keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

"Natural selection"

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28432052/genomic-instability-in-cancer-teetering-on-the-limit-of-tolerance
#1
REVIEW
Noemi Andor, Carlo C Maley, Hanlee P Ji
Cancer genomic instability contributes to the phenomenon of intratumoral genetic heterogeneity, provides the genetic diversity required for natural selection, and enables the extensive phenotypic diversity that is frequently observed among patients. Genomic instability has previously been associated with poor prognosis. However, we have evidence that for solid tumors of epithelial origin, extreme levels of genomic instability, where more than 75% of the genome is subject to somatic copy number alterations, are associated with a potentially better prognosis compared with intermediate levels under this threshold...
April 21, 2017: Cancer Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28431281/dengue-virus-replicates-and-accumulates-in-aedes-aegypti-salivary-glands
#2
Vincent Raquin, Louis Lambrechts
Dengue virus (DENV) is an RNA virus transmitted among humans by mosquito vectors, mainly Aedes aegypti. DENV transmission requires viral dissemination from the mosquito midgut to the salivary glands. During this process the virus undergoes several population bottlenecks, which are stochastic reductions in population size that restrict intra-host viral genetic diversity and limit the efficiency of natural selection. Despite the implications for virus transmission and evolution, DENV replication in salivary glands has not been directly demonstrated...
April 18, 2017: Virology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28431039/genomic-data-for-78-chickens-from-14-populations
#3
Diyan Li, Tiandong Che, Binlong Chen, Shilin Tian, Xuming Zhou, Guolong Zhang, Miao Li, Uma Gaur, Yan Li, Majing Luo, Long Zhang, Zhongxian Xu, Xiaoling Zhao, Huadong Yin, Yan Wang, Long Jin, Qianzi Tang, Huailiang Xu, Mingyao Yang, Rongjia Zhou, Ruiqiang Li, Qing Zhu, Mingzhou Li
Background: Since the domestication of the red jungle fowls ( Gallus gallus ) (dating back to ∼10,000 B.P.) in Asia, domestic chickens ( Gallus gallus domesticus ) have been subjected to the combined effects of natural selection and human-driven artificial selection; this has resulted in marked phenotypic diversity in a number of traits, including behavior, body composition, egg production and skin color. Population genomic variations through diversifying selection have not been fully investigated...
April 18, 2017: GigaScience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28430886/intrinsic-protein-disorder-reduces-small-scale-gene-duplicability
#4
Sanghita Banerjee, Felix Feyertag, David Alvarez-Ponce
Whereas the rate of gene duplication is relatively high, only certain duplications survive the filter of natural selection and can contribute to genome evolution. However, the reasons why certain genes can be retained after duplication whereas others cannot remain largely unknown. Many proteins contain intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), whose structures fluctuate between alternative conformational states. Due to their high flexibility, IDRs often enable protein-protein interactions and are the target of post-translational modifications...
April 19, 2017: DNA Research: An International Journal for Rapid Publication of Reports on Genes and Genomes
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28429828/genomic-clustering-of-adaptive-loci-during-parallel-evolution-of-an-australian-wildflower
#5
Federico Roda, Greg M Walter, Rick Nipper, Daniel Ortiz-Barrientos
The buildup of the phenotypic differences that distinguish species has long intrigued biologists. These differences are often inherited as stable polymorphisms that allow the co-segregation of adaptive variation within species, and facilitate the differentiation of complex phenotypes between species. It has been suggested that the clustering of adaptive loci could facilitate this process but evidence is still scarce. Here we used QTL analysis to study the genetic basis of phenotypic differentiation between coastal populations of the Australian wildflower Senecio lautus...
April 21, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28427327/analysis-of-transcriptome-data-reveals-multifactor-constraint-on-codon-usage-in-taenia-multiceps
#6
Xing Huang, Jing Xu, Lin Chen, Yu Wang, Xiaobin Gu, Xuerong Peng, Guangyou Yang
BACKGROUND: Codon usage bias (CUB) is an important evolutionary feature in genomes that has been widely observed in many organisms. However, the synonymous codon usage pattern in the genome of T. multiceps remains to be clarified. In this study, we analyzed the codon usage of T. multiceps based on the transcriptome data to reveal the constraint factors and to gain an improved understanding of the mechanisms that shape synonymous CUB. RESULTS: Analysis of a total of 8,620 annotated mRNA sequences from T...
April 20, 2017: BMC Genomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28426692/what-is-adaptation-by-natural-selection-perspectives-of-an-experimental-microbiologist
#7
REVIEW
Richard E Lenski
Ever since Darwin, the role of natural selection in shaping the morphological, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of animals and plants across generations has been central to understanding life and its diversity. New discoveries have shown with increasing precision how genetic, molecular, and biochemical processes produce and express those organismal features during an individual's lifetime. When it comes to microorganisms, however, understanding the role of natural selection in producing adaptive solutions has historically been, and sometimes continues to be, contentious...
April 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28421323/gene-expression-nucleotide-composition-and-codon-usage-bias-of-genes-associated-with-human-y-chromosome
#8
Monisha Nath Choudhury, Arif Uddin, Supriyo Chakraborty
Analysis of codon usage pattern is important to understand the genetic and evolutionary characteristics of genomes. We have used bioinformatic approaches to analyze the codon usage bias (CUB) of the genes located in human Y chromosome. Codon bias index (CBI) indicated that the overall extent of codon usage bias was low. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis suggested that approximately half of the codons out of 59 synonymous codons were most frequently used, and possessed a T or G at the third codon position...
April 18, 2017: Genetica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28418649/nature-s-selection-of-geranyl-group-as-a-trna-modification-the-effects-of-chain-length-on-base-pairing-specificity
#9
Phensinee Haruehanroengra, Sweta Vangaveti, Srivathsan V Ranganathan, Rui Wang, Alan Chen, Jia Sheng
The recently discovered geranyl modification on the 2-thio position of wobble U34 residues in tRNA(Glu), tRNA(Lys), and tRNA(Gln) in several bacteria has been found to enhance the U:G pairing specificity and reduce the frameshifting error during translation. It is a fundamentally interesting question why nature chose a C10 terpene group in tRNA systems. In this study, we explore the significance of the terpene length on base-paring stability and specificity using a series of 2-thiouridine analogues containing different lengths of carbon chains, namely, methyl- (C1), dimethylallyl- (C5), and farnesyl-modified (C15) 2-thiothymidines in a DNA duplex...
April 18, 2017: ACS Chemical Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28417082/improving-glucose-tolerance-by-muscle-damaging-exercise
#10
Chien-Te Ho, Machiko Otaka, Chia-Hua Kuo
Tissue damage is regarded as an unwanted medical condition to be avoided. However, introducing tolerable tissue damages has been used as a therapeutic intervention in traditional and complementary medicine to cure discomfort and illness. Eccentric exercise is known to cause significant necrosis and insulin resistance of skeletal muscle. The purpose of this study was to determine the magnitude of muscle damage and blood glucose responses during an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) after eccentric training in 21 young participants...
April 2017: Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28416802/rna-editing-dependent-epitranscriptome-diversity-in-cancer-stem-cells
#11
REVIEW
Qingfei Jiang, Leslie A Crews, Frida Holm, Catriona H M Jamieson
Cancer stem cells (CSCs) can regenerate all facets of a tumour as a result of their stem cell-like capacity to self-renew, survive and become dormant in protective microenvironments. CSCs evolve during tumour progression in a manner that conforms to Charles Darwin's principle of natural selection. Although somatic DNA mutations and epigenetic alterations promote evolution, post-transcriptional RNA modifications together with RNA binding protein activity (the 'epitranscriptome') might also contribute to clonal evolution through dynamic determination of RNA function and gene expression diversity in response to environmental stimuli...
April 18, 2017: Nature Reviews. Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28410570/natural-selection-drove-metabolic-specialization-of-the-chromatophore-in-paulinella-chromatophora
#12
Cecilio Valadez-Cano, Roberto Olivares-Hernández, Osbaldo Resendis-Antonio, Alexander DeLuna, Luis Delaye
BACKGROUND: Genome degradation of host-restricted mutualistic endosymbionts has been attributed to inactivating mutations and genetic drift while genes coding for host-relevant functions are conserved by purifying selection. Unlike their free-living relatives, the metabolism of mutualistic endosymbionts and endosymbiont-originated organelles is specialized in the production of metabolites which are released to the host. This specialization suggests that natural selection crafted these metabolic adaptations...
April 14, 2017: BMC Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28410373/parallel-reorganization-of-protein-function-in-the-spindle-checkpoint-pathway-through-evolutionary-paths-in-the-fitness-landscape-that-appear-neutral-in-laboratory-experiments
#13
Alex N Nguyen Ba, Bob Strome, Selma Osman, Elizabeth-Ann Legere, Taraneh Zarin, Alan M Moses
Regulatory networks often increase in complexity during evolution through gene duplication and divergence of component proteins. Two models that explain this increase in complexity are: 1) adaptive changes after gene duplication, such as resolution of adaptive conflicts, and 2) non-adaptive processes such as duplication, degeneration and complementation. Both of these models predict complementary changes in the retained duplicates, but they can be distinguished by direct fitness measurements in organisms with short generation times...
April 14, 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28410031/the-ecological-dynamics-of-natural-selection-traits-and-the-coevolution-of-community-structure
#14
Mark A McPeek
Natural selection has both genetic and ecological dynamics. The fitnesses of individuals change with their ecological context, and so the form and strength of selective agents change with abiotic factors and the phenotypes and abundances of interacting species. I use standard models of consumer-resource interactions to explore the ecological dynamics of natural selection and how various trait types influence these dynamics and the resulting structure of a community of coevolving species. Evolutionary optima favored by natural selection depend critically on the abundances of interacting species, and the traits of species can undergo dynamic cycling in limited areas of parameter space...
May 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28407107/phylogeography-of-sophora-moorcroftiana-supports-wu-s-hypothesis-on-the-origin-of-tibetan-alpine-flora
#15
Shanmei Cheng, Qiong La, Fan Lu, Takahiro Yonezawa, Ganqiang Yin, Zhiping Song, Yuguo Wang, Ji Yang, Wenju Zhang
Wu hypothesized that the Tibetan flora originated mostly from the paleotropical Tertiary flora in the Hengduan Mountains by adapting to the cold and arid environments associated with the strong uplift of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP). Here, we combine the phylogeographic history of Sophora moorcroftiana with that of S. davidii to explore the speciation of S. moorcroftiana to test this hypothesis. We collected 151 individuals from 17 populations and sequenced two chloroplast fragments and the internal transcribed spacer of rDNA...
April 12, 2017: Journal of Heredity
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28406566/how-did-the-pelvis-and-vertebral-column-become-a-functional-unit-during-the-transition-from-occasional-to-permanent-bipedalism
#16
Christine Tardieu, Kazuhiro Hasegawa, Martin Haeusler
The functional linkage between pelvis and spine remained long hidden to science. Here, we recount the history of research that led in 1992 to the discovery of the "angle of sacral incidence" by the team of G. Duval-Beaupère. This angle, formed between a ray from the hip joint center to the superior sacral surface and the perpendicular to the sacral surface, was later called pelvic incidence. Specific to each individual, pelvic incidence is tightly correlated with the degree of lumbar lordosis. It is each individual's "signature" for an efficient sagittal balance since it represents the sum of two positional parameters, sacral slope and pelvic tilt...
May 2017: Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28405579/a-survey-of-methods-and-tools-to-detect-recent-and-strong-positive-selection
#17
REVIEW
Pavlos Pavlidis, Nikolaos Alachiotis
Positive selection occurs when an allele is favored by natural selection. The frequency of the favored allele increases in the population and due to genetic hitchhiking the neighboring linked variation diminishes, creating so-called selective sweeps. Detecting traces of positive selection in genomes is achieved by searching for signatures introduced by selective sweeps, such as regions of reduced variation, a specific shift of the site frequency spectrum, and particular LD patterns in the region. A variety of methods and tools can be used for detecting sweeps, ranging from simple implementations that compute summary statistics such as Tajima's D, to more advanced statistical approaches that use combinations of statistics, maximum likelihood, machine learning etc...
December 2017: Journal of Biological Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28404772/known-mutator-alleles-do-not-markedly-increase-mutation-rate-in-clinical-saccharomyces-cerevisiae-strains
#18
Daniel A Skelly, Paul M Magwene, Brianna Meeks, Helen A Murphy
Natural selection has the potential to act on all phenotypes, including genomic mutation rate. Classic evolutionary theory predicts that in asexual populations, mutator alleles, which cause high mutation rates, can fix due to linkage with beneficial mutations. This phenomenon has been demonstrated experimentally and may explain the frequency of mutators found in bacterial pathogens. By contrast, in sexual populations, recombination decouples mutator alleles from beneficial mutations, preventing mutator fixation...
April 12, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401293/how-low-can-you-go-an-adaptive-energetic-framework-for-interpreting-basal-metabolic-rate-variation-in-endotherms
#19
REVIEW
David L Swanson, Andrew E McKechnie, François Vézina
Adaptive explanations for both high and low body mass-independent basal metabolic rate (BMR) in endotherms are pervasive in evolutionary physiology, but arguments implying a direct adaptive benefit of high BMR are troublesome from an energetic standpoint. Here, we argue that conclusions about the adaptive benefit of BMR need to be interpreted, first and foremost, in terms of energetics, with particular attention to physiological traits on which natural selection is directly acting. We further argue from an energetic perspective that selection should always act to reduce BMR (i...
April 11, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28399181/evolutionary-emergence-of-angiogenesis-in-avascular-tumors-using-a-spatial-public-goods-game
#20
Javad Salimi Sartakhti, Mohammad Hossein Manshaei, David Basanta, Mehdi Sadeghi
Natural selection in cancer often results in the emergence of increasingly malignant tumor cells that display many if not all of the hallmarks of cancer. One of the most important traits acquired during cancer progression is angiogenesis. Tumor cells capable of secreting pro-angiogenic factors can be seen as cooperators where the improved oxygenation, nutrient delivery and waste disposal resulting from angiogenesis could be seen as a public good. Under this view, the relatively costly secretion of molecular signals required to orchestrate angiogenesis would be undertaken exclusively by cooperating tumor cells but the benefits of angiogenesis would be felt by neighboring tumor cells regardless of their contribution to the process...
2017: PloS One
keyword
keyword
93612
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"