keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Spinal plasticity

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913797/promoting-gait-recovery-and-limiting-neuropathic-pain-after-spinal-cord-injury-two-sides-of-the-same-coin
#1
Catherine Mercier, Meyke Roosink, Jason Bouffard, Laurent J Bouyer
Most persons living with a spinal cord injury experience neuropathic pain in the months following their lesion, at the moment where they receive intensive gait rehabilitation. Based on studies using animal models, it has been proposed that central sensitization in nociceptive pathways (maladaptive plasticity) and plasticity related to motor learning (adaptive plasticity) share common neural mechanisms and compete with each other. This article aims to address the discrepancy between the growing body of basic science literature supporting this hypothesis and the general belief in rehabilitation research that pain and gait rehabilitation represent two independent problems...
December 2, 2016: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911749/casting-a-wide-net-role-of-perineuronal-nets-in-neural-plasticity
#2
Barbara A Sorg, Sabina Berretta, Jordan M Blacktop, James W Fawcett, Hiroshi Kitagawa, Jessica C F Kwok, Marta Miquel
Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are unique extracellular matrix structures that wrap around certain neurons in the CNS during development and control plasticity in the adult CNS. They appear to contribute to a wide range of diseases/disorders of the brain, are involved in recovery from spinal cord injury, and are altered during aging, learning and memory, and after exposure to drugs of abuse. Here the focus is on how a major component of PNNs, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, control plasticity, and on the role of PNNs in memory in normal aging, in a tauopathy model of Alzheimer's disease, and in drug addiction...
November 9, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27911744/dysregulation-of-mrna-localization-and-translation-in-genetic-disease
#3
Eric T Wang, J Matthew Taliaferro, Ji-Ann Lee, Indulekha P Sudhakaran, Wilfried Rossoll, Christina Gross, Kathryn R Moss, Gary J Bassell
RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) acting at various steps in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression play crucial roles in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. Genetic mutations affecting several RBPs and associated factors lead to diverse neurological symptoms, as characterized by neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, neuromuscular and neurodegenerative diseases, and can often be multisystemic diseases. We will highlight the physiological roles of a few specific proteins in molecular mechanisms of cytoplasmic mRNA regulation, and how these processes are dysregulated in genetic disease...
November 9, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893610/slit2-robo1-promotes-synaptogenesis-and-functional-recovery-of-spinal-cord-injury
#4
Yang Li, Yan Gao, Xueqin Xu, Ruoshi Shi, Juying Liu, Wanjun Yao, Changbin Ke
Neuronal network reconstruction is a pivotal determinant for functional recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI), the process of which includes synaptogenesis. Slit2 protein has been identified as a key regulator of axon regeneration and synapse formation in the vertebrate. Meanwhile, RhoA is the converging cascade of inhibitory molecules that interrupt synaptic plasticity in SCI. In the present study, we investigated the interaction among Slit2, Robo1, and RhoA and the potential roles of Slit2 in the pathological process of SCI...
November 23, 2016: Neuroreport
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27890831/neural-plasticity-during-motor-learning-with-motor-imagery-practice-review-and-perspectives
#5
REVIEW
Célia Ruffino, Charalambos Papaxanthis, Florent Lebon
In the last decade, many studies confirmed the benefits of mental practice with motor imagery. In this review we first aimed to compile data issued from fundamental and clinical investigations and to provide the key-components for the optimization of motor imagery strategy. We focused on transcranial magnetic stimulation studies, supported by brain imaging research, that sustain the current hypothesis of a functional link between cortical reorganization and behavioral improvement. As perspectives, we suggest a model of neural adaptation following mental practice, in which synapse conductivity and inhibitory mechanisms at the spinal level may also play an important role...
November 25, 2016: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27884958/activity-dependent-redistribution-of-kv2-1-ion-channels-on-rat-spinal-motoneurons
#6
Shannon H Romer, Adam S Deardorff, Robert E W Fyffe
Homeostatic plasticity occurs through diverse cellular and synaptic mechanisms, and extensive investigations over the preceding decade have established Kv2.1 ion channels as key homeostatic regulatory elements in several central neuronal systems. As in these cellular systems, Kv2.1 channels in spinal motoneurons (MNs) localize within large somatic membrane clusters. However, their role in regulating motoneuron activity is not fully established in vivo. We have previously demonstrated marked Kv2.1 channel redistribution in MNs following in vitro glutamate application and in vivo peripheral nerve injury (Romer et al...
November 2016: Physiological Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27882348/humanized-neuronal-chimeric-mouse-brain-generated-by-neonatally-engrafted-human-ipsc-derived-primitive-neural-progenitor-cells
#7
Chen Chen, Woo-Yang Kim, Peng Jiang
The creation of a humanized chimeric mouse nervous system permits the study of human neural development and disease pathogenesis using human cells in vivo. Humanized glial chimeric mice with the brain and spinal cord being colonized by human glial cells have been successfully generated. However, generation of humanized chimeric mouse brains repopulated by human neurons to possess a high degree of chimerism have not been well studied. Here we created humanized neuronal chimeric mouse brains by neonatally engrafting the distinct and highly neurogenic human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived rosette-type primitive neural progenitors...
November 17, 2016: JCI Insight
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27881040/a-single-dose-of-docosahexaenoic-acid-increases-the-functional-recovery-promoted-by-rehabilitation-following-cervical-spinal-cord-injury-in-the-rat
#8
Zhuo-Hao Liu, Ping Yip, John V Priestley, Adina T Michael-Titus
Task-specific rehabilitation has been shown to promote functional recovery after acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, the omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), has been shown to promote neuroplasticity after SCI. Here, we investigated whether the combination of a single bolus of DHA with rehabilitation can enhance the effect of DHA or rehabilitation therapy in adult injured spinal cord. We found enhanced functional improvement with DHA in combination with rehabilitation compared to either treatment alone in a rat cervical lateral hemisection SCI model...
November 23, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875927/what-is-being-trained-how-divergent-forms-of-plasticity-compete-to-shape-locomotor-recovery-after-spinal-cord-injury
#9
J Russell Huie, Kazuhito Morioka, Jenny Haefeli, Adam R Ferguson
Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating syndrome that produces dysfunction in motor and sensory systems, manifesting as chronic paralysis, sensory changes, and pain disorders. The multifaceted and heterogeneous nature of SCI has made effective rehabilitative strategies challenging. Work over the last 40 years has aimed to overcome these obstacles by harnessing the intrinsic plasticity of the spinal cord to improve functional locomotor recovery. Intensive training after SCI facilitates lower extremity function and has shown promise as a tool for retraining the spinal cord by engaging innate locomotor circuitry in the lumbar cord...
November 22, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27869313/the-role-of-the-mir-17-92-cluster-in-neurogenesis-and-angiogenesis-in-the-central-nervous-system-of-adults
#10
REVIEW
Ping Yang, Linghu Cai, Guan Zhang, Zhiqun Bian, Gaofeng Han
It is well known that neurogenesis is not the only concern for the fully functional recovery after brain or spinal cord injury, as it has been shed light on the critical role of angiogenesis in improving neurological functional recovery. Angiogenesis and neurogenesis coordinately interact with each other in the developing and adult brain, during which they may respond to similar mediators and receptors, in which they share a common posttranscriptional regulator: the miR-17-92 cluster. The miR-17-92 cluster was initially described as an oncogene and was later demonstrated to drive key physiological and pathological responses during development and diseases respectively...
November 21, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27859933/spectroscopic-biomarkers-of-motor-cortex-developmental-plasticity-in-hemiparetic-children-after-perinatal-stroke
#11
Helen L Carlson, Frank P MacMaster, Ashley D Harris, Adam Kirton
Perinatal stroke causes hemiparetic cerebral palsy and lifelong motor disability. Bilateral motor cortices are key hubs within the motor network and their neurophysiology determines clinical function. Establishing biomarkers of motor cortex function is imperative for developing and evaluating restorative interventional strategies. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) quantifies metabolite concentrations indicative of underlying neuronal health and metabolism in vivo. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided MRS to investigate motor cortex metabolism in children with perinatal stroke...
November 17, 2016: Human Brain Mapping
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27857743/beyond-peripheral-nerve-injury-spinal-gliopathy-and-maladaptive-synaptic-plasticity
#12
Giovanni Cirillo, Michele Papa
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Neural Regeneration Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27856287/the-inhibition-of-spinal-synaptic-plasticity-mediated-by-activation-of-amp-activated-protein-kinase-signaling-alleviates-the-acute-pain-induced-by-oxaliplatin
#13
Yun-Zhi Ling, Zhen-Yu Li, Han-Dong Ou-Yang, Chao Ma, Shao-Ling Wu, Jia-You Wei, Huan-Huan Ding, Xiao-Long Zhang, Meng Liu, Cui-Cui Liu, Zhen-Zhen Huang, Wen-Jun Xin
Our recent findings demonstrated that oxaliplatin entering CNS may directly induce spinal central sensitization, and contribute to the rapid development of CNS-related side effects including acute pain during chemotherapy. However, the mechanism is largely unclear. In the current study, we found that the amplitude of C-fiber-evoked field potentials was significantly increased and the expression of phosphorylated mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase α (AMPKα) was markedly decreased following high frequency stimulation (HFS) or single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin (4mg/kg)...
November 14, 2016: Experimental Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852964/spinal-astrocytic-activation-contributes-to-mechanical-allodynia-in-a-rat-model-of-cyclophosphamide-induced-cystitis
#14
Bolong Liu, Minzhi Su, ShaoJun Tang, Xiangfu Zhou, Hailun Zhan, Fei Yang, Wenbiao Li, Tengcheng Li, Juncong Xie
BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that glial cells play an important role in the generation and maintenance of neuropathic pain. Activated glial cells produce numerous mediators such as proinflammatory cytokines that facilitate neuronal activity and synaptic plasticity. Similarly, bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis shares many characteristics of neuropathic pain. However, related report on the involvement of spinal glia in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis-associated pathological pain and the underlying mechanisms are still lacking...
2016: Molecular Pain
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852772/functional-synaptic-integration-of-forebrain-gabaergic-precursors-into-the-adult-spinal-cord
#15
Alex Etlin, Joao M Bráz, Julia A Kuhn, Xidao Wang, Katherine A Hamel, Ida J Llewellyn-Smith, Allan I Basbaum
: Spinal cord transplants of embryonic cortical GABAergic progenitor cells derived from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) can reverse mechanical hypersensitivity in the mouse models of peripheral nerve injury- and paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain. Here, we used electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy to examine the extent to which MGE cells integrate into host circuitry and recapitulate endogenous inhibitory circuits. Whether the transplants were performed before or after nerve injury, the MGE cells developed into mature neurons and exhibited firing patterns characteristic of subpopulations of cortical and spinal cord inhibitory interneurons...
November 16, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27847705/a-model-of-glial-scarring-analogous-to-the-environment-of-a-traumatically-injured-spinal-cord-using-kainate
#16
Jong Yoon Yoo, Chang Ho Hwang, Hea Nam Hong
OBJECTIVE: To develop an in vitro model analogous to the environment of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), the authors evaluated change of astrogliosis following treatments with kainate and/or scratch, and degree of neurite outgrowth after treatment with a kainate inhibitor. METHODS: Astrocytes were obtained from the rat spinal cord. Then, 99% of the cells were confirmed to be GFAP-positive astrocytes. For chemical injury, the cells were treated with kainate at different concentrations (10, 50 or 100 µM)...
October 2016: Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27834670/resistance-training-with-instability-is-more-effective-than-resistance-training-in-improving-spinal-inhibitory-mechanisms-in-parkinson-s-disease
#17
Carla Silva-Batista, Eugenia Casella Tavares Mattos, Daniel M Corcos, Jessica M Wilson, Charles J Heckman, Helcio Kanegusuku, Maria Elisa Pimentel Piemonte, Marco Túlio de Mello, Claudia Lucia de Moraes Forjaz, Hamilton Roschel, Valmor Alberto Tricoli, Carlos Ugrinowitsch
BACKGROUND: This study assessed: 1) the effects of 12 weeks of resistance training (RT) and resistance training with instability (RTI) on presynaptic inhibition (PSI) and disynaptic reciprocal inhibition (DRI) of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD); 2) the effectiveness of RT and RTI in moving PSI and DRI values of patients towards values of age-matched healthy controls (HC [Z-score analysis]); and 3) associations between PSI and DRI changes and clinical outcomes changes previously published...
November 10, 2016: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27818188/complete-spinal-cord-injury-sci-transforms-how-brain-derived-neurotrophic-factor-bdnf-affects-nociceptive-sensitization
#18
Yung-Jen Huang, Kuan H Lee, James W Grau
Noxious stimulation can induce a lasting increase in neural excitability within the spinal cord (central sensitization) that can promote pain and disrupt adaptive function (maladaptive plasticity). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to regulate the development of plasticity and has been shown to impact the development of spinally-mediated central sensitization. The latter effect has been linked to an alteration in GABA-dependent inhibition. Prior studies have shown that, in spinally transected rats, exposure to regular (fixed spaced) stimulation can counter the development of maladaptive plasticity and have linked this effect to an up-regulation of BDNF...
November 3, 2016: Experimental Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27800545/loss-of-syndig1-reduces-excitatory-synapse-maturation-but-not-formation-in-vivo
#19
George Chenaux, Lucas Matt, Travis C Hill, Inderpreet Kaur, Xiao-Bo Liu, Lyndsey M Kirk, David J Speca, Samuel A McMahon, Karen Zito, Johannes W Hell, Elva Díaz
Modification of the strength of excitatory synaptic connections is a fundamental mechanism by which neural circuits are refined during development and learning. Synapse Differentiation Induced Gene 1 (SynDIG1) has been shown to play a key role in regulating synaptic strength in vitro. Here, we investigated the role of SynDIG1 in vivo in mice with a disruption of the SynDIG1 gene rather than use an alternate loxP-flanked conditional mutant that we find retains a partial protein product. The gene-trap insertion with a reporter cassette mutant mice shows that the SynDIG1 promoter is active during embryogenesis in the retina with some activity in the brain, and postnatally in the mouse hippocampus, cortex, hindbrain, and spinal cord...
September 2016: ENeuro
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27800189/paired-stimulation-to-promote-lasting-augmentation-of-corticospinal-circuits
#20
REVIEW
Noam Y Harel, Jason B Carmel
After injury, electrical stimulation of the nervous system can augment plasticity of spared or latent circuits through focal modulation. Pairing stimulation of two parts of a spared circuit can target modulation more specifically to the intended circuit. We discuss 3 kinds of paired stimulation in the context of the corticospinal system, because of its importance in clinical neurorehabilitation. The first uses principles of Hebbian plasticity: by altering the stimulation timing of presynaptic neurons and their postsynaptic targets, synapse function can be modulated up or down...
2016: Neural Plasticity
keyword
keyword
9246
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"