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nurse experience

Patricia M Davidson, Cynda Hylton Rushton, Jennifer Dotzenrod, Christina A Godack, Deborah Baker, Marie N Nolan
The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability and requires schools to provide reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. The profession of nursing is striving for diversity and inclusion, but barriers still exist to realizing accommodations for people with disabilities. Promoting disclosure, a supportive and enabling environment, resilience, and realistic expectations are important considerations if we are to include among our ranks health professionals who can understand, based on similar life experiences of disability, a fuller range of perspectives of the patients we care for...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Cheryl Tatano Beck, Jamie Rivera, Robert K Gable
INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this mixed-methods study was to investigate vicarious posttraumatic growth in certified nurse-midwives (CNMs) who have struggled after attending traumatic births. Vicarious posttraumatic growth involves positive changes in a clinician's life due to caring for patients who are traumatized. METHODS: A convergent parallel mixed-methods design was used. The American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) sent out e-mails to all CNM members with a link to the electronic survey...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Midwifery & Women's Health
Carolyn Talbott, Lynn Watson, Joseph Tariman, Matthew Sorenson
AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the acceptability and usability of a standardized communication tool for nurses. BACKGROUND AND SIGNIFICANCE: Communication is key in healthcare. On a daily, if not hourly, basis, nursing staff is inundated with new information regarding tools and resources, practice changes and the work environment. However, there is currently no standardized messaging or delivery method to effectively communicate new information...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Clinical Nursing
Sharon K Fickley, Ray R Mishler, Amelia S Black, Pam B DeGuzman
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this research is to explore donors' perspectives on support of nursing excellence in a community hospital. BACKGROUND: Philanthropic support is rapidly becoming critical to support nursing excellence in hospitals, including continuing education, nursing research, and professional development. However, no research has examined the experience of private donors who support nursing programs in community hospitals. METHODS: Structured interviews were conducted with individuals with a history of providing significant financial support (gifts >$50 000) targeted specifically for nursing in a 176- bed community hospital in the southeastern United States...
November 2016: Journal of Nursing Administration
Heather K Spence Laschinger, Emily A Read
OBJECTIVE: This study examined the influence of authentic leadership, person-job fit with 6 areas of worklife, and civility norms on coworker incivility and burnout among new graduate nurses. BACKGROUND: New graduate nurses report experiencing high levels of workplace incivility from coworkers, which has been found to negatively impact their job and career satisfaction and increase their intention to leave. The role of civility norms in preventing burnout and subsequent exposure to incivility from coworkers has yet to be examined among new graduate nurses...
November 2016: Journal of Nursing Administration
Regina Cunningham, Mary K Walton
Increasingly, healthcare organizations are adopting patient and family advisory councils as a key strategy to create a culture grounded in patient- and family-centered principles and improve the patient experience. In the 1st of a 3-part series, the chief nurse executive and the director of patient- and family-centered care at a Magnet®-designated academic medical center discuss how a stronger patient voice can lead to better care and improved clinical outcomes. The authors examine ways in which the Magnet culture helped drive change and offer tips to establish a successful patient and family advisory council...
November 2016: Journal of Nursing Administration
Stephanie Lacefield Lewis
BACKGROUND: The survival rate for infants born with life-threatening problems has improved greatly over the last few decades. Nevertheless, infants still die in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) every day. Despite existing standards of care, some aspects of end-of-life care (EOLC) are still not delivered consistently. Little is known about how NICU nurses' individual experiences affect EOLC. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to explore, through lived and told stories, the affective, interactional, and meaning-related responses that NICU nurses have while caring for dying infants and their families...
October 24, 2016: Advances in Neonatal Care: Official Journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses
L Lafferty, C Treloar, J Guthrie, G M Chambers, T Butler
Prisoner populations are characterized by high rates of hepatitis C (HCV), up to thirty times that of the general population in Australia. Within Australian prisons, less than 1% of eligible inmates access treatment. Public health strategies informed by social capital could be important in addressing this inequality in access to HCV treatment. Twenty-eight male inmates participated in qualitative interviews across three correctional centres in New South Wales, Australia. All participants had recently tested as HCV RNA positive or were receiving HCV treatment...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Viral Hepatitis
Hasan M Al-Dorzi, Abdulaziz S Aldawood, Raymond Khan, Salim Baharoon, John D Alchin, Amal A Matroud, Sameera M Al Johany, Hanan H Balkhy, Yaseen M Arabi
BACKGROUND: Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) has caused several hospital outbreaks, including a major outbreak at King Abdulaziz Medical City, a 940-bed tertiary-care hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (August-September 2015). To learn from our experience, we described the critical care response to the outbreak. METHODS: This observational study was conducted at the Intensive Care Department which covered 5 ICUs with 60 single-bedded rooms. We described qualitatively and, as applicable, quantitatively the response of intensive care services to the outbreak...
December 2016: Annals of Intensive Care
Greg Ogrinc, Emily S Cohen, Robertus van Aalst, Beth Harwood, Ellyn Ercolano, Karyn D Baum, Adam J Pattison, Anne C Jones, Louise Davies, Al West
BACKGROUND : Integrating teaching and hands-on experience in quality improvement (QI) may increase the learning and the impact of resident QI work. OBJECTIVE : We sought to determine the clinical and educational impact of an integrated QI curriculum. METHODS : This clustered, randomized trial with early and late intervention groups used mixed methods evaluation. For almost 2 years, internal medicine residents from Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center on the inpatient teams at the White River Junction VA participated in the QI curriculum...
October 2016: Journal of Graduate Medical Education
K A Hollowed, T E Travis, M H Jordan, J W Shupp
Education of first responders and referring medical professionals is considered vital to high-quality burn care. Prior to 1999, the community education program at The Burn Center of MedStar Washington Hospital Center (MWHC) was staffed by ICU nurses who volunteered their time. As the program became more popular in the mid-1990s, the requests for lectures exceeded the capacity of a volunteer program. A request to hospital administration for a full-time education coordinator position was rejected in the climate of budget cut-backs and declining reimbursement...
December 31, 2015: Annals of Burns and Fire Disasters
Erica E M Maurits, Anke J E de Veer, Peter P Groenewegen, Anneke L Francke
BACKGROUND: Professional misconduct in healthcare, a (generally) lasting situation in which patients are at risk or actually harmed, can jeopardise the health and well-being of patients and the quality of teamwork. Two types of professional misconduct can be distinguished: misconduct associated with incompetence and that associated with impairment. This study aimed to (1) quantify home-care nursing staff's experiences with actual or possible professional misconduct; (2) provide insight into the difficulty home-care nursing staff experience in reporting suspicions of professional misconduct within the organisation and whether this is related to the individual characteristics of nursing staff; and (3) show which aspects of professional practice home-care nursing staff consider important in preventing professional misconduct...
2016: BMC Nursing
Leila Katirayi, Caspian Chouraya, Kwashie Kudiabor, Mohammed Ali Mahdi, Mary Pat Kieffer, Karen Marie Moland, Thorkild Tylleskar
BACKGROUND: Swaziland has one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in sub-Saharan Africa, 26 % of the adult population is infected with HIV. The prevalence is highest among pregnant women, at 41.1 %. According to Swaziland's prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) guidelines, approximately 50 % of pregnant women are eligible for antiretroviral therapy (ART) by CD4 criteria (<350 cells/ml). Studies have shown that most mother-to-child transmission and postnatal deaths occur among women who are eligible for ART...
October 24, 2016: BMC Public Health
Daniel Schwarzkopf, Hendrik Rüddel, Daniel O Thomas-Rüddel, Jörg Felfe, Bernhard Poidinger, Claudia T Matthäus-Krämer, Christiane S Hartog, Frank Bloos
OBJECTIVES: Perceiving nonbeneficial treatment is stressful for ICU staff and may be associated with burnout. We aimed to investigate predictors and consequences of perceived nonbeneficial treatment and to compare nurses and junior and senior physicians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, multicenter paper-pencil survey on personal and work-related characteristics, perceived nonbeneficial treatment, burnout, and intention to leave the job. SETTING: Convenience sample of 23 German ICUs...
October 21, 2016: Critical Care Medicine
Erin Grgurich, Cynthia Arnemann, Kim Amon, Rose Horton, Jestin N Carlson
As neonatal endotracheal intubation (ETI) is a low-frequency, high-consequence event, it is essential that providers have access to resources to aid in ETI. We sought to determine the impact of video laryngoscopy (VL) with just-in-time training on intubation outcomes over direct laryngoscopy (DL) when performed by neonatal nurses. We conducted a prospective, randomized, crossover study with neonatal nurses employed at a level 2 neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Nurses performed both DL and VL on a neonatal mannequin using a CMAC (Karl Storz Corp, Tuttlingen, Germany) either with the assistance of the screen (VL) or without (DL)...
October 2016: Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing
Ruben Posada-Gómez, Roberto A Montaño-Murillo, Albino Martínez-Sibaja, Giner Alor-Hernández, Alberto A Aguilar-Lasserre, Miriam C Reyes-Fernández
PURPOSE: One of the most important aspects in neuromotor rehabilitation is the need of feedback for patients. The rehabilitation system's efficiency relies on the therapist's judgment, who tells the patient whether he/she is performing the exercises correctly. This process may be quite subjective, because it depends on the therapist's personal opinion. On the other hand, recent studies have shown that vibrotactile biofeedback can improve the effectiveness of interaction as it is a very helpful tool in the physiological process of neuromotor rehabilitation...
October 24, 2016: Rehabilitation Nursing: the Official Journal of the Association of Rehabilitation Nurses
Y S Choi, E J Lee
: WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Panic disorder patients display various panic-related physical symptoms and catastrophic misinterpretation of bodily sensations, which lower their quality of life by interfering with daily activities. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a useful strategy for panic disorder patients to manage symptoms associated with inaccurate cognitive interpretation of situations resulting from the patient's cognitive vulnerability. In South Korea, however, despite the increasing prevalence of panic disorder, CBT is not a common element of nursing care plans for panic disorder patients...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
Jill N Peltzer, Lisa Ogawa, Susan Tusher, Rose Farnan, Mary M Gerkovich
HIV-infected individuals are at risk for psychological distress, including depression, sadness, and suicidality. The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to examine 22 HIV-infected African American women's experiences of psychological distress and use of coping strategies. Data were collected through in-person one-on-one interviews until conceptual saturation was reached. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. Four themes were found: (a) psychoemotional suffering, (b) contextual factors negatively influence the everydayness of living with HIV infection, (c) HIV-related stigma perpetuates isolation and loneliness, and (d) creating a safe haven...
October 1, 2016: Journal of the Association of Nurses in AIDS Care: JANAC
Monique Jenkins, Carol F Roye, Keville Frederickson
PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to gain a deeper understanding of the lived experiences of underserved minority sexually active teenaged girls' successful avoidance of unwanted pregnancy. DESIGN AND METHOD: Merleau-Ponty's methodology and van Manen's method of doing phenomenological research guided and facilitated the process of the study. 7 participants were eligible and all of them were interviewed for this study. RESULTS: Six main themes were identified: sense of emotional safety; sense of being free from a potential pregnancy; feeling supported by family and friends; connections built on trust and communication; regard for self through self-esteem and self-confidence; and sense of having life goals...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Pediatric Nursing
Cathleen E Willging, Amy E Green, Mary M Ramos
BACKGROUND: Reducing youth suicide in the United States (U.S.) is a national public health priority, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer or questioning (LGBTQ) youth are at elevated risk. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) endorses six evidence-based (EB) strategies that center on meeting the needs of LGBTQ youth in schools; however, fewer than 6 % of U.S. schools implement all of them. The proposed intervention model, "RLAS" (Implementing School Nursing Strategies to Reduce LGBTQ Adolescent Suicide), builds on the Exploration, Preparation, Implementation, and Sustainment (EPIS) conceptual framework and the Dynamic Adaptation Process (DAP) to implement EB strategies in U...
October 22, 2016: Implementation Science: IS
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