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"Accelerometer " "diabetes"

Jennifer L Reed, Stephanie A Prince, Andrew L Pipe, Suzanne Attallah, Kristi B Adamo, Heather E Tulloch, Douglas Manuel, Kerri-Anne Mullen, J George Fodor, Robert D Reid
BACKGROUND: Nurses are the largest professional group within the health care workforce, and their work is perceived as being physically demanding. Regular physical activity helps to prevent or ameliorate cardiometabolic conditions (e.g. cardiovascular disease, diabetes). It is not known whether Canadian nurses are meeting current physical activity guidelines. OBJECTIVE: To assess the influence of the workplace on the physical activity and cardiometabolic health of nurses from hospitals in the Champlain region of Ontario, Canada...
February 13, 2018: International Journal of Nursing Studies
Andreas Triantafyllidis, Dimitris Filos, Jomme Claes, Roselien Buys, Véronique Cornelissen, Evangelia Kouidi, Ioanna Chouvarda, Nicos Maglaveras
BACKGROUND: The benefits of regular physical activity for health and quality of life are unarguable. New information, sensing and communication technologies have the potential to play a critical role in computerised decision support and coaching for physical activity. OBJECTIVES: We provide a literature review of recent research in the development of physical activity interventions employing computerised decision support, their feasibility and effectiveness in healthy and diseased individuals, and map out challenges and future research directions...
March 2018: International Journal of Medical Informatics
K T Hallam, S Bilsborough, M de Courten
BACKGROUND: An increased awareness of the health benefits of walking has emerged with the development and refinement of accelerometer equipment. Evidence is beginning to highlight the value of promoting walking, particularly focusing on the Japanese mark of obtaining 10,000 steps per day. Workplace based step challenges have become popular to engage large cohorts in increasing their daily physical activity in a sustainable and enjoyable way. Findings are now highlighting the positive health effects of these medium-term programs (typically conducted over a few months) in terms of cardiovascular health, reducing diabetes risk and improving lifestyle factors such as weight and blood pressure...
January 24, 2018: BMC Psychiatry
Alex V Rowlands, Charlotte L Edwardson, Melanie J Davies, Kamlesh Khunti, Deirdre M Harrington, Tom Yates
PURPOSE: Commonly used physical activity metrics tell us little about the intensity distribution across the activity profile. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a metric, the intensity gradient, which can be used in combination with average acceleration (overall activity level) to fully describe the activity profile. METHODS: 1669 adolescent girls (sample 1) and 295 adults with type 2 diabetes (sample 2) wore a GENEActiv accelerometer on their non-dominant wrist for up to 7-days...
January 23, 2018: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Karen Borschmann, Sandra Iuliano, Ali Ghasem-Zadeh, Leonid Churilov, Marco Y C Pang, Julie Bernhardt
PURPOSE: Bone fragility contributes to increased fracture risk, but little is known about the emergence of post-stroke bone loss. We investigated skeletal changes and relationships with physical activity, stroke severity, motor control and lean mass within 6 months of stroke. METHODS: This is a prospective observational study. Participants were non-diabetic but unable to walk within 2 weeks of first stroke. Distal tibial volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD, primary outcome), bone geometry and microstructure (high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography) were assessed at baseline and 6 months, as were secondary outcomes total body bone mineral content and lean mass (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry), bone metabolism (serum osteocalcin, N-terminal propeptide of type 1 procollagen (P1NP), C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTX)), physical activity (PAL2 accelerometer) and motor control (Chedoke McMaster) which were also measured at 1 and 3 months...
January 8, 2018: Archives of Osteoporosis
Carrie B Tully, Miriam Toaff, Linda Herbert, Loretta DiPietro, Celia Henderson, Fran Cogen, Randi Streisand
Physical activity is important but may be difficult to evaluate in young children (YC) with Type 1 diabetes (T1D) because of parents' fears of hypoglycemia, difficulties engaging YC in physical activity, and use of assessment devices. This study aimed to explore the acceptability and feasibility of an in-lab exercise session for YC with T1D. Ten YC ages 3 through7 years with T1D participated in a 20-minute exercise session while wearing blinded continuous glucose monitors and accelerometers. High acceptability was found for participation in the exercise session; high feasibility and acceptability were reported for the assessments...
December 29, 2017: Journal of Pediatric Health Care
Shahrzad Bazargan-Hejazi, Jeffrey S Arroyo, Stanley Hsia, Neda Rouhi Brojeni, Deyu Pan
Objective: To investigate: 1) the racial/ethnic disparities in meeting the recommended physical activity as measured by subjective vs objective measures in a national sample of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus; and 2) the racial/ethnic differences with respect to the magnitude of the discrepancy between self-reported and objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity (MVPA). Methods: We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-06 to calculate and compare the percentage of individuals with diabetes who achieved the recommended levels of physical activity as measured by subjective self-report (500 metabolic equivalents (MET)-minutes/week) and objective accelerometer measurement (150 minutes per week of MVPA) across racial/ethnic groups...
2017: Ethnicity & Disease
Yvonne M Golightly, Kelli D Allen, Kirsten R Ambrose, Jamie L Stiller, Kelly R Evenson, Christiane Voisin, Jennifer M Hootman, Leigh F Callahan
INTRODUCTION: Physical activity (PA) is strongly endorsed for managing chronic conditions, and a vital sign tool (indicator of general physical condition) could alert providers of inadequate PA to prompt counseling or referral. This systematic review examined the use, definitions, psychometric properties, and outcomes of brief PA instruments as vital sign measures, with attention primarily to studies focused on arthritis. METHODS: Electronic databases were searched for English-language literature from 1985 through 2016 using the terms PA, exercise, vital sign, exercise referral scheme, and exercise counseling...
November 30, 2017: Preventing Chronic Disease
Samuel G Wittekind, Nicholas M Edwards, Philip R Khoury, Connie E McCoy, Lawrence M Dolan, Thomas R Kimball, Elaine M Urbina
BACKGROUND: We aimed to (1) compare a subjective and objective measure of habitual physical activity (PA), (2) determine the association of PA and cardiovascular risk factors, and (3) test the hypothesis that PA is an independent determinant of target organ damage in youth. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis of youth with and without type 2 diabetes [mean age = 22 (3.9) y]. PA was measured with International Physical Activity Questionnaire and Actical accelerometer...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Physical Activity & Health
Antti M Kiviniemi, Nelli Perkiömäki, Juha Auvinen, Maisa Niemelä, Tuija Tammelin, Katri Puukka, Aimo Ruokonen, Sirkka Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Mikko P Tulppo, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Timo Jämsä, Heikki V Huikuri, Raija Korpelainen
PURPOSE: Although low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), physical inactivity, and obesity are associated with impaired autonomic function, they are also extensively interrelated. The present study aimed to assess the extent to which they contribute to autonomic function independently of each other. METHODS: At the age of 46 yr, 1383 men and 1761 women without cardiorespiratory diseases and diabetes underwent assessments of vagally mediated heart rate (HR) variability (root mean square of successive differences in R-R interval (rMMSD)), peak HR during a submaximal step test (CRF), and 60-s HR recovery (HRR)...
December 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Nonsikelelo Mathe, Terry Boyle, Fatima Al Sayah, Clark Mundt, Jeff K Vallance, Jeffrey A Johnson, Steven T Johnson
OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to describe the volume and patterns of objectively assessed sedentary behaviour, light intensity physical activity (LPA) and moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and to examine socio-demographic correlates, among adults living with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Participants (n = 166) wore an accelerometer (Actigraph® GT3X+) for seven consecutive days during waking hours and completed a questionnaire. Physical activity (PA) and sedentary time were described, and multivariable linear regression was used to estimate associations between socio-demographic characteristics and sedentary time and PA...
November 9, 2017: Canadian Journal of Public Health. Revue Canadienne de Santé Publique
Kin-Kit Li, Lorna Ng, Sheung-Tak Cheng, Helene H Fung
It has been suggested that gain-framed messages are more effective than loss-framed messages in promoting low-risk health behaviors such as physical activity. Because of a heightened health concern and possible medical complications, older adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D) may consider physical activity to be risky. This study examined whether a reverse message-framing effect would be found among older adults with T2D. The participants included 211 sedentary and older adults with T2D recruited from an outpatient clinic...
June 1, 2017: Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology
Alexandra B Cooke, Stella S Daskalopoulou, Kaberi Dasgupta
OBJECTIVES: Accelerometer placement at the wrist is convenient and increasingly adopted despite less accurate physical activity (PA) measurement than with waist placement. Capitalizing on a study that started with wrist placement and shifted to waist placement, we compared associations between PA measures derived from different accelerometer locations with a responsive arterial health indicator, carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). DESIGN: Cross-sectional study...
August 24, 2017: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Hideki Nojima, Masayasu Yoneda, Hiroshi Watanabe, Kiminori Yamane, Yoshihiro Kitahara, Kiyokazu Sekikawa, Hideya Yamamoto, Akihito Yokoyama, Noboru Hattori, Nobuoki Kohno
BACKGROUND: We investigated the influence of aerobic capacity on the improvement in glycemic control achieved by long-term aerobic exercise in type 2 diabetes. METHODS: Fifty-three male patients with type 2 diabetes, recruited from outpatient clinics, wore multiple-memory accelerometers and were instructed to exercise at moderate intensity for ≥30 min on ≥3 days per week over 12 months. Peak oxygen uptake (peak [Formula: see text]) and serum glycated albumin (GA) were measured at baseline and after 3, 6, 12 months...
2017: Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
Stefano Balducci, Valeria D'Errico, Jonida Haxhi, Massimo Sacchetti, Giorgio Orlando, Patrizia Cardelli, Martina Vitale, Lucilla Bollanti, Francesco Conti, Silvano Zanuso, Antonio Nicolucci, Giuseppe Pugliese
OBJECTIVE: Adherence to physical activity (PA) recommendations is hampered by the lack of effective strategies to promote behavior change. The Italian Diabetes and Exercise Study 2 (IDES_2) is a randomized controlled trial evaluating a novel behavioral intervention strategy for increasing PA and decreasing sedentary time (SED-time) in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The study randomized 300 physically inactive and sedentary patients with type 2 diabetes 1:1 to receive theoretical and practical counseling once yearly for 3 years (intervention group [INT]) or standard care (control group [CON])...
November 2017: Diabetes Care
Emily Frith, Paul D Loprinzi
OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the specific differential association between non-bouted, lifestyle physical activities (vs. structured exercise; i.e., bouted physical activity) on retinopathy prevalence among a national sample of the broader U.S. adult population. METHODS: Data from the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) was used to identify 1501 adults, between 40 and 85years. Bouted and non-bouted physical activities were assessed using objective accelerometer monitoring...
August 14, 2017: European Journal of Internal Medicine
Alicja R Rudnicka, Claire M Nightingale, Angela S Donin, Naveed Sattar, Derek G Cook, Peter H Whincup, Christopher G Owen
BACKGROUND: Associations between sleep duration and type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk markers in childhood have been little studied. We examined associations between self-reported sleep duration and T2D risk markers in children. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 4525 multiethnic UK children aged 9 to 10 years. Sleep time was calculated from self-reported usual time of going to bed and getting up on a school day, validated in a subset using accelerometers. Fasting blood samples provided levels of serum lipids and insulin, plasma glucose, and HbA1c...
September 2017: Pediatrics
Clare L Clarke, Falko F Sniehotta, Thenmalar Vadiveloo, Ishbel S Argo, Peter T Donnan, Marion E T McMurdo, Miles D Witham
BACKGROUND: Cross-sectional relationships between physical activity and health have been explored extensively, but less is known about how physical activity changes with time in older people. The aim of this study was to assess baseline predictors of how objectively measured physical activity changes with time in older people. METHODS: Longitudinal cohort study using data from the Physical Activity Cohort Scotland. A sample of community-dwelling older people aged 65 and over were recruited in 2009-2011, then followed up 2-3 years later...
August 14, 2017: BMC Geriatrics
Steven S Coughlin, Christos Hatzigeorgiou, Judith Anglin, Ding Xie, Gina M Besenyi, Gianluca De Leo, Jessica Stewart, Thad Wilkins
BACKGROUND: Diet and exercise therapy have been reported to be effective in improving blood glucose control and are an important part of treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this study is to examine the efficacy of a healthy lifestyle intervention for adult clinic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, as measured by Hgb-A1c, cardiovascular indicators, physical activity, weight, and BMI. Also of interest are optimal strategies for subject recruitment, the number of intervention sessions attended, and participant use of the Fitbit watch to monitor their physical activity and track food and beverage consumption...
2017: Diabetes Management
L Montesinos-Magraner, P Serra-Añó, X García-Massó, L Ramírez-Garcerán, L-M González, M Á González-Viejo
STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive cross-sectional study. SETTING: The study was conducted in the Spinal Cord Injury Unit of the University Vall d'Hebron Hospital and in the Physical Education and Sports Department of the University of Valencia. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to quantify the presence of comorbidities in spinal cord injury (SCI) subjects who did or did not perform regular physical activity (PA) and to identify the relationship between PA and the level of comorbidity...
August 1, 2017: Spinal Cord
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