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Gene intellectual disability

Laura Whitton, Donna Cosgrove, Christopher Clarkson, Denise Harold, Kimberley Kendall, Alex Richards, Kiran Mantripragada, Michael J Owen, Michael C O'Donovan, James Walters, Annette Hartmann, Betina Konte, Dan Rujescu, Michael Gill, Aiden Corvin, Stephen Rea, Gary Donohoe, Derek W Morris
Epigenetic mechanisms are an important heritable and dynamic means of regulating various genomic functions, including gene expression, to orchestrate brain development, adult neurogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. These processes when perturbed are thought to contribute to schizophrenia pathophysiology. A core feature of schizophrenia is cognitive dysfunction. For genetic disorders where cognitive impairment is more severe such as intellectual disability, there are a disproportionally high number of genes involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene transcription...
October 20, 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part B, Neuropsychiatric Genetics
Roxann Diez Gross, Ronit Gisser, Gregory Cherpes, Katie Hartman, Rishi Maheshwary
Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is caused by a genetic imprinting abnormality resulting from the lack of expression of the paternal genes at 15q11-q13. Intellectual disability, low muscle tone, and life-threatening hyperphagia are hallmarks of the phenotype. The need for the Heimlich maneuver, death from choking, and pulmonary infection occur in a disproportionally high number of persons with PWS. The widely held belief is that eating behaviors are responsible for choking and aspiration; yet, no investigation had sought to determine if swallowing impairments were present in persons with PWS...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
Ahmad Alodaib, Nara Sobreira, Wendy A Gold, Lisa G Riley, Nicole J Van Bergen, Meredith J Wilson, Bruce Bennetts, David R Thorburn, Corinne Boehm, John Christodoulou
Recent advances in next-generation sequencing strategies have led to the discovery of many novel disease genes. We describe here a non-consanguineous family with two affected boys presenting with early onset of severe axonal neuropathy, optic atrophy, intellectual disability, auditory neuropathy and chronic respiratory and gut disturbances. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on all family members and we identified compound heterozygous variants (c.[760C>A];[1528G>C];p.[(Gln254Lys);(Ala510Pro)] in the polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase 1 (PNPT1) gene in both affected individuals...
October 19, 2016: European Journal of Human Genetics: EJHG
Farah R Zahir, Tracy Tucker, Sonia Mayo, Carolyn J Brown, Emilia L Lim, Jonathan Taylor, Marco A Marra, Fadi F Hamdan, Jacques L Michaud, Jan M Friedman
The disruption of genes involved in epigenetic regulation is well known to cause Intellectual Disability (ID). We reported a custom microarray study that interrogated among others, the epigenetic regulatory gene-class, at single exon resolution. Here we elaborate on identified intragenic CNVs involving epigenetic regulatory genes; specifically discussing those in three genes previously unreported in ID etiology-ARID2, KDM3A, and ARID4B. The changes in ARID2 and KDM3A are likely pathogenic while the ARID4B variant is uncertain...
November 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
Hanna Mandel, Morad Khayat, Elana Chervinsky, Orly Elpeleg, Stavit Shalev
There is a significant level of genetic heterogeneity underlying the phenotype of nonspecific hypotonia with severe intellectual disability. Exome sequencing has proven to be a powerful tool for identifying the underlying molecular basis of such nonspecific, abnormal neurological phenotypes. Mutations in the TBCK gene have been reported associated with very poor, if any, psychomotor development, poor speech, and inability to walk independently. We describe the long-term phenotypic evolution of a severe nonspecific neurodevelopmental disorder in two siblings born to an Arab-Moslem family living in northern Israel...
October 17, 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
Joe Bathelt, Duncan Astle, Jessica Barnes, F Lucy Raymond, Kate Baker
Childhood speech and language deficits are highly prevalent and are a common feature of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, it is difficult to investigate the underlying causal pathways because many diagnostic groups have a heterogeneous aetiology. Studying disorders with a shared genetic cause and shared cognitive deficits can provide crucial insight into the cellular mechanisms and neural systems that give rise to those impairments. The current study investigated structural brain differences of individuals with mutations in ZDHHC9, which is associated with a specific neurodevelopmental phenotype including prominent speech and language impairments and intellectual disability...
2016: NeuroImage: Clinical
Nelly Redolfi, Luisa Galla, Andrea Maset, Luca Murru, Eleonora Savoia, Ilaria Zamparo, Angela Gritti, Pierre Billuart, Maria Passafaro, Claudia Lodovichi
Among the X-linked genes associated to intellectual disability, Oligophrenin-1 (OPHN1) encodes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein, a key regulator of several developmental processes, such as dendrite and spine formation and synaptic activity. Inhibitory interneurons play a key role in the development and function of neuronal circuits. Whether mutation of OPHN1 can affect morphology and synaptic properties of inhibitory interneurons remains poorly understood. To address these open questions, we studied in a well established mouse model of X-linked intellectual disability, i...
October 13, 2016: Human Molecular Genetics
Shane C Quinonez, Thomas D Gelehrter, Wendy R Uhlmann
Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are abnormal chromosomes that cannot be characterized by standard banding cytogenetic techniques. A minority of sSMC contain a neocentromere, which is an ectopic centromere lacking the characteristic alpha-satellite DNA. The phenotypic manifestations of sSMC and neocentromeric sSMC are variable and range from severe intellectual disability and multiple congenital anomalies to a normal phenotype. Here we report a patient with a diagnosis of Marfan syndrome and infertility found to have an abnormal karyotype consisting of a chromosome 15 deletion and a ring-type sSMC likely stabilized by a neocentromere derived via a mechanism initially described by Barbara McClintock in 1938...
October 14, 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
Ruifeng Li, Yifang Liu, Tingting Li, Cheng Li
Chromosomal rearrangement (CR) events have been implicated in many tumor and non-tumor human diseases. CR events lead to their associated diseases by disrupting gene and protein structures. Also, they can lead to diseases through changes in chromosomal 3D structure and gene expression. In this study, we search for CR-associated diseases potentially caused by chromosomal 3D structure alteration by integrating Hi-C and ChIP-seq data. Our algorithm rediscovers experimentally verified disease-associated CRs (polydactyly diseases) that alter gene expression by disrupting chromosome 3D structure...
October 13, 2016: Scientific Reports
Marina Diomedi, Ziv Gan-Or, Fabio Placidi, Patrick A Dion, Anna Szuto, Mario Bengala, Guy A Rouleau, Gian Luigi Gigli
Glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) deficiency syndrome (GLUT1DS) was initially described in the early 90s as a sporadic clinical condition, characterized by seizures, motor and intellectual impairment with variable clinical presentation, and without a known genetic cause. Although causative mutations in SLC2A1 were later identified and much more is known about the disease, it still remains largely underdiagnosed. In the current study, a previously described Italian family was re-analyzed using whole exome sequencing and clinically re-evaluated...
October 7, 2016: European Journal of Medical Genetics
Zoe H Larsen, Praveen Chander, Jason A Joyner, Crina M Floruta, Tess L Demeter, Jason P Weick
BACKGROUND: Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) in animal models results in excitatory-inhibitory (E/I) imbalance in neocortex due to alterations in the GABAergic interneuron (IN) differentiation and migration. Thus, E/I imbalance is a potential cause for intellectual disability in individuals with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), but whether ethanol (EtOH) changes glutamatergic and GABAergic IN specification during human development remains unknown. Here, we created a human cellular model of PAE/FASD and tested the hypothesis that EtOH exposure during differentiation of human pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons (hPSNs) would cause the aberrant production of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons, resulting in E/I imbalance...
September 26, 2016: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research
Franz Alisch, Alexander Weichert, Karim Kalache, Viola Paradiso, Ann Carolin Longardt, Christof Dame, Katrin Hoffmann, Denise Horn
Gordon syndrome or distal arthrogryposis type 3 is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by contractures of upper and lower limbs. It is distinguishable from other forms of distal arthrogryposis by cleft palate and short stature. Recently, Gordon syndrome has been associated to heterozygous mutations in the piezo-type mechanosensitive ion channel component 2 gene (PIEZO2). Different mutations of this gene also cause distal arthrogryposis type 5 and Marden-Walker syndrome. Dysfunction of this ion channel provides pleiotropic effects on joints, ocular muscles, and bone development...
October 7, 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
Yifan Zhou, Daman Kumari, Nicholas Sciascia, Karen Usdin
BACKGROUND: Fragile X syndrome (FXS), a common cause of intellectual disability and autism, results from the expansion of a CGG-repeat tract in the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene to >200 repeats. Such expanded alleles, known as full mutation (FM) alleles, are epigenetically silenced in differentiated cells thus resulting in the loss of FMRP, a protein important for learning and memory. The timing of repeat expansion and FMR1 gene silencing is controversial. METHODS: We monitored the repeat size and methylation status of FMR1 alleles with expanded CGG repeats in patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that were grown for extended period of time either as stem cells or differentiated into neurons...
2016: Molecular Autism
Kyungsoo Ha, Yiping Shen, Tyler Graves, Cheol-Hee Kim, Hyung-Goo Kim
BACKGROUND: 1q21 microdeletion syndrome is a rare contiguous gene deletion disorder with de novo or autosomal dominant inheritance patterns and its phenotypic features include intellectual disability, distinctive facial dysmorphism, microcephaly, cardiac abnormalities, and cataracts. MECP2 duplication syndrome is an X-linked recessive neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by intellectual disability, global developmental delay, and other neurological complications including late-onset seizures...
2016: Molecular Cytogenetics
Yasser Vega, Sergio Arias, Irene Paradisi
Martin-Bell syndrome is mainly caused by the expansion of CGG trinucleotide repeats (>200 CGG) in the first exon of the FMR1 gene, leading to hypermethylation of the promoter region and silencing of the FMR1 protein expression. These changes are responsible for a phenotype with varying degrees of mental retardation, a long face with large and protruding ears, macroorchidism and autistic behavior. There may also be, however, patients who exhibit typical features of the syndrome without any expansion in the FMR1 gene; thus, other mechanisms affecting the expression of the FMR1 gene were assessed in 25 out of 29 ascertained patients with the typical phenotype without full mutation...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Human Genetics
Annie T G Chiu, Lixing Zhu, Gary T K Mok, Gordon K C Leung, C B Chow, Brian H Y Chung
Costello syndrome is a type of RASopathy mapped to HRAS gene in chromosome 11, characterized by prenatal overgrowth, postnatal failure to thrive, classic facial gestalt and multisystem involvement including cardiomyopathy and intellectual disability. We present a 7 months old child with severe failure to thrive whose "subtle" facial dysmorphism at the time eluded clinical recognition of the syndrome. It was only with optimization of his nutritional status that dysmorphic features became more apparent, which affirmed the molecular diagnosis of Costello syndrome from exome sequencing...
October 2, 2016: European Journal of Medical Genetics
Baozhong Xin, Tania Cruz Marino, Julia Szekely, Josianne Leblanc, Karen Cechner, Valerie Sency, Christine Wensel, Melinda Barabas, Valérie Therriault, Heng Wang
Tatton-Brown-Rahman syndrome (TBRS) was recently described in 13 isolated cases with de novo mutations in the DNMT3A gene. This autosomal dominant condition is characterized by tall stature, intellectual disability and a distinctive facial appearance. Here, we report six cases of inherited TBRS caused by novel DNMT3A germline mutations. The affected individuals belong to two sib-ships: 4 from an Old Order Amish family in America and 2 from a French Canadian family in Canada. All of them presented with characteristic features of TBRS, including dysmorphic facial features, increased height, intellectual disability, and variable additional features...
October 4, 2016: Clinical Genetics
Hani Bagheri, Chansonette Badduke, Ying Qiao, Rita Colnaghi, Iga Abramowicz, Diana Alcantara, Christopher Dunham, Jiadi Wen, Robert S Wildin, Malgorzata J M Nowaczyk, Jennifer Eichmeyer, Anna Lehman, Bruno Maranda, Sally Martell, Xianghong Shan, Suzanne M E Lewis, Mark O'Driscoll, Cheryl Y Gregory-Evans, Evica Rajcan-Separovic
The 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome has a core phenotype consisting of intellectual disability, microcephaly, hypotonia, delayed growth, common craniofacial features, and digital anomalies. So far, more than 20 cases of 2p15p16.1 microdeletion syndrome have been reported in the literature; however, the size of the deletions and their breakpoints vary, making it difficult to identify the candidate genes. Recent reports pointed to 4 genes (XPO1, USP34, BCL11A, and REL) that were included, alone or in combination, in the smallest deletions causing the syndrome...
March 17, 2016: JCI Insight
Yun Tae Hwang, Solange Mabel Aliaga, Marta Arpone, David Francis, Xin Li, Belinda Chong, Howard Robert Slater, Carolyn Rogers, Lesley Bretherton, Matthew Hunter, Robert Heard, David Eugeny Godler
CGG repeat expansion >200 within FMR1, termed full mutation (FM), has been associated with promoter methylation, consequent silencing of gene expression and fragile X syndrome (FXS)-a common cause of intellectual disability and co-morbid autism. Unmethylated premutation (55-199 repeats) and FM alleles have been associated with fragile X related tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), a late onset neurodegenerative disorder. Here we present a 33-year-old male with FXS, with white matter changes and progressive deterioration in gait with cerebellar signs consistent with probable FXTAS; there was no evidence of any other cerebellar pathology...
October 1, 2016: American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
Simon Edvardson, Yoshiko Murakami, Thi Tuyet Mai Nguyen, Maher Shahrour, Anik St-Denis, Avraham Shaag, Nadira Damseh, Françoise Le Deist, Yenan Bryceson, Bassam Abu-Libdeh, Philippe M Campeau, Taroh Kinoshita, Orly Elpeleg
BACKGROUND: Of our 1400 exome-studied patients, 67% originate from consanguineous families. ∼80% suffer from variable degree of intellectual disability (ID). The search for disease causing genes using homozygosity mapping was progressing slowly until 2010, then markedly accelerated by the introduction of exome analysis. OBJECTIVES: To identify the disease causing mutation(s) in three patients from two unrelated families who suffered from global developmental delay, severe ID and drug-responsive seizure disorder...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Medical Genetics
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