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"Natural selection"

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28725414/snps-across-time-and-space-population-genomic-signatures-of-founder-events-and-epizootics-in-the-house-finch-haemorhous-mexicanus
#1
Allison J Shultz, Allan J Baker, Geoffrey E Hill, Paul M Nolan, Scott V Edwards
Identifying genomic signatures of natural selection can be challenging against a background of demographic changes such as bottlenecks and population expansions. Here, we disentangle the effects of demography from selection in the House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) using samples collected before and after a pathogen-induced selection event. Using ddRADseq, we genotyped over 18,000 SNPs across the genome in native pre-epizootic western US birds, introduced birds from Hawaii and the eastern United States, post-epizootic eastern birds, and western birds sampled across a similar time span...
October 2016: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28725383/sexual-selection-impacts-brain-anatomy-in-frogs-and-toads
#2
Yu Zeng, Shang Ling Lou, Wen Bo Liao, Robert Jehle, Alexander Kotrschal
Natural selection is a major force in the evolution of vertebrate brain size, but the role of sexual selection in brain size evolution remains enigmatic. At least two opposing schools of thought predict a relationship between sexual selection and brain size. Sexual selection should facilitate the evolution of larger brains because better cognitive abilities may aid the competition for mates. However, it may also restrict brain size evolution due to energetic trade-offs between brain tissue and sexually selected traits...
October 2016: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28724593/less-is-more-independent-loss-of-function-ocimene-synthase-alleles-parallel-pollination-syndrome-diversification-in-monkeyflowers-mimulus
#3
Foen Peng, Kelsey J R P Byers, Harvey D Bradshaw
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Pollinator-mediated selection on flower phenotypes (e.g., shape, color, scent) is key to understanding the adaptive radiation of angiosperms, many of which have evolved specialized relationships with a particular guild of animal pollinators (e.g., birds, bats, moths, bees). E-β-Ocimene, a monoterpene produced by OCIMENE SYNTHASE (OS) in Mimulus lewisii, is a floral scent important in attracting the species' bumblebee pollinators. The taxa closely related to M. lewisii have evolved several different pollination syndromes, including hummingbird pollination and self pollination (autogamy)...
July 19, 2017: American Journal of Botany
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28722119/sexual-selection-on-spontaneous-mutations-strengthens-the-between-sex-genetic-correlation-for-fitness
#4
Scott L Allen, Katrina McGuigan, Tim Connallon, Mark W Blows, Stephen F Chenoweth
A proposed benefit to sexual selection is that it promotes purging of deleterious mutations from populations. For this benefit to be realised, sexual selection, which is usually stronger on males, must purge mutations deleterious to both sexes. Here, we experimentally test the hypothesis that sexual selection on males purges deleterious mutations that affect both male and female fitness. We measured male and female fitness in two panels of spontaneous mutation-accumulation lines of the fly, Drosophila serrata, each established from a common ancestor...
July 19, 2017: Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28720580/detecting-ancient-positive-selection-in-humans-using-extended-lineage-sorting
#5
Séphane Peyégne, Michael James Boyle, Michael Dannemann, Kay Prüfer
Natural selection that affected modern humans early in their evolution has likely shaped some of the traits that set present-day humans apart from their closest extinct and living relatives. The ability to detect ancient natural selection in the human genome could provide insights into the molecular basis for these human-specific traits. Here, we introduce a method for detecting ancient selective sweeps by scanning for extended genomic regions where our closest extinct relatives, Neandertals and Denisovans, fall outside of the present-day human variation...
July 18, 2017: Genome Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28717880/environmental-exposure-does-not-explain-putative-maladaptation-in-road-adjacent-populations
#6
Steven P Brady
While the ecological consequences of roads are well described, little is known of their role as agents of natural selection, which can shape adaptive and maladaptive responses in populations influenced by roads. This knowledge gap persists despite a growing appreciation for the influence of evolution in human-altered environments. There, insights indicate that natural selection typically results in local adaptation. Thus, populations influenced by road-induced selection should evolve fitness advantages in their local environment...
July 17, 2017: Oecologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28717385/changes-in-diet-associated-with-cancer-an-evolutionary-perspective
#7
Frédéric Thomas, Sophie Rome, Frédéric Mery, Erika Dawson, Jacques Montagne, Peter A Biro, Christa Beckmann, François Renaud, Robert Poulin, Michel Raymond, Beata Ujvari
Changes in diet are frequently correlated with the occurrence and progression of malignant tumors (i.e., cancer) in both humans and other animals, but an integrated conceptual framework to interpret these changes still needs to be developed. Our aim is to provide a new perspective on dietary changes in tumor-bearing individuals by adapting concepts from parasitology. Dietary changes may occur alongside tumor progression for several reasons: (i) as a pathological side effect with no adaptive value, (ii) as the result of self-medication by the host to eradicate the tumor and/or to slow down its progression, (iii) as a result of host manipulation by the tumor that benefits its progression, and finally (iv) as a host tolerance strategy, to alleviate and repair damages caused by tumor progression...
August 2017: Evolutionary Applications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28716928/support-for-redistribution-is-shaped-by-compassion-envy-and-self-interest-but-not-a-taste-for-fairness
#8
Daniel Sznycer, Maria Florencia Lopez Seal, Aaron Sell, Julian Lim, Roni Porat, Shaul Shalvi, Eran Halperin, Leda Cosmides, John Tooby
Why do people support economic redistribution? Hypotheses include inequity aversion, a moral sense that inequality is intrinsically unfair, and cultural explanations such as exposure to and assimilation of culturally transmitted ideologies. However, humans have been interacting with worse-off and better-off individuals over evolutionary time, and our motivational systems may have been naturally selected to navigate the opportunities and challenges posed by such recurrent interactions. We hypothesize that modern redistribution is perceived as an ancestral scene involving three notional players: the needy other, the better-off other, and the actor herself...
July 17, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28716118/evolutionary-and-genetic-analysis-of-the-vp2-gene-of-canine-parvovirus
#9
Gairu Li, Senlin Ji, Xiaofeng Zhai, Yuxiang Zhang, Jie Liu, Mengyan Zhu, Jiyong Zhou, Shuo Su
BACKGROUND: Canine parvovirus (CPV) type 2 emerged in 1978 in the USA and quickly spread among dog populations all over the world with high morbidity. Although CPV is a DNA virus, its genomic substitution rate is similar to some RNA viruses. Therefore, it is important to trace the evolution of CPV to monitor the appearance of mutations that might affect vaccine effectiveness. RESULTS: Our analysis shows that the VP2 genes of CPV isolated from 1979 to 2016 are divided into six groups: GI, GII, GIII, GIV, GV, and GVI...
July 17, 2017: BMC Genomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28714571/domestication-and-fitness-in-the-wild-a-multivariate-view
#10
Jarle Tufto
Domesticated species continually escaping and interbreeding with wild relatives impose a migration load on wild populations. As domesticated stocks become increasingly different as a result of artificial and natural selection in captivity, fitness of escapees in the wild is expected to decline, reducing the effective rate of migration into wild populations. Recent theory suggest that this may alleviate and eventually eliminate the resulting migration load. I develop a multivariate model of trait and wild fitness evolution resulting from the joint effects of artificial and natural selection in the captive environment...
July 17, 2017: Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28711136/population-genetics-and-natural-selection-in-rheumatic-disease
#11
REVIEW
Paula S Ramos
Human genetic diversity is the result of population genetic forces. This genetic variation influences disease risk and contributes to health disparities. Natural selection is an important influence on human genetic variation. Because immune and inflammatory function genes are enriched for signals of positive selection, the prevalence of rheumatic disease-risk alleles seen in different populations is partially the result of differing selective pressures (eg, due to pathogens). This review summarizes the genetic regions associated with susceptibility to different rheumatic diseases and concomitant evidence for natural selection, including known agents of selection exerting selective pressure in these regions...
August 2017: Rheumatic Diseases Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709943/propagation-and-control-of-gene-expression-noise-with-non-linear-translation-kinetics
#12
J David Van Dyken
Gene expression is a stochastic process involving small numbers of molecules. As a consequence, cells in a clonal population vary randomly and sometimes substantially from one another in the concentration of mRNA and protein species, a phenomenon known as gene expression noise. Previous theoretical models of gene expression noise assumed that translation is first-order (linear) in mRNA concentration, leading to unfiltered propagation of mRNA noise to the protein level. Here I consider the biological ramifications of relaxing this assumption...
July 11, 2017: Journal of Theoretical Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28708460/tolerance-to-hypercarbia-is-repeatable-and-related-to-a-component-of-the-metabolic-phenotype-in-a-freshwater-fish
#13
Caleb T Hasler, Ian A Bouyoucos, Cory D Suski
Freshwater fish may be exposed to high levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) because of several actions, including anesthesia and high levels of aquatic respiration and potentially as the result of using high-CO2 plumes as a barrier to the movements of invasive fishes. Metabolic phenotype can potentially drive how freshwater fish respond to high CO2. We therefore quantified how tolerance (measured using time to equilibrium loss [ELT]) was driven by metabolic phenotype in a cosmopolitan freshwater fish species, Micropterus salmoides...
September 2017: Physiological and Biochemical Zoology: PBZ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28704536/phylogeography-in-nassarius-mud-snails-complex-patterns-in-congeneric-species
#14
Chuanliang Pu, Haitao Li, Aijia Zhu, Yiyong Chen, Yan Zhao, Aibin Zhan
One major goal for phylogeographical studies is to elucidate respective roles of multiple evolutionary and ecological forces that shape the current distribution patterns. In marine and coastal ecosystems, it has been generated a common realization that species with enormous population size and pelagic larval stages can disperse across broad geographical scales, leading to weak or even no phylogeographical structure across large geographical scales. However, the violation of such realization has been frequently reported, and it remains largely unexplored on mechanisms responsible for various phylogeographical patterns observed in different species at varied geographical scales...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28703361/non-decoupled-morphological-evolution-of-the-fore-and-hindlimb-of-sabretooth-predators
#15
Alberto Martín-Serra, Borja Figueirido, Paul Palmqvist
Specialized organisms are useful for exploring the combined effects of selection of functional traits and developmental constraints on patterns of phenotypic integration. Sabretooth predators are one of the most interesting examples of specialization among mammals. Their hypertrophied, sabre-shaped upper canines and their powerfully built forelimbs have been interpreted as adaptations to a highly specialized predatory behaviour. Given that the elongated and laterally compressed canines of sabretooths were more vulnerable to fracture than the shorter canines of conical-tooth cats, it has been long hypothesized that the heavily muscled forelimbs of sabretooths were used for immobilizing prey before developing a quick and precise killing bite...
July 12, 2017: Journal of Anatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28702123/the-evolution-of-life-a-metadarwinian-integrative-approach
#16
Arnold De Loof
It is undeniably very logical to first formulate an unambiguous definition of "Life" before engaging in defining the parameters instrumental to Life's evolution. Because nearly everybody assumes, erroneously in my opinion, that catching Life's essence in a single sentence is impossible, this way of thinking remained largely unexplored in evolutionary theory. Upon analyzing what exactly happens at the transition from "still alive" to "just dead," the following definition emerged. What we call "Life" (L) is an activity...
2017: Communicative & Integrative Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701910/the-impact-of-ecological-niche-on-adaptive-flexibility-of-sensory-circuitry
#17
REVIEW
Sarah L Pallas
Evolution and development are interdependent, particularly with regard to the construction of the nervous system and its position as the machine that produces behavior. On the one hand, the processes directing development and plasticity of the brain provide avenues through which natural selection can sculpt neural cell fate and connectivity, and on the other hand, they are themselves subject to selection pressure. For example, mutations that produce heritable perturbations in neuronal birth and death rates, transcription factor expression, or availability of axon guidance factors within sensory pathways can markedly affect the development of form and thus the function of stimulus decoding circuitry...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701907/adaptation-of-human-skin-color-in-various-populations
#18
REVIEW
Lian Deng, Shuhua Xu
BACKGROUND: Skin color is a well-recognized adaptive trait and has been studied extensively in humans. Understanding the genetic basis of adaptation of skin color in various populations has many implications in human evolution and medicine. DISCUSSION: Impressive progress has been made recently to identify genes associated with skin color variation in a wide range of geographical and temporal populations. In this review, we discuss what is currently known about the genetics of skin color variation...
2018: Hereditas
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701566/chronotype-variation-drives-night-time-sentinel-like-behaviour-in-hunter-gatherers
#19
David R Samson, Alyssa N Crittenden, Ibrahim A Mabulla, Audax Z P Mabulla, Charles L Nunn
Sleep is essential for survival, yet it also represents a time of extreme vulnerability to predation, hostile conspecifics and environmental dangers. To reduce the risks of sleeping, the sentinel hypothesis proposes that group-living animals share the task of vigilance during sleep, with some individuals sleeping while others are awake. To investigate sentinel-like behaviour in sleeping humans, we investigated activity patterns at night among Hadza hunter-gatherers of Tanzania. Using actigraphy, we discovered that all subjects were simultaneously scored as asleep for only 18 min in total over 20 days of observation, with a median of eight individuals awake throughout the night-time period; thus, one or more individuals was awake (or in light stages of sleep) during 99...
July 12, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701503/taking-chances-and-making-mistakes-non-genetic-phenotypic-heterogeneity-and-its-consequences-for-surviving-in-dynamic-environments
#20
REVIEW
Coco van Boxtel, Johan H van Heerden, Niclas Nordholt, Phillipp Schmidt, Frank J Bruggeman
Natural selection has shaped the strategies for survival and growth of microorganisms. The success of microorganisms depends not only on slow evolutionary tuning but also on the ability to adapt to unpredictable changes in their environment. In principle, adaptive strategies range from purely deterministic mechanisms to those that exploit the randomness intrinsic to many cellular and molecular processes. Depending on the environment and selective pressures, particular strategies can lie somewhere along this continuum...
July 2017: Journal of the Royal Society, Interface
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