Read by QxMD icon Read

Immigrant health

Geetanjali D Datta, Alexandra Blair, Marie-Pierre Sylvestre, Lise Gauvin, Mylene Drouin, Marie-Helene Mayrand
In Canada, over 40% of invasive cervical cancers occur among women who have never been screened. Although 12% of Canadian women have never been screened, this number can be as high as 43% among certain social groups. Little is published on factors associated with screening uptake and inequalities among women residing in Quebec. Four waves of the Canadian Community Health Survey (2003, 2005, 2008, 2012, N = 6393) were utilized to assess lifetime screening and screening in the previous 3 years among women residing in Montreal...
March 7, 2018: Preventive Medicine
Jennifer Hebert-Beirne, Sarah Gabriella Hernandez, Jennifer Felner, Jessica Schwiesow, Anna Mayer, Kevin Rak, Noel Chávez, Yvette Castañeda, Joan Kennelly
In predominately immigrant neighborhoods, the nuances of immigrant life in the ethnic enclave have important, yet underappreciated impact on community health. The complexities of immigrant experiences are essential to unpacking and addressing the impact of acculturative processes on observed racial, ethnic, and class-based health disparities in the United States. These insights because they are largely unexplored are best captured qualitatively through academic-community research partnership. We established the participatory mixed method Little Village participatory community health assessment (CHA) to explore community health in an ethnic enclave...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Community Health
Patricia Isabel Documet, Mark M Troyer, Laura Macia
OBJECTIVE: To determine the association of social support with alcohol abuse, depression, and health care access among Latino immigrant men in an emerging Latino community (an area with a small yet growing Latino population). METHODS: Cross-sectional baseline data of 140 men prior to a participatory male-to-male community health worker intervention among Latino immigrants were analyzed using logistic regression. Community health workers recruited community participants in Western Pennsylvania between 2011 and 2013...
March 1, 2018: Health Education & Behavior: the Official Publication of the Society for Public Health Education
Frank J Elgar, Natale Canale, Michael J A Wohl, Michela Lenzi, Alessio Vieno
BACKGROUND: Previous research has found that area-level income inequality and individual-level relative deprivation both contribute to disordered gambling in adults. However, the socioeconomic factors that contribute to disordered gambling in youths and protective factors in their social environment have not been fully explored. This study examined the association between relative deprivation and youth disordered gambling and the potential moderating role of social support in this association...
March 7, 2018: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Roberta Lynn Woodgate, David Shiyokha Busolo
BACKGROUND: African Immigrant and refugee youth represent an increasing group of newcomers in Canada. Upon their immigration, youth experience challenges that have the potential to lead to poor health, yet little is known about their settlement journey. Accordingly, this qualitative study examines the settlement journey of African immigrant and refugee youth with a focus on how their experiences were shaped by the social determinants of health. METHODS: We conducted a total of 70 interviews with 52 immigrant and refugee youth (ages 13-29 years) who had arrived in Canada in the preceding six years...
March 7, 2018: BMC Public Health
Omolade Femi-Ajao, Sarah Kendal, Karina Lovell
INTRODUCTION: Domestic violence and abuse has been recognised as an international public health problem. However, the pervasiveness of the problem is unknown due in part to underreporting, especially among women from ethnic minority populations. In relation to this group, this review seeks to explore: (1) the barriers to disclosure; (2) the facilitators of help-seeking; and (3) self-perceived impacts of domestic violence. DESIGN: We systematically identified published qualitative studies conducted among women from ethnic minority populations in the UK...
March 7, 2018: Ethnicity & Health
Lilit Karapetyan, Om Dawani, Heather S Laird-Fick
The immigrant population in the United States has grown over the past years. Undocumented immigrants account for 14.6% of the uninsured population in the United States. Decisions about end-of-life treatment are often difficult to reach in the best of situations. We present a 43-year-old undocumented Mexican female immigrant with metastatic sarcomatoid squamous cell cervical cancer and discuss the barriers that she faced during her treatment. Limited English proficiency, living below the poverty line, low level of education, and lack access to Medicare, Medicaid, or other insurance coverage under the Affordable Care Act are major causes of decreased health-care access and service utilization by the immigrant population...
January 1, 2018: Journal of Palliative Care
Michael S Cohen, William L Schpero
Recent research has shown that concern about the apprehension and deportation of undocumented immigrants can affect how members of their households who are eligible for public benefits choose to participate in public programs. The extent to which this "chilling effect" broadly affects adults' Medicaid enrollment nationally remains unclear, in part because of the difficulty of isolating undocumented immigrants in survey data. In this study we identified households that likely included undocumented immigrants and then examined whether gains in health care coverage due to the expansion of Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) were dampened for eligible people living in households with mixed immigration status...
March 2018: Health Affairs
Ana Filipa Madeira, Cicero Roberto Pereira, Ana Gama, Sónia Dias
OBJECTIVE: Immigrants tend to receive a lower quality of healthcare, which can be a sign of healthcare bias. We examined whether this bias in medical care is associated with a legitimizing process involving two psychosocial factors: threat perception and level of intergroup contact. METHOD: One hundred eighty six Portuguese health professionals (55.6% clinicians; 44.4% nurses; 78.5% female; Mage = 45.83, range = 23 and 71) completed a questionnaire on prejudiced attitudes toward immigrants, perceptions of health-specific threats, bias in medical practice and level of contact with immigrant patients...
March 5, 2018: Cultural Diversity & Ethnic Minority Psychology
Stephanie A Torres, Catherine DeCarlo Santiago, Katherine Kaufka Walts, Maryse H Richards
Currently, 15 million Mexican and Central American individuals live in the United States, with this number projected to rise in the next few decades (Lesser & Batalova, 2017; Zong & Batalova, 2017). Research has begun to investigate the impact of the nation's immigration practices and policies on immigrant Latino/a families and youth. Current immigration policies can create vulnerabilities, including fear and mistrust, discrimination, limited access to services, parent-child separation, and poverty...
March 5, 2018: American Psychologist
Elena Cyrus, Diana M Sheehan, Kristopher Fennie, Mariana Sanchez, Christyl T Dawson, Marsha Cameron, Lorene Maddox, Mary Jo Trepka
Prompt HIV diagnosis decreases the risk of HIV transmission and improves health outcomes. The study objective was to examine rates of delayed HIV diagnosis among non-Latino Black Caribbean immigrants in Florida. The sample included 39,008 Black HIV-positive individuals, aged 13 or older from the Caribbean and the mainland U.S. Delayed HIV diagnosis was defined as AIDS diagnosis within three months of HIV diagnosis. After adjusting for demographic factors, year of HIV diagnosis, transmission mode, neighborhood level socioeconomic status, and rural-urban residence, a disparity persisted for Caribbean-born Blacks in the Bahamas and Haiti compared with U...
2018: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Yolanda Covington-Ward, Kafuli Agbemenu, Annamore Matambanadzo
BACKGROUND: This study examines stress and stress management from the perspective of African immigrants in southwestern Pennsylvania. Our research questions explore how participants define stress, the most common causes of stress, manifestations of stress, and common strategies for stress management. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive, cross-sectional, qualitative study with 34 African immigrants. Data were collected via three focus groups. Qualitative data were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed to identify common themes...
2018: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Meira Mahmoud Yasin
It has been said that those with the least are often the ones with the most to give. This proved to be true for a Syrian refugee turned cardiologist who provides care in communities that are poor and underserved including refugees, immigrants, minorities, those of low socioeconomic status, and other vulnerable populations. Dr. Heval Kelli is the epitome of a kind-hearted, humble, genuine hero, through his dedication to serving humanity. Between providing health care to those in need, educating future generations of doctors, mentoring high school students, and advocating for the less fortunate, his life is truly his message to the world...
2018: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Raj S Bhopal, Laurence Gruer, Genevieve Cezard, Anne Douglas, Markus F C Steiner, Andrew Millard, Duncan Buchanan, S Vittal Katikireddi, Aziz Sheikh
BACKGROUND: Migrant and ethnic minority groups are often assumed to have poor health relative to the majority population. Few countries have the capacity to study a key indicator, mortality, by ethnicity and country of birth. We hypothesized at least 10% differences in mortality by ethnic group in Scotland that would not be wholly attenuated by adjustment for socio-economic factors or country of birth. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We linked the Scottish 2001 Census to mortality data (2001-2013) in 4...
March 2018: PLoS Medicine
Anthony F Jorm, Anna M Ross, Erminia Colucci
BACKGROUND: A number of Delphi expert consensus studies have been carried out with different countries and cultural groups to develop guidelines on how a member of the public should provide assistance to a person who is suicidal. The present study aimed to determine whether cross-culturally generalizable suicide first aid actions are possible by comparing agreement across these Delphi studies. METHODS: Data on endorsement rates for items were compared across six Delphi studies...
March 1, 2018: BMC Psychiatry
Richard C Cervantes, Karina A Gattamorta, Jodi Berger-Cardoso
Little is known about the specific behavioral health impact of acculturation stressors that affect Hispanic/Latino immigrant sub-groups. These immigration-related stressors and traumatic events may have differential impact on depression depending on country/region of origin. Using a measure of immigration and acculturation stress, the current study sought to determine differences in the impact of stress on six sub-groups of Hispanic immigrants. Data on stress and depression were examined using a large, representative adult immigrant sample (N = 641)...
February 27, 2018: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Adel Asaad, Kimberley Cao, Mark Rumbak
Indoor air pollution appears to be a major environmental and public health hazard for large numbers of the underdeveloped world's population. A detailed environmental history is important for making diagnosis in most individuals from foreign rural settings with nonspecific respiratory symptoms. In this report, we describe an illustrative case of domestically acquired particulate lung disease (DAPLD) or "hut lung" in a 65-year-old Sudanese male who immigrated to the United States in 1986. He presented with symptoms of chronic productive cough and dyspnea...
2018: Respiratory Medicine Case Reports
Thomas M Ludden, Yhenneko J Taylor, Laura K Simmons, Heather A Smith, Brisa Urquieta de Hernandez, Hazel Tapp, Owen J Furuseth, Michael F Dulin
Hispanic immigrant communities across the U.S. experience persistent health disparities and barriers to primary care. We examined whether community-based participatory research (CBPR) and geospatial modeling could systematically and reproducibly pinpoint neighborhoods in Charlotte, North Carolina with large proportions of Hispanic immigrants who were at-risk for poor health outcomes and health disparities. Using a CBPR framework, we identified 21 social determinants of health measures and developed a geospatial model from a subset of those measures to identify neighborhoods with large proportions of Hispanic immigrant populations at risk for poor health outcomes...
February 26, 2018: Journal of Primary Prevention
Corissa P Chang, Judith C Barker, Kristin S Hoeft, Claudia Guerra, Lisa H Chung, Nancy J Burke
PURPOSE: This study's purpose was to explore how content and format of children's oral health instruction in the dental clinic is perceived by parents and might affect parents' knowledge and behaviors. METHODS: Thirty low-income Mexican immigrant parents of children age five years and under were recruited from dental clinics in 2015 to 2016. In-person qualitative interviews in Spanish about their children's and their own experiences of dental care and home oral hygiene practices were conducted, digitally recorded, translated, and transcribed...
January 1, 2018: Pediatric Dentistry
Libertad González
I use birth-certificate data for Spain to document extremely son-biased sex ratios at birth among Indian immigrants (122 boys per 100 girls), especially at higher parities. I also show that the children of Indian immigrants display poor health outcomes during infancy. For instance, almost 10% of boys with Indian parents are born prematurely, compared with 6% of boys with native parents. However, there is no evidence of a gender gap in infant health among the children of Indian immigrants. I provide evidence suggesting that the poor outcomes of Indian children at birth may be attributed to the low endowments of Indian mothers, while the absence of a gender gap may be driven by the fact that the parents who would invest less in girls are less likely to carry the pregnancies of girls to term (more likely to practice sex-selective abortion), combined with the lower cost of prenatal investments in Spain (compared with India)...
February 15, 2018: Economics and Human Biology
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"