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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28547568/biofertilizers-and-sustainable-agriculture-exploring-arbuscular-mycorrhizal-fungi
#1
REVIEW
Nicholas O Igiehon, Olubukola O Babalola
Worldwide agricultural food production has to double in 2050 so as to feed the global increasing population while reducing dependency on conventional chemical fertilizers plus pesticides. To accomplish this objective, there is the need to explore the several mutualistic interactions between plant roots and rhizosphere microbiome. Biofertilization is the process of boosting the abundance of microorganisms such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in the natural plant rhizosphere which depicts a beneficial alternative to chemical fertilization practices...
May 25, 2017: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28535261/recruitment-of-a-lineage-specific-virulence-regulatory-pathway-promotes-intracellular-infection-by-a-plant-pathogen-experimentally-evolved-into-a-legume-symbiont
#2
Delphine Capela, Marta Marchetti, Camille Clérissi, Anthony Perrier, Dorian Guetta, Carine Gris, Marc Valls, Alain Jauneau, Stéphane Cruveiller, Eduardo P C Rocha, Catherine Masson-Boivin
Ecological transitions between different lifestyles, such as pathogenicity, mutualism and saprophytism, have been very frequent in the course of microbial evolution, and often driven by horizontal gene transfer. Yet, how genomes achieve the ecological transition initiated by the transfer of complex biological traits remains poorly known. Here we used experimental evolution, genomics, transcriptomics and high-resolution phenotyping to analyze the evolution of the plant pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum into legume symbionts, following the transfer of a natural plasmid encoding the essential mutualistic genes...
May 23, 2017: Molecular Biology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533969/ranking-of-critical-species-to-preserve-the-functionality-of-mutualistic-networks-using-the-k-core-decomposition
#3
Javier García-Algarra, Juan Manuel Pastor, José María Iriondo, Javier Galeano
BACKGROUND: Network analysis has become a relevant approach to analyze cascading species extinctions resulting from perturbations on mutualistic interactions as a result of environmental change. In this context, it is essential to be able to point out key species, whose stability would prevent cascading extinctions, and the consequent loss of ecosystem function. In this study, we aim to explain how the k-core decomposition sheds light on the understanding the robustness of bipartite mutualistic networks...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28523126/transforming-growth-factor-%C3%AE-a-master-regulator-of-the-gut-microbiota-and-immune-cell-interactions
#4
REVIEW
David Bauché, Julien C Marie
The relationship between host organisms and their microbiota has co-evolved towards an inter-dependent network of mutualistic interactions. This interplay is particularly well studied in the gastrointestinal tract, where microbiota and host immune cells can modulate each other directly, as well as indirectly, through the production and release of chemical molecules and signals. In this review, we define the functional impact of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) on this complex interplay, especially through its modulation of the activity of local regulatory T cells (Tregs), type 17 helper (Th17) cells, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) and B cells...
April 2017: Clinical & Translational Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28490622/mutualistic-strategies-minimize-coextinction-in-plant-disperser-networks
#5
Evan C Fricke, Joshua J Tewksbury, Elizabeth M Wandrag, Haldre S Rogers
The global decline of mutualists such as pollinators and seed dispersers may cause negative direct and indirect impacts on biodiversity. Mutualistic network models used to understand the stability of mutualistic systems indicate that species with low partner diversity are most vulnerable to coextinction following mutualism disruption. However, existing models have not considered how species vary in their dependence on mutualistic interactions for reproduction or survival, overlooking the potential influence of this variation on species' coextinction vulnerability and on network stability...
May 17, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28469020/trophic-level-successional-age-and-trait-matching-determine-specialization-of-deadwood-based-interaction-networks-of-saproxylic-beetles
#6
Beate Wende, Martin M Gossner, Ingo Grass, Tobias Arnstadt, Martin Hofrichter, Andreas Floren, Karl Eduard Linsenmair, Wolfgang W Weisser, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter
The specialization of ecological networks provides important insights into possible consequences of biodiversity loss for ecosystem functioning. However, mostly mutualistic and antagonistic interactions of living organisms have been studied, whereas detritivore networks and their successional changes are largely unexplored. We studied the interactions of saproxylic (deadwood-dependent) beetles with their dead host trees. In a large-scale experiment, 764 logs of 13 tree species were exposed to analyse network structure of three trophic groups of saproxylic beetles over 3 successional years...
May 17, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28444516/trap-nesting-hymenoptera-and-their-network-with-parasites-in-recovered-riparian-forests-brazil
#7
G J Araujo, R Fagundes, Y Antonini
Different aspects of human activities can cause environmental change that endanger species persistence, alter species distributions, and lead to changes in antagonistic and mutualistic interactions, whereas deforestation and flooding of riparian forest results in landscapes consisting of patchily distributed riparian forest fragments in a matrix of pastures, plantations, and urban areas. Therefore, we assessed the richness, abundance, and trophic interactions of trap-nesting Hymenoptera and their parasites at four patches of restored riparian forest and at one reference natural fragment, of different sizes and ages, located at the Volta Grande Reservoir, in Minas Gerais and São Paulo states to answer the following questions: (1) Does the richness and abundance of cavity-nesting bees and wasps differ in riparian forest fragments according to the seasonal periods? (2) Does the composition of cavity-nesting bees and wasps vary among restoration and reference sites and between climate seasons (wet and dry)? (3) How do the degrees of specialization of the parasites vary among the patches of forest? We recorded 12 species of wasps, eight of bees, and nine species of parasites...
April 25, 2017: Neotropical Entomology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28431213/genome-mining-unearths-a-hybrid-nonribosomal-peptide-synthetase-like-pteridine-synthase-biosynthetic-gene-cluster
#8
Hyun Bong Park, Corey E Perez, Karl W Barber, Jesse Rinehart, Jason M Crawford
Nonribosomal peptides represent a large class of metabolites with pharmaceutical relevance. Pteridines, such as pterins, folates, and flavins, are heterocyclic metabolites that often serve as redox-active cofactors. The biosynthetic machineries for construction of these distinct classes of small molecules operate independently in the cell. Here, we discovered an unprecedented nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like-pteridine synthase hybrid biosynthetic gene cluster in Photorhabdus luminescens using genome synteny analysis...
March 15, 2017: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28415137/drivers-of-species-role-in-avian-seed-dispersal-mutualistic-networks
#9
Esther Sebastián-González
The mutualistic interaction between frugivore birds and the fruiting plants they disperse presents an asymmetric interaction pattern, with some species having a more important role (i.e. being essential) for maintaining the structure and functioning of the interaction network. The identification of the biological characteristics of these species is of major importance for the understanding and conservation of seed-dispersal interactions. In this study, I use a network approach and avian seed-dispersal networks from 23 different geographical areas to test five hypotheses about species characteristics determining the structure of the assemblage...
April 17, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28410570/natural-selection-drove-metabolic-specialization-of-the-chromatophore-in-paulinella-chromatophora
#10
Cecilio Valadez-Cano, Roberto Olivares-Hernández, Osbaldo Resendis-Antonio, Alexander DeLuna, Luis Delaye
BACKGROUND: Genome degradation of host-restricted mutualistic endosymbionts has been attributed to inactivating mutations and genetic drift while genes coding for host-relevant functions are conserved by purifying selection. Unlike their free-living relatives, the metabolism of mutualistic endosymbionts and endosymbiont-originated organelles is specialized in the production of metabolites which are released to the host. This specialization suggests that natural selection crafted these metabolic adaptations...
April 14, 2017: BMC Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28402583/the-potential-indirect-effects-among-plants-via-shared-hummingbird-pollinators-are-structured-by-phenotypic-similarity
#11
Pedro Joaquim Bergamo, Marina Wolowski, Pietro Kiyoshi Maruyama, Jeferson Vizentin-Bugoni, Luísa G Carvalheiro, Marlies Sazima
Plant species within communities may overlap in pollinators' use and influence visitation patterns of shared pollinators, potentially engaging in indirect interactions (e.g. facilitation or competition). While several studies have explored the mechanisms regulating insect-pollination networks, there is a lack of studies on bird-pollination systems, particularly in species-rich tropical areas. Here, we evaluated if phenotypic similarity, resource availability (floral abundance), evolutionary relatedness and flowering phenology affect the potential for indirect effects via shared pollinators in hummingbird-pollinated plant species within four communities in the Brazilian Atlantic forest...
April 12, 2017: Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28358026/molecular-characterization-reveals-the-complexity-of-previously-overlooked-coral-exosymbiont-interactions-and-the-implications-for-coral-guild-ecology
#12
H Rouzé, M Leray, H Magalon, L Penin, P Gélin, N Knowlton, C Fauvelot
Several obligate associate crabs and shrimps species may co-occur and interact within a single coral host, leading to patterns of associations that can provide essential ecological services. However, knowledge of the dynamics of interactions in this system is limited, partly because identifying species involved in the network remains challenging. In this study, we assessed the diversity of the decapods involved in exosymbiotic assemblages for juvenile and adult Pocillopora damicornis types α and β on reefs of New Caledonia and Reunion Island...
March 30, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28298349/network-reorganization-and-breakdown-of-an-ant-plant-protection-mutualism-with-elevation
#13
Nichola S Plowman, Amelia S C Hood, Jimmy Moses, Conor Redmond, Vojtech Novotny, Petr Klimes, Tom M Fayle
Both the abiotic environment and the composition of animal and plant communities change with elevation. For mutualistic species, these changes are expected to result in altered partner availability, and shifts in context-dependent benefits for partners. To test these predictions, we assessed the network structure of terrestrial ant-plant mutualists and how the benefits to plants of ant inhabitation changed with elevation in tropical forest in Papua New Guinea. At higher elevations, ant-plants were rarer, species richness of both ants and plants decreased, and the average ant or plant species interacted with fewer partners...
March 15, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28297860/evolution-of-correlated-multiplexity-through-stability-maximization
#14
Sanjiv K Dwivedi, Sarika Jalan
Investigating the relation between various structural patterns found in real-world networks and the stability of underlying systems is crucial to understand the importance and evolutionary origin of such patterns. We evolve multiplex networks, comprising antisymmetric couplings in one layer depicting predator-prey relationship and symmetric couplings in the other depicting mutualistic (or competitive) relationship, based on stability maximization through the largest eigenvalue of the corresponding adjacency matrices...
February 2017: Physical Review. E
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28244516/construction-and-simulation-of-the-bradyrhizobium-diazoefficiens-usda110-metabolic-network-a-comparison-between-free-living-and-symbiotic-states
#15
Yi Yang, Xiao-Pan Hu, Bin-Guang Ma
Bradyrhizobium diazoefficiens is a rhizobium able to convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonium by establishing mutualistic symbiosis with soybean. It has been recognized as an important parent strain for microbial agents and is widely applied in agricultural and environmental fields. In order to study the metabolic properties of symbiotic nitrogen fixation and the differences between a free-living cell and a symbiotic bacteroid, a genome-scale metabolic network of B. diazoefficiens USDA110 was constructed and analyzed...
February 28, 2017: Molecular BioSystems
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28135774/functional-consequences-of-plant-animal-interactions-along-the-mutualism-antagonism-gradient
#16
María C Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Pedro Jordano, Alfredo Valido
Plant-animal interactions are pivotal for ecosystem functioning, and usually form complex networks involving multiple species of mutualists as well as antagonists. The costs and benefits of these interactions show a strong context-dependency directly related to individual variation in partner identity and differential strength. Yet understanding the context-dependency and functional consequences of mutualistic and antagonistic interactions on individuals remains a lasting challenge. We use a network approach to characterize the individual, plant-based pollination interaction networks of the Canarian Isoplexis canariensis (Plantaginaceae) with a mixed assemblage of vertebrate mutualists (birds and lizards) and invertebrate antagonists (florivores, nectar larcenists, and predispersal seed predators)...
January 30, 2017: Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28134358/emergence-of-consensus-as-a-modular-to-nested-transition-in-communication-dynamics
#17
Javier Borge-Holthoefer, Raquel A Baños, Carlos Gracia-Lázaro, Yamir Moreno
Online social networks have transformed the way in which humans communicate and interact, leading to a new information ecosystem where people send and receive information through multiple channels, including traditional communication media. Despite many attempts to characterize the structure and dynamics of these techno-social systems, little is known about fundamental aspects such as how collective attention arises and what determines the information life-cycle. Current approaches to these problems either focus on human temporal dynamics or on semiotic dynamics...
January 30, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28103287/does-a-species-extinction-proneness-predict-its-contribution-to-nestedness-a-test-using-a-sunbird-tree-visitation-network
#18
Charles A Nsor, Hazel M Chapman, William Godsoe
Animal pollinators and the plants they pollinate depend on networks of mutualistic partnerships and more broadly on the stability of such networks. Based mainly on insect-plant visitation networks, theory predicts that species that are most prone to extinction contribute the most to nestedness, however empirical tests are rare. We used a sunbird-tree visitation network within which were both extinction prone vs non extinction prone sunbird species to test the idea. We predicted that the extinction prone species would contribute the most to nestedness...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28053063/correction-to-unravelling-darwin-s-entangled-bank-architecture-and-robustness-of-mutualistic-networks-with-multiple-interaction-types
#19
Wesley Dáttilo, Nubia Lara-Rodríguez, Pedro Jordano, Paulo R Guimarães, John N Thompson, Robert J Marquis, Lucas P Medeiros, Raul Ortiz-Pulido, Maria A Marcos-García, Victor Rico-Gray
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28039116/loss-of-functional-diversity-and-network-modularity-in-introduced-plant-fungal-symbioses
#20
Ian A Dickie, Jerry A Cooper, Jennifer L Bufford, Philip E Hulme, Scott T Bates
The introduction of alien plants into a new range can result in the loss of co-evolved symbiotic organisms, such as mycorrhizal fungi, that are essential for normal plant physiological functions. Prior studies of mycorrhizal associations in alien plants have tended to focus on individual plant species on a case-by-case basis. This approach limits broad scale understanding of functional shifts and changes in interaction network structure that may occur following introduction. Here we use two extensive datasets of plant-fungal interactions derived from fungal sporocarp observations and recorded plant hosts in two island archipelago nations: New Zealand (NZ) and the United Kingdom (UK)...
December 30, 2016: AoB Plants
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