant cardiac involvement and presenting with similar symptoms, although genetic testing was negative for the GAA repeat expansion in one patient of the family. The GAA repeat expansion in the frataxin gene was shown in all of the family members except in a young female patient. MRI revealed arachnoid cysts in two patients; MRI was consistent with both cavum septum pellucidum-cavum vergae and nodular signal intensity increase in one patient...
2016: Case Reports in Neurological Medicine
S Y Yau, C A Bostrom, J Chiu, C J Fontaine, S Sawchuk, A Meconi, R C Wortman, E Truesdell, A Truesdell, C Chiu, B N Hryciw, B D Eadie, M Ghilan, B R Christie
Fragile-X syndrome (FXS) is caused by the transcriptional repression of the Fmr1 gene resulting in loss of the Fragile-X mental retardation protein (FMRP). This leads to cognitive impairment in both male and female patients, however few studies have focused on the impact of FXS in females. Significant cognitive impairment has been reported in approximately 35% of women who exhibit a heterozygous Fmr1 gene mutation, however to date there is a paucity of information regarding the mechanistic underpinnings of these deficits...
September 19, 2016: Neurobiology of Disease
Andreea L Seritan, Kyoungmi Kim, Ian Benjamin, Ioana Seritan, Randi J Hagerman
Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is a late-onset neurodegenerative disease with motor, psychiatric, and cognitive manifestations that occurs in carriers of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1) gene premutations. This was a retrospective chart review of 196 individuals (127 men and 69 women) with FXTAS. Forty-six (23%) participants were cognitively impaired, of whom 19 (10%) had dementia. Risk factors for dementia were examined (CGG repeat size; alcohol, benzodiazepine, and opioid use; diabetes; hyperlipidemia; hypertension; hypothyroidism; obesity; sleep apnea; surgeries with general anesthesia; depression; family history of dementia)...
September 19, 2016: Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology
G Haase, N Gavert, T Brabletz, A Ben-Ze'ev
The neural L1 transmembrane cell adhesion receptor of the immunoglobulin-like family is a target gene of Wnt-β-catenin signaling in human colorectal cancer (CRC) cells and is expressed at the invasive edge of the tumor tissue. L1 overexpression in cultured CRC cells confers enhanced proliferation, motility and liver metastasis. We have analyzed the mechanisms of L1-mediated signaling in CRC cells by using various point mutations in the L1 ectodomain that are known to cause severe genetically inherited mental retardation disorders in patients...
September 19, 2016: Oncogene
Daniela Scalet, Dario Balestra, Sara Rohban, Matteo Bovolenta, Daniela Perrone, Francesco Bernardi, Stefano Campaner, Mirko Pinotti
The c.2101A>G synonymous change (p.G674G) in the gene for ATR, a key player in the DNA-damage response, has been the first identified genetic cause of Seckel Syndrome (SS), an orphan disease characterized by growth and mental retardation. This mutation mainly causes exon 9 skipping, through an ill-defined mechanism. Through ATR minigene expression studies, we demonstrated that the detrimental effect of this mutation (6±1% of correct transcripts only) depends on the poor exon 9 definition (47±4% in the ATR(wt) context), because the change was ineffective when the weak 5' or the 3' splice sites (ss) were strengthened (scores from 0...
September 14, 2016: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
Tomer Halevy, Juan-Carlos Biancotti, Ofra Yanuka, Tamar Golan-Lev, Nissim Benvenisty
Down syndrome (DS) is the leading genetic cause of mental retardation and is caused by a third copy of human chromosome 21. The different pathologies of DS involve many tissues with a distinct array of neural phenotypes. Here we characterize embryonic stem cell lines with DS (DS-ESCs), and focus on the neural aspects of the disease. Our results show that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) differentiated from five independent DS-ESC lines display increased apoptosis and downregulation of forehead developmental genes...
October 11, 2016: Stem Cell Reports
Konrad Juczewski, Helen von Richthofen, Claudia Bagni, Tansu Celikel, Gilberto Fisone, Patrik Krieger
Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a common inherited form of intellectual disability caused by the absence or reduction of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) encoded by the FMR1 gene. In humans, one symptom of FXS is hypersensitivity to sensory stimuli, including touch. We used a mouse model of FXS (Fmr1 KO) to study sensory processing of tactile information conveyed via the whisker system. In vivo electrophysiological recordings in somatosensory barrel cortex showed layer-specific broadening of the receptive fields at the level of layer 2/3 but not layer 4, in response to whisker stimulation...
September 8, 2016: Neurobiology of Disease
Jason Arsenault, Shervin Gholizadeh, Yosuke Niibori, Laura K Pacey, Sebok K Halder, Enea Koxhioni, Ayumu Konno, Hirokazu Hirai, David R Hampson
Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is absent or highly reduced in Fragile X Syndrome, a genetic disorder causing cognitive impairment and autistic behaviors. Previous proof-of-principle studies have demonstrated that restoring FMRP in the brain using viral vectors can improve pathological abnormalities in mouse models of fragile X. However, unlike small molecule drugs where the dose can readily be adjusted during treatment, viral vector-based biological therapeutic drugs present challenges in terms of achieving optimal dosing and expression levels...
September 7, 2016: Human Gene Therapy
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